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Prepare YouRSElh 



MAkiNq A MARk 1 2 



Impact ResIstant 1 10 



Power of ihe iNdividuAl 1 90 



Group EFFort 286 



GREEksUNifiEd 518 



BluESTONE GaUery 548 

LifEloiNq Impact 584 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/bluestone199385jame 





VOLUME 85 
3AMBS MAVDSOJ^ 

Hy\RR JSOM B UKO 
VJKOJMJA 

22807 



Title Page | 








m \^" 



In a year of uncertainty and change, 
students at James Madison University 
were up to the challenge. The world around 
us was often as confusing as trying to 
determine what to do with the rest of our 
lives. Academics, activities and the social 
life at JMU, while continually changing, 
were always stimulating and worthy of 
student involvement. Whether directly or 
indirectly, purposeful or unintentional, our 
decisions and actions influenced other 
people in addition to ourselves. As the 
year progressed students were forced to 
be prepared for the changes they would 
experience, and those they would enact, 
in all facets of life, students had to PRE- 
PARE FOR IMPACT. 



Cuiltoylc 



SQUEEZE ME. The Duke Dog and a JMU 
student exchange a friendly hug at a football 
game. The JMU mascot helped to heighten spirit 
among members of the crowd and team players 
alike. 



O Opening 




ON THE ROAD AGAIN.Members of the Tour 
DuPont cycle through the JMU campus. This 
race toured the east coast drawing international 
attention and perticipants. 







SERENITY. A flock of ducks 
enjoys a leisurely swim across 
Newman Lake. The Lake area, 
graced by a scenic view of 
Greek Row, provided students 
with some seclusion from a 
bustling campus. 



FACETED. The back view of 
Wilson Hall is framed by the 
colorful autumn leaves and 
azure blue sky. Wilson Hall 
housed many administrative , 
finance and telecommunica- 
tion offices. 



MOVIN' IN. A freshman 
student unloads a packed car 
with some help from her 
.parents. Moving in has 
typically always been a day 
filled with excitements anci 
frustrations. 



Kogerii 



Opening ^ 



QUIET TIME. JuniorKavis 

Fleming escapes noisy 

classrooms for some quiet 

reading on a bench near Moody 

Hall. Many students enjoyed 

studying outdoors during 

pleasant weather, 

ON TRACK. A JMU alumni 
runs on the track of Bridgeforth 
Stadium, while Wilson Hall 
looms in the backdrop. The 
stadium was used for numer- 
ous sporting events and 
ceremonies. 



REFLECTIONS. Trees 

surronding Newman Lake are 

mirrored in the windows of 

Sonner Hall. Buildings and 

nature combined to present 

incredible scenery on campus. 





K,.^v, 



KL'i,vr.>; 




Ro\;en 
CONTRAST. Construction 
cranes loom against the back- 
ground of the Shenandoah Val- 
ley. Many found it exciting to 
watch the develpment of the new 
addition to the WCC. 



H Opening 



OVERALL 



rMP^CT 



The impact we made went further 
than the campus of JMU. In the year of a 
Presidential election, candidates were 
forced to address questions of our gen- 
eration. Just as the election impacted our 
lives through political discussions and party 
affiliations, our vote was also important as 
we chose the next president.A sign of our 
changing times was evident in the in- 
crease in cause involvement around cam- 
pus. Supporters of the women's move- 
ment made their voices heard through 
active protests and organizations such as 
NOW, the National Organization for Women. 
Campus-wide movements focused on date- 
rape, AIDS and other diseases, and the 
poor and needy. The environment also 
remained a main concern with JMU stu- 
dents, who encouraged recycling efforts 
all throughout campus. These issues and 
others were on the forefront of students 
minds in their effort to make their voices 
heard and their impact on society. 




LET'S DO LUNCH! Two friends take advantage 
of the beautiful weather to eat their carry-out 
lunches from Dukes. The Quad was an extremely 
popular place to meet friends, study, play frisbee 
or just hang out. 



Opening C^ 






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SPLENDOR. The beauty of the 
campus bursts forth in an 
incredible display of fall colors. 
Students often retreated 
outdoors to enjoy the natural 
beauty of JMU. 




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6 Op 



ening 



JRALL 

IMPACT 



fact of life at JMU. As the addition 
irren Campus Center continued and 
rk on JMU's newest dorm, Wampler 
11^ began, the sounds of workers buil 
png awakened us and caused some incoi 
renience for students. But after noting 
the finished products of Burruss and 
lane Showker Halls the previous year, 
tost agreed that the construction woul 
improve our campus as it expanded to 
leet increasing demand. 

Another one of those expansions 
^as the new College of Integrated Sci- 
ence and Technology. The new college 
lad a great impact on students, in ways 
they might not have expected. 



i 





TALKIN'SHOP. WXJM's business manager, 
Patrick Belcher, speaks with students about the 
campus radio station at Student Activities night. 
There, students learned about the different 
organizations they could get involved in. 






TIME OUT. Students gather on 
the Quad to fraternize with 
friends and relax between 
classes. The Quad fit students' 
needs as a meeting room, 
playground and bed. 

SYMBOLIC. A mold represent- 
ing the Wilson Hall coupola is 
located on a JMU sign facing 
Main Street. This symbol was 
seen on various JMU 
paraphenalia, ranging from 
pencils to cups to T-shirts. 



U\nltm/U' 



TUNNEL VISION. The arches of Sheldon Hall 
enclose a scenic view of campus buildings. 
Around corners and out-of-the-way passage- 
ways sometimes offered surprising scenery. 



Rogers 



Opening ^ 



OVERALL 



JMU has typically always been noted for its 
liberal arts specialties, and the new focus 
on science and technical aspects forced 
students to adjust to a new image. Thus, as 
the new college accepted its first students, 
its impact was seen in changes in the 
student body at JMU. 

Just as changes impacted campus 
life, our influence spilled over into the 
Harrisonburg community. Greek organiza- 
tions made contributions to local causes 
such as the Mercy House and Big Brothers/ 
Big Sisters of Harrisonburg. The growth 
and expansion of our university affected 
the Harrisonburg area and JMU made an 
active effort to promote a friendly relation- 
ship between the school and community. 



WHAT A PLA 

ball player-tii 

shows off his ha 

Scenes such as 

Village volleylllll 

very comnn) 

enjoying thems 



! This voUey- 

ned -gymnast 

dstand skills. 

one on the 

court were 

with friends 

outdoors. 



list 



/est 



Q Opening 






FOOD AND FUN. Hungry students congregate 
in front of D-Hall before lunch. The tables 
outside and the hill were common areas for 
relaxing and hanging out to study before next 
classes. 

HOLDIN' ON. This student shows a look of 
concentration as he repels down Eagle Hall. The 
ROTC sponsored repeling activities for interested 
and daring students. 




LOOK BEYOND. Railroad tracks extend through FALL FOLIAGE. The bright coloi_s ot the leaves 

campus and beyond to the Coast. The tracks make Hanson field come ahve. In the fall season, 

were used by students as a walkway when the the field has been used for intramural field 

train wasn't present. hockey and tailgating before football games. 



\ 



T 

^ A 



Opening O 



SEA OF GREEN. Wilson Hall is captured in a 

rare quiet moment. This administrative office 

building was usually a bustle of activity. 





Rnj^prs 



RARE BIRD. A blue heron 

wades into the runoff waters of 

Newman Lake. Wildlife other 

than ducks were sometimes 

found in the more hidden areas 

around the lake. 




Rogers 









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Rogers 



PEACE. Fall foliage surronds this student as she 
walks across the Quad. Autumn colors bright- 
ened the campus throughout October. 



^ Opening 



OK! Alpha Chi Omega sisters Jen Tobin, Jill 
ihnson and Elizabeth Whelan watch the rafts 
ttempting to cross Newman Lake during Greek 
iJeek. 

CEAN BLUE. The lead singer of Ocean Blue 
itertains the audience in Godwin Gym. The 
imcert, sponsored by UPB, was held at the 
eginning of the school year. 




OVERALL 

IMPACT 



The arrlvial of Ralph Sampson , a 
Harrisonburg native and NBA star, as 
the Dukes^ newest assistant basketball 
coach was much celebrated by JMU M 
sports fans. Sampson's reputation and 
experience had a great impact on the 
program y and brought additional recogni- 
tion to the school. Other athletic teams 
were catapulted into the spotlight such 
as the nationally ranked women's and 
men's soccer teams. These and othei 
athletic feats changed and helped im 
prove JIVIU's image. 

The goals of everyone associated 
with the place. JIVIU students shared 
this goal and worked to accomplish it. 
We knew that we were the future of the^ 
university and society. In order to ac 
cept the challenges ahead of us, we ha 
to PREPARE FOR IMPACT. 




,, ij^cij;^ 



^ 



MOiN 

>VL-lC 

81 
breaS 



' FROM HOME. This exit is a 
I for students as they travel down I- 
Ito campus after holidays and 
gerly anticipated. 



Opening ^ ^ 




STUP(£A]TS 

pRar)(SaA] 



aA)VOLV(£P 




Holick 



'\ ^2, Features Divider 



SPIRIT. Kent Bakke and the other members of the 
Marching Royal Dukes do push-ups after the football 
team scores. The marching band provided half time 
entertainment for each of the football games. 

RHYTHM. Phi Beta Sigma brothers leave the 
audience awe-struck as they stomp their way into 
Step Show history. The Step Show gave Black 
fraternities and sororities opportunity to display 
their talent and enthusiasm. 

F<£y\T UReS eDOTORi 

ASST. F(£ATUReS <£DJTOR: 
(CaAJDV SCOTT 



MAKING 




A person's world is influenced by 
the events that occur around them. 
At JMU, students understood that 
they could make a difference in 
their surroundings. By becoming 
involved in the vast number of 
activities available, students dem- 
onstrated that they wanted to take 
an active role in the course of their 
college career. 

JMU facilitated the demands of 
the students by sponsoring and 
supporting a wide variety of events, 
lectures and opportunities to pui^ 
sue their interests. Whether watch- 
ing a local band, traveling, or meet- 
ing people with similar attitudes 
toward life and its purposes, stu- 
dents utilized their time to make 
their impact on the world around 
them. 



Holkk 




MARK 



Features Divider ^ ^ 



HOT $ POT 



the 



Deep in the heart of the Shenandoah Valley laid 

a strip of land that did not appear on a tourist map. 

There were no t-shirts, pennants or even bumper 

stickers that paid tribute to this land. In fact, there 

was only a select few who had the 

privilege to walk its paths, climb 

/"^•^^ its rocks and admire its beauty. 

^^X L Fortunately, by being enrolled at 

James Madison University, one 

1 could visit this natural wonder- 

/~T[ 1 1 ^k /| land daily. This place, which 

V^ Li^t4.\«4. could easily be taken for granted, 

was known as the Quad. 

Day after day, students 

used the quad for a number of 

purposes. At any given time, one could sense the 




fun 



importance of the quad just by watching the various 
activities that took place there. Some chose the quad 
rather than their rooms for a quick nap, while others 
opted for a more active time playing football or 
throwing a frisbee. The flat grassy mall was also a 
favorite for last minute cramming sessions just be- 
fore class in Harrison or Jackson. Whatever the 
activity, there was always room on the quad. 

Walking through the quad gave visitors a 
taste of all that comprised JMU's uniqueness. From 
the beauty of the bordering flowers along the edges 
of the charming Bluestones to the campus unity 
displayed by students talking, laughing, playing 
and studying, the center of campus remained the 
hot spot for students to enjoy the weather and a 
leisure moment. -Daryl Pigat 




BEST FRIENDS 



Steve VanDam 

explains to his 

dog that it is 

supposed to fetch 

the stick when he 

throws it. The 

quad served as a 

great play ground 

for students' pets. 




-^ ^ The Quad 




CATCHING UP 

^ 

Senior Kevin 
Catrell catches up 
on the latest news 
as he reads USA 
Today. The quad 
was a popular 
place for students 
to relax and read. 



FLYING SAUCER 



Two members of 
the JMU Commu- 
nity take 
advantage of the 
warm weather 
and and play 
frisbee on the 
quad. Both 
students and 
professors 
playedon the 
quad. 





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ALL SMILES 

^ 

Nicole Maslov 

laughs at a joke 

her friend Randy 

Jefferson told her. 

Couples often 

enjoyed spending 

their time together 

while relaxing on 

the green grass of 

the quad. 



FOUNDATION 



Wilson Hall, 

which houses the 

President's office, 

stands at the head 

of the quad. 

Wilson Hall was 

the first building 

erected on 

campus in 1908. 




WHAT? 



"The quad is the 

ideal place to 

hangout. . . It's 

just cool. " 

-Brian 
McEutire, 
sophomore 







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The Quad ^ 3 



PARADISE 



s^yr' 



It was a long-standing tradition for thousands of 
college students to flock to Florida each March for a 
week of fun and sun. JMU students were no excep- 
tion to this rule. After six months of living in the 
'Burg everyone wanted to get 
away from tests, papers and, of 
course, the wonderful smell of 
dog food when it rained. 

Daytona Beach was the 
heart of the Spring Break party 
scene, but because of increased 
law enforcement, quite a few stu- 
dents headed elsewhere. Panama 
City, Fort Lauderdale and the 
Keys were traditionally popular 
vacation destinations. Students who wanted to do 
something a little more exotic and had a little more 
cash went on cruises to the Bahamas or Cancun. 

For JMU students. Spring Break of 1992 was 
especially exciting because it fell on the same week 
as Mardi Gras. This opportunity was too good for 
many students to pass up. Quite a few students took 
advantage of this and headed down to New Orleans 
to experience the French Quarter during its peak 
season. 

Some students went to New Orleans on a trip 




frolicking 
in the sun 




BEADS GALORE 

^ 

These JMU 

students display 

their beads that 

they acquired 

during Mardi 

Gras festivities in 

New Orleans. 

Several JMU 

students were 

able to attend 

Mardi Gras 

through the UPB 

sponsored trip 

during Spring 

Break. 



sponsored by the UPB. Others loaded up their own 
cars and drove down to stay with friends. Junior 
Jeff Rohe described it as "the best week of my Hfe." 
For Spring Breakers in search of the ultimate party, 
Mardi Gras was just the place. 

Some students were looking for action and ad- 
venture. Spring Break gave students the opportu- 
nity to try new things. Junior Lisa Cordiano went 
parasailing for the first time over Spring Break. She 
said her experience was "incredible because you 
could see the ocean for miles." 

Not all students searched for a week of non-stop 
parties and lots of activites. Some welcomed the 
chance to get away from the school atmosphere and 
chill at home with their family and friends. "I took 
advantage of the time to go home with some friends 
and relax and enjoy their company," said sopho- 
more Colleen Magin. 

The things students chose to do for Spring Break 
were very diversified. The bonding which occured 
on weeks such as these made Spring Break memo- 
rable. It was important for every student to go away 
at least once because it was "something you can 
only experience in college," according to senior 
Marketing major Joe Uglialoro. 
-Beth Anne Howie 





WHAT? 



"/ worked with 
the poor Ui 
Kentucky; it 
was challeng- 
ing, but really 

fun." 

-Kim Ronald 

junior 



MINE! 



On the sandy 

beaches of 

Panama City, 

Seniors Andy 

Strasser and Brad 

Coles play 

volleyball. Beach 

Volleyball was a 

popular Spring 

Break acti\'ity. 



GET GOOFY 

^ 

Senior Steve 
Forrey greets 
Goofy at Walt 
Disney World in 
Orlando Florida. 
Disney World 
attracted several 
Spring Breakers 
because of its 
variety of 
activities as well 
as its warm 
climate. 



HOLD IT 



These JMU 

students clown 

around and enjoy 

the beautiful 

beaches of the 

Bahamas. For 

those who could 

afford it, the 

Bahamas was a 

wonderful Spring 

Break resort. 



^ A Spring Break 



L 



MAKIN' MUSIC 

^ 

Senior Alison 
Harris wows the 
crowd with her 
musical talent 
during Karaoke at 
a resort in Cocoa 
Beach, Florida. 
Students trekked 
south to Florida 
to partake in all 
kinds of enter- 
tainment. 




Spring Break { f 



LIL' DUKES 

^ 

These two Dukes 

fans are all smiles 

at a football game. 

Dukes fans came 

in all sizes. 




FIRED UP 




"Madison, James Madison. We are the Dukes of 
JMU. Madison, James Madison..." 

A true and loyal JMU fan lived by these words. It 
seemed that anyone affiliated with JMU had an 
abundance of spirit and pride. Faculty, alumni, 
administrators, Harrisonburg residents, the Duke 

Dog, and students 
alike were all very 
loyal to JMU. 

JMU sporting 
events were fine ex- 
amples of spirit in 
action, especially 
football and basket- 
ball games. The 
crowd went wild 
and the arenas were 
always packed with faithful spectators. The "Elec- 
tric Zoo," the upper tier of the basketball court 
across from the band, and "the pit" were the prime 



duke spirit 
reigns 



spots in which to enjoy the basketball games. Stu- 
dents displayed enthusiasm with school parapher- 
nalia, encouraging signs and body paint. 

Junior Kate Ouellette, claimed, "I think the 
spirit is amazing here at JMU. The fans are crazy, 
especially my friends and I. We wouldn't dream of 
missing a game!" One sophomore proclaimed "The 
band has a lot to do with our overall liveliness. ..they 
are awesome!" Students loved the Duke Dog and 
his antics as did the spirited future freshmen in the 
Puppy Pound! 

No matter what the score or the weather, Dukes 
fans always seemed to be having fun. As Linda 
Butler recalled, "Ever since I was a freshman, 1 
would try to schedule everything around a football, 
basketball or baseball game." 

"They put you into such a great mood! I love 
JMU!" interjected her friend, Leigh Anne Bailey. 

The spirit of James Madison University will live 
on forever. Long Live The Dukes! 

-Randi Gische 



.;V I 



1 8 Spirit 





WHAT? 



"If I don't go to 
every football 
game, I feel 
guilty. " 
-Elizabeth 
Cartivright 
sopliomoir 



DUKE DOG! 

^ 

The Duke Dog 

visits with a 

couple of fans at 

a football game. 

The mascot did all 

he could to raise 

spirit at sporting 

events. 



GO DUKES! 

^ 

Members of the 
Marching Royal 
Dukes cheer on 
the team. The 
MRD were a 
foundation of 
spirit. 

NO WAY! 

-^ 

Spirited JMU fans 
holler at a bad 
call. Referees 
were undoubtedly 
the least popular 
men on the field. 




HIGH FTVE 

-^ 

Elaine Schoka and 

David Majer slap 
each other's hand 
in celebration of a 
Dukes touch- 
down. Football 
games drew large 
crowds and often 
filled the stands. 



Spirit ^ (p 



AT THE FRONT 



Rachel Nalepp.i 

takes the lead in 

the trav races. 

The object of the 

event was to cross 

the finisli line 

without spilling 

the cup of beer 

that rested on the 

trav. 



HEAD HRST 



Craig Clark 
attempts to regain 
balance as Aaron 
Saks, Steve 
Malekzedah, and 
Sean Kellev 
propel their 
homemade LXA 
raft. The Newman 
Lake Boat Race 
provided a great 
deal of entertain- 
ment, especiallv 
when boats 
capsized. 




OREEKFUN 




fun with 
a cause 



^2£dL 



^^^SfflTOWt^ 



Sponsored by the Order of Omega, Greek Week 
1992 was characterized by the undertones of service 
and unity. For the first time, the Greek community 
used this particular week as an opportunity to work 
toward a charitable cause. By cionating proceeds to 
the Make A Wish Foundation, Greeks hoped to 
make the dream of a terminally ill child come true. 
The goal was to raise enough money to send Roger, 
a ten year old boy who was terminally ill, to see the 
Rocky Mountains. 

Greek Sing, which was 
held in Godwin Hall before hun- 
dreds of spectators, drew a large 
crowd. The audience was enter- 
tained by a variety of musical 
"interpretations" by fraternities 
and sororities. A Step Show was 
part of Greek Sing for the first 
time. Tracie McNaron, Assis- 
tant Greek Coordinator and director of Greek Week 
'92, said, "It's the first time historically Black Greek 
organizations have stepped at Greek Sing, and it 



won't be the last!" 

As beautiful weather held out all week, both 
Greeks and non-Greeks turned out in full force to 
show their spirit and support. Participants racked 
up points for their fraternity or sorority in events 
such as the Keg Toss, Eating contest. Volleyball 
Tournament and Crest Drawing. Greeks exhibited 
unity by gathering for these friendly competitions, 
working together in Row Clean Up and attending 
seminars like the self-esteem presentation by na- 
tionally renowned speaker. Will Keim. 

The week culminated in the long anticipated 
Greek Games with the traditional boat races across 
Newman Lake. When the week and the games 
came to a close. Alpha Chi Omega and Pi Kappa Phi 
finally emerged as the first place winners. 

Always a time of fun and games for all, Greek 
Week 1992 was a definite success, fostering integra- 
tion and unity both within and outside the system, 
and raising almost $3,000 to send Roger to the 
Rockies! 

-Rebecca Haile 



WHAT? 



"Greek life is an 
opportunity 

that all should 
experience. " 

-Caryn Poiuell 
senior 



TEAM EFFORT 



Members of 

Kappa Sigma 

fraternity anchor 

their feet in the 

sand in an 

attempt to win the 

tug-of-vvar 

championship, 

The event was one 

of the many 

activities that took 

place during 

Greek Week 



I 



20 



Greek Week 




TAKE A BREAK 

^ 

Members of the 

Greek community 

relax in the sun 

and watch the 

greek games. 

Greek Week 

provided an 

opportunity for 

greeks to interact 

with each other. 




AGONY 



A loyal sister 
struggles to pull 
her weight in the 

tup-of-war 

challenge. The 

event drew a large 

crowd of 

spectators. 



Greek Week 



21 



GRADUATION 



While JMU's underclassmen were at home un- 
packing their belongings for the summer, the class 
of '92 was still on campus. They had a date to keep. 
For the senior Dukes, graduation day '92 was both 

an end and a 
beginning. 




JMU's newest 



BURNING ON 



Graduating 

seniors raise their 

lighted candles at 

the traditional 

candlelight 

procession on the 

Quad. The 

graduation eve 

ceremony marks 

the seniors' last 

night as students 

atJMU. 



May 2, 
1992 was an 
end to four (or 
perhaps five) 

^111 TY^ T^ 1 yesrs of life at 
dlU-ilLlLi JMU The day 

marked an end 
to classes, par- 
ties, dates, 
lounging on the quad and all of the other activities 
that accumulate over four or five years at JMU. 
Seniors saw the day as one last chance to say good- 
bye to friends of four years, to celebrate as the class 
of 1992 one final time. 

Graduation day marked the end of a year that 
saw the Duke Dog challenged as JMU's mascot, the 
football team go to the national quarter finals, the 
emergence of Ross Perot and riots in Los Angeles. 

May 2 also marked a beginning. JMU's newest 
alumni were ready to start the next chapter of their 
lives. Some were headed for graduate schools, 
while more were moving into the workplace. 

The class of '92 had a picturesque start to their 
new lives. The weather was clear and sunny, with 



an occasional cool breeze wafting through the sta- 
dium, bringing relief from the heat. The atmo- 
sphere was jubilant, although there was a reverent 
quiet during the class's student speech, which was 
presented by William Howard Whitaker 11. Whitaker 
focused on the Los Angeles riots touched off by the 
Rodney King scandal. Whitaker also spoke about 
the responsibilities JMU students have to avoid 
such troubles in the future and to lead the way to 
better times. 

The joyous atmosphere increased as the diplo- 
mas were handed out. By the time the graduates of 
the School of Business were approaching the po- 
dium, the rest of the graduates had left their seats. 
They were looking for friends to say one last good- 
bye. While Dr. Oberst requested students retake 
their seats and keep the procession formal, the 
students had other things in mind. None of the 
students waiting to go on stage seemed to be both- 
ered by the pandemonium. They knew they would 
get their moment in the limelight, their chance to 
shake Dr. Carrier's hand and to hear their name 
called in front of their classmates and parents. 

As the class of 1992 dispersed from the stadium 
with parents and friends, they realized that they 
were saying good-bye to JMU. They were walking 
into a new chapter of life as JMU's newest set of 
Alumni. 

-Vasha Hunt 






WHAT? 

"The atmo- 
sphere was 
really crazy. 
There were so 
many goodbyes 

to say. " 

-Dave Schlek 

aliiiiiuiis 



Courti'sy of Universily Publicatiom 




l2, ^2- Graduation 



CONGRATS 

^^ 

A happy graduate 
gives proper 
thanks to his Dad. 
Hugs were a 
popular show of 
emotion for all the 
grads. 



OUTTA HERE! 

A look of pride 
speaks for itself. 
Seniors ending 
their college 
careers rejoiced 
upon receiving 
their diplomas. 



HI MOM! 





The class of '92 

proceeds to the 

podium. Four 

years of higher 

education were 

greatly rewarded 

with a Bachelor's 











H'' ' ' '^^i^^^^^^l 





Graduation 2 




DamoiiJ 



2 ^ Summer Fun 



FUN AND SUN 




WHAT? 



"The great 
thing about 



nUNG UP 

MU students 
build a human 
pyramid on the 
Mall in Washing- 
ton, D.C. Several 

tudents attended 
the Independence 
Day festivities in 
D.C. 



REACH 



Sophomore Sean 
Desmond serves 
the ball at Bellport 
Beach, Long 
Island. Beach 
volleyball was a 
popular sport for 
students who 
lived near the 
beach. 




"What are you doing this summer?" It seemed 
like everyone was asking their friends this question 
as the dreary winter months dragged on. For many 
students at Madison, summer was a time to relax, 
see okl friends, make some money or buiki up the 



students to do what thev wantei 
of .lii, |\1U students loved the bench! VVheti exams 
ended, everyone loaded their cars with coolers, 
beach balls and buddies. Favorite spots were \ ir- 
^iriia Beach, Na gs Head, Myrtle Beach, Jersey Shore, 

?orne stuaents stayea m tne Durg tor iviay : 
sion or summer classes, but even that wasn' t so bad ! 
"After class, a group of us would head to the moun- 
tains and swim all day," Senior Nancy Bograd said. 
Popular spots were Blue Hole, Switzer's Dam and 
Skyline Drive for hiking. At night, there were tons of 
great bands at Joker's and plenty of parties held by 
students taking a study break. Others chose to see 
sites in the area that they might not have seen 



during the school year. At Monticello in 
Charlottesville, sophomore Nikki Blanchett and 
senior Carrie Diehl had picnics in the beautiful 
gardens. Nearby Staunton and Richmond boasted 
great museums, such as the 



\%'hich featured Degas' "Little 
Danct r' . 

C~)f course we needed money to 
finance our fun and save for those 

costlv textbooks. WaitiUK tabic 



days o; 
summer 



non occupations, mere were a 
few students who worked as interns. Senior Jenny 
Rissler and junior Kate McFadden had internships 
with Styles magazine. 

Above all, JMU students enjoyed the break from 
classes and homework. But everyone looked for- 
ward to seeing their friends again in August, even if 
it meant back to the books! 

-Jennifer Grossman 



STUDS 




Seniors Ken 
Marcus and Todd 
Womack ham it 
up for the camera 
while lounging on 
the beaches of 
Panama City. 




BIKINI CITY 



Members of the 
Dukettes show off 
their beautiful 
tans. The 
Dukettes spent 
part of their 
summer in 
Florida. 



Coiirtcsi/ of the Dukettes 



Summer fun 



25 



TIES & JACKETS 


^ 


Matt Charleston, 


■».- 


Frank Wade and 


' 


Matt Zickel speak 




v\ith members of 




the U.S. Navy. 




The Job Fair 




offered students a 




chance to acquaint 




themselves with 




prospective 




employers. 







ffiLPING HAND 



Students attend a 
workshop for 
conducting a job 
search. OCS held 
a variety of 
workshops that 
led students step- 
by-step through 
the job search. 



I 



DESTINATION 



Sonner Hall 

welcomes 

students who are 

job hunting. 

Career services 

offered a variety 

of means for 

researching jobs 

and internships. 




WHAT? 



"I use tlie career 

center all the 

time-for every 

new major I 

have. " 
-Stephanie 
Concodora 
soplioinore 



5N THE HUNT 



I Sophomore 

[Danielle 

iChweisthal takes 
the Myers-Briggs 
placement test as 
Caesar Carvajal 
\ luvvs Career 
' 'pportunities. 

I lu- library had a 
great deal of 
useful materials. 




HEAD-HUNTING 



Senior David Kerr 

scans the Interview 

board to see who 

made the "Big Six." 

Students often 

lined up before the 

doors opened to 

sign up for 
interview times. 




LOOK AHEAD 



Career services, conveniently located in Sonner 
Hall, provided JMU students with various work- 
shops, interview training, and on-campus recruit- 
ing. Through these programs students were able to 
learn and master the skills needed to conduct a 
successful job search and ultimately obtain the po- 
sition they had been searching for. 

"1 went to the workshops to learn about resume 
writing and interviewing, and when it came time to 
actually go on interviews I felt so much more pre- 
pared. They were such a big help," said Carrie 
Diehl, a senior. 

"The graduate school fair really helped me learn 
about various programs offered by many different 




schools," said Wesley Mallette, a JMU graduate now 
attending graduate school at the 
University of Maryland. 

Graduating from college was a 
frightening experience no inatter 
what route we chose to take take. 
Suddenly reality hit and we were 
forced to make real choices about 
ourselves and our futures. The 
counselors at career services un- 
derstood the confusion and anxi- 
ety of the soon-to-be graduates. 
"Unquestionably, Career Services made life for seniors 
a little less hectic. 

-Nancy Bograd 



career 
services 



Career Services O '7 





«^^" :.. 



SOME R&R 



Westover Park 

lures people of all 

ages to its natural 

beauty. Local 

residents, 

students and 

faculty members 

often retreated to 

the open fields 

and swimming 

pool to get away 

from work and 

studies. 







Tmu; 



>i 



iMMM 





WHAT? 



"It 's a small 

houm, but it has 

I a lot to offer. " 

-Jason E. Lich, 

junior 



! 



VIAJESTY 

This place of 
residence attracts 
several tourists 
:>ecause of its 
vibrant colors and 
Victorian style 
architecture. 
Many of the 
houses around 
town held their 
own cliarm and 
simple beauty. 

'DELfClOUS 



A somber 
Spanky's awaits 
the evening 
Towd. Spanky's 
as a favorite 
[among students 
and offered a 
variety of 
sandwiches with 
[an atmosphere to 
match. 

ON RECORD 

The unassuming 

Town and 

Campus Records 

displays its 

variety of offered 

merchandise. The 

shop catered to 

students wishing 

to buy used CD's 

and local band 

recordings. 



ON THE MAP 



Hello everyone and welcome to Harrisonburg, 
Virginia. As we head up Main Street and begin our 
tour of the 'burg, on our right is the Joshua Wilton 
House, Harrisonburg's infamous Bed and Break- 
fast. As vou can see from the architecture of the 
restored house, it is modeled in the spirit of the early 
Victorian period. 

Now we'll turn onto Water street where we'll 
find a local favorite, Spanky's restaurant. It's a cozy 
deh-style eatery, with dessert specialties and a vast 
selection of candies and sweets from countries across 
the globe. Next door is Town and Campus Records, 
which supports our own local bands by selling their 
paraphernalia and CD's. 

As we make our way back to Main Street, you'll 
see Touch the Earth tucked away between local 
fabric and sewing stores. Touch the Earth sells a 
wide variety of tie dyes, Guatemalan clothing and 
jewelry. Our next point of interest is Glenn's Fair 
Price Store. This store has anything and everything. 
Just down the street is The Little Grill, a deli restau- 
rant devoted to American foods and specialty nights, 
such as poetry reading nights and return to the 70's 
disco nights. 

Now we're going to head up South Ave. into the 
suburbs of Harrisonburg. Westover Park, where 
there is plenty of picnic tables and a swimming 
pool, is on the right. 

We'll head down Route 33, also known as East 





Guilfoyte 



Market Street. Here we have Market Square East 
Shopping Center. Included in the center are Mr. J's 
Bagels, The Beanery, Pargo's and the Waffle House. 
Mr. J's serves bagels and piping hot muffins in a 
nouveau-rich 
atmosphere] 



a tour of 
Harrisonburg 



The Beanery 
hasaBostonian 
flair, with 
American cui- 
sine and a pub- 
like atmo- 
sphere. Pargo's 
is one of 

Harrisonburg's upscale restaurants, with American 
food and specialty mixed drinks. They are also well 
known for their desserts. 

The last leg of our trip is down University Boule- 
vard. On our right is one of Harrisonburg's newest 
restaurant, Clayborne's. This restaurant is well 
known for its seafood and mixed drinks. On the left 
is the Bull Pen where you can go if you've got an itch 
to get some batting practice or play some miniature 
golf. 

We have reached the final destination of our tour, 
the JMU Arboretum. Feel free to walk leisurely 
along the many nature trails. Well, I hope you've 
had a good time, and wish you a wonderful day. 
Thanks for traveling with Harrisonburg Tours! 

-Vasha Hunt 








Citiltoylc 



ON THE GRILL 



The Little Grill 

exhibits the 

simple and rustic 

mood of a country 

• diner. The 

restaurant held 

open mike and 

poetry nights. 



The Burg 2^ 



MELODIES 



SING OUT 



The lead singer for 

Uncle Charlie 

bellows out to a 

crowd at the Lake 

Quake. The Lake 

Quake was a party 

for the lake area 

residents. 



The lights are dimmed and a heady aroma of 
sweat mixed with smoke hovers about the air. Bar- 
maids call out drink orders, while a slight buzz of 
chatty conversation is heard from the four corners 
of the cracker jack room. Sud- 
denly, an ear piercing cry hushes 
the crowd and two hundred heads 
nonchalantly turn towards the 
source. 

Sound like an exerpt from 
a Hollywood mini series? It is 
possible, but more likely, it was 
the opening of a performance by 
one of the many local bands that 
were frequented by JMU students. 
Harrisonburg served as an industrial center for 
musical talent. Bands such as The Dave Matthews 
Band, Johnnies Heritage, Full Stop, BS&M, and 
countless others rocked the 'Burg until it could not 
stop dancing. 

The Dave Matthews Band was the latest to be 
added to the list of preferred bands by students. 
Though the band was fairly young, the members 
quickly proved themselves to be quite worthy of the 
attention they had been receiving in their home- 
town, Charlottesville. Band members attributed 




rocking 
the 'burg 



their success to the fact that their personalities were 
all "different in some way or another. " 

Johnnies Heritage was another favorite among 
students. Playing together since freshman year, the 
band acquired a following very rapidly. They fre- 
quently played at Chi Phi Fraternity who strongly 
supported brother Jon Pineda. The group's album, 
simply entitled "Strange Fits of Passion," became a 
staple in JMU students' music collections. On stage, 
the band radiated an exhuberant amount of en- 
ergy — whether guitarist Rob Butler was running 
through the crowd or percussionist Brian Belforte 
was dancing to the beat of his tambourine, the 
crowd was both pleased and responsive. 

Another band that drew positive responses from 
JMU students was Full Stop. Specializing in funk, 
rock and reggae, the band played to crowds ranging 
in musical interests. BS&M was also a crowd pleaser, 
playing quite often at several of the clubs around 
campus. Sadler & Segree was geared towards a 
more relaxed crowd, often pulling the plugs and 
playing acoustic guitars. 

Regardless of one's musical interests, there was 
always live entertainment around the 'Burg for 
everyone. 

-Cindy Scott 





WHAT? 



"Wc don't go 

home with 

beautiful 

women every 

night. . .loe 

usnalhj just sit 

on our amps!" 

'Daniel, 

Robinso)i 

Johnnies 

Heritage 



IN FULL SWING I 



Members of Full , 

Stop play at the 

Senior Pig Roast. 

The band drew a j 

large crowd at the 

roast and also at 

local bars 

whenever they 

played. 

ALL HAIR 



A member of 
Uncle Charlie 
swings his head in 
rythm with the 
music. Uncle 
Charlie was one of 
several bands that 
performed at the 
Lake Quake, 
which was held 
for lake area 
residents. 



SWEET MUSIC j 

^ 1 

Jon Pineda pours 
his heart and soul 
into a perfor- 
mance at JM's. 
Pineda was the 
front man for 
Johnnies Heritage. 



M,ii;ii 



Mti;^in 



30 



Local Bands 




JAMMIN' 



A member of 
BS&M jams on his 
bass guitar for a 
crowd at JlVl's. 
JM's provided live 
entertainment 
every Wednesday 
niglit. 



Local Bands 



31 




The JMU in Italy 

program gathers 

in front of St. 

Peter's Basilica. 

Vatican Cit\' 

attracted tourists 

from all over the 

world. 

ANCIENT RUINS l^^ 



Bethanv Blair, ~^:y 



Simone White, 
Priscilla Cavalca 
and Tiffanv Gobbi 
visit the Coli- 
seum. Tourists 
had to protect 
their belongings 
from the gypsies. 



ITALY 



Carrie Desmond 
and Claudine 
Caracciolo visit 
the Eiffel Tower. 
The structure was 
first on itineraries. 



Dear Mom and Dad, 

Ciao from Florence, Italy! This 
city is absolutely unbelievable! 
Hotel Tirreno is situated on a 
small unassuming street in the 
outskirts of the city,15-minute 
walk from the center, where a 
multitude of activities take place 
daily. 

Walking to class we pass shop- 
keepers sweeping their store- 
fronts and small cafes where we 
can stop for a five minute 
cappuccino. We have already 
found the best gelateria (Italian 
ice cream store). It's right near the 
Ponte Vecchio, an old covered 
bridge with a plethora of jewelry 
stores on it- a gold lover's dream! 
Everyday the city "closes down" 
from noon to 3:00 so that every- 
one can go home to eat and rest. 
And the nightlife here at the local 
discos is incomparable. Life in 
Florence is so different from life 
in the States! 



Our incredible itinerary this se- 
mester includes Milan, Venice, 
Rome, Pompeii. We see the origi- 
nals of what we study in art his- 
tory, like works by Giotto and 
Michelangelo. We visit the places 
that Italian poets wrote about, we 
visit the churches where music 
was born, and of course we get to 
practice our Italian everywhere. 

The Italians are warm people 
if we are willing to try to fit in. 
Most like to practice their English 
as much as we try to practice our 
Italian. It was difficult to adapt to 
all of the cultural changes at first; 
but I have come to consider this 
city my home, the Italians my 
neighbors, and any new tourists, 
"foreigners!" 

Well, 1 am off to discover more. 
I miss you all a lot, but I am hav- 
ing the time of my life! CIAO! 
Love, 
Tiffany Gobbi 







1 ^^»'^!r^*^ 



OFF THE WALl 



St. Malo sunset 

was worth an 

audience. 

Spectacular 

scenery was 

treasured by the 

travellers. 



32 



PURE VENICE! 

-^ 

Gondolas line the 

"street" near San 

Marco Square. 

Visitors often 

discovered the 

charm of Venice 

on a gondola ride 

through the canals 

of the enchanting 

city. 



Studies Abroad 



IS IT REAL? 

^ 

Stephanie 
Popham, 
Claudine 
Caracciolo, Liz 
Mason, Carrie 
Desmond, Sherry 
Carlton and 
Jennifer Grossman 
enjoy a photo 



picturesque 
Riquewihr, 
France. Group 
trips brought the 
students close 
together as they 
experienced 
German-French 
culture. 




FRANCE 



Cher maman et papa, 

Salut! My semester abroad 
has been the best experience of 
my life. I know, what a cliche- but 
it's true! In class we learn through 
experience- we' ve been to the Lou- 
vre, Musee d'Orsay and Musee 
Marmottan with art class; we've 
had champagne, wine, cheese and 
chocolate tastings in gastronomy; 
we've seen a Toulouse-Lautrec 
exhibit with civilization; we've 
gone to Versailles with history 
class; and we've had political sci- 
ence class with a professional 
broadcast journalist. For our two 
weekend trips, we went to the 
Alsace-Lorraine region and to the 
Loire Valley. Everyone became 
close friends during these week- 
ends spent together. The rest of 
our weekends we've been travel- 
ling throughout Europe. Our 
memoires now include the Win- 
ter Olympics in Albertville, 
France, World's Fair in Sevilla, 
Spain, the famous film festival in 
Cannes, France, and the 
Carnivale- much like Mardi Gras- 
in Venice, Italy. Some of the coun- 
tries on our itineraries are En- 
gland, Ireland, Switzerland, Bel- 
gium, Austria, Czechoslavakia, 
Germany, Holland, and Greece. 
Thank you so much for making 
this dream possible! Au revoir! 
Love, 

Carrie Desmond 



EURO-POLITICS 



The political 
science class visits 
the Council of 
Europe in 
Strasbourg, 
France. Professor 
Daniel Leconte, a 
broadcast 
journalist 
provided his class 
with the 

opportuniy to see 
the workings of 
french media and 
politics. 



Studies Abroad 



33 



$PAIN 

Dear Mom and Dad, 

I just finished having a cup 
of cafe con leche in the Plaza 
Mayor with some of my Spanish 
friends, and I thought I would 
drop you a line to catch-up on my 
experiences here the last few 
months. I can't believe spring has 
come to Salamonca and the dry, 
chilling air has a hint of warmth 
now. The plaza was beautiful to- 
day and people were out strolling 
and drinking their usual evening 
coffee. The sun felt wonderful and 
highlighted the pinkish stone in 
the plaza incredibly well. 

Our group returned from a trip 
to the World's Fair Sunday night- 
I wish I could have ventured into 
the city of Seville. The Expo was a 
great place to see different cul- 
tures brought together and to try 
some international cuisine. I guess 
I already had my taste of 
Andalusian culture earlier this se- 
mester when we travelled to 
Granada and the southern tip of 
Spain. 1 cannot get over how dif- 
ferent each region of the country 
is. Each is beautiful and geo- 
graphically diverse- and so many 
distinct dialects exist. But one 
thing never changes, and that is 
the genuine warmth of the Span- 
ish people. It will be very difficult 
to leave my friends here behind. 
Hasta Luego, 
Jenny Rissler 



WALES K 



THE SCHOOL 

^ 

The institution fits 
in with the 
Spanish architec- 
ture. JML 
students abroad 
studied here. 



The sun shines in 

Tenby, Wales for 

the group trip. 

Weekend trips 

were a time for 

bonding and 

sightseeing. 

CUISINE 



Jennifer Schwatka 

dines with a 

Spanish friend. 

JMU stvidents 

enjoyed the 

opportunity to 

dine with the 

natives and taste 

the best food 

Spanish culture 

has to offer. 











^ ^Wto*»?.>. 




Wm- 1 W'^ --^ 


■^^- 1 ,1 |.i _ 



OLE 



JMU students visit 
with the Span- 
iards in costume 
Cultural attire 
was a perfect 
subject for photos. 



^ L^ Studies Abroad 






UNREAL 



AlinuiiJiy 




MounDig 



The group poses 
in front of the 
ancient historical 
phenomenon, 
Stonehenge. 
London students 
were fortunate 
enought to visit a 
place most 
students only read 
about in text- 
books. 

BIKIN ■ IT 



These travelers 
prepare to tour 
the landscape of 
Ireland. Bikes 
were a popular 

method of 

sightseeing for 

train-weary 

voyagers. 

ENGLAND 

Hello from foggy old London- 
town. Ok, ok, so the weather here 
certainly is not the most enviable 
aspect of this city, but everything 
else here is absolutely wonderful! 
Our classes are so interest- 
ing and our British professors are 
great! Almost every day we take 
class "field trips", which provide 
hands-on experience and add a 
great deal to what we learn in the 
classroom. We go to museums, 
concerts, plays, parliament, and 
churches. 

Our home is Madison House, a 
two-hundred year-old hotel in 
Bloomsbury, in London's West 
End. Almost any of the city's at- 
tractions can be reached with less 
than a 20-minute walk: the British 
Museum, Trafalgar Square, Con- 
vent Garden, Piccadilly Circus, 
Big Ben, and Parliament. The 
"tube" and the buses are part of 
London's great public transpor- 
tation system. 

Our group has visited 
Stratford, Bath, Oxford, Brighton, 
Cambridge, and Tenby, Wales. 
These weekend trips have taught 
me about England's history and 
culture. 

Sorry I must cut this short, but 
the pubs down the street are beck- 
oning. Say hello to JMU for me! 
Cheers! 

Kristen Auclair 



Studies Abroad ^ ^ 



PRESENTATION 

^ 

President Carrier 
presents the 
outstanding 
alumni award 
during the 
halftime cer- 
emony. 




HOMECOMINO 




The return of the graduates was one of the most Madison's freshest alumni feU for the first time the 

anticipated weekends of the fall semester. Recently difference between belonging and returning, 
graduated alumni came back to JMU to reminisce Class of 92 graduate Sheila McDevitt mused, 

and catch up "It's so strange to be back here and not completely 




.■Tix>.Tc. ■■-*s?,'^-a'^...EVinKwaHnw 



last to enjoy the 
weekend as a full-fledged student. This year the 
Indian summer weather completed the perfection 
of the reunion. 

Saturday began with cars piling into P-Lot across 
from the Business Building to tailgate before the 
game. Truck beds with coolers and picnic baskets 
filled the lotsand fields. Wandering through Godwin 
field looking for their organizations and friends. 



where the studehfs""ifncf alumni ccniTcTlTTeetT 1 ne 
Row was inundated with people having parties, 
barbeques, bands, and Greek family reunions. The 
football game attracted fans and socializers. The- 
ater and music groups entertained and reUgious 
organizations held special services. The campus 
was alive with activity and excitement as the old 
meshed with the new. 

-Carrie Desmond 



Two JMU alumni 

join the Marching 

Royal Dukes and 

perform during 

the half time 

show. The alumni 

marching band 

played before a 

crowd at the 

Homecoming 

game. 



Q ^ Homecoming 




LOUNGING 

^ — 

These students 
enjoy lounging 
around while 
tailgating during 
the Homecoming 
Football game. 
Tailgating was 
popular with 
students and 
alumni. 




WHAT? 



"It's great to be 
back for a visit, 
but I love what 
I'm doing now 
and icouldn't 
trade any of it 
for a fifth year 

of college. " 
-Tanya 

MacCarthy, 
alunuia 




Kennv Sims fends 
off Northeastern 

players and 

attempts to gain 

yardage. Sims 

rushed 182 yards 

during the game. 



Homecoming 




Ifoyie 



REUNION 

^ 

1985 graduates 
John and Tammv 
Browning and 
their future 
Puppv Pounder 
Nicholas visit 
campus during 
\ lomecoming. 
Many alumni 
returned to JMU 
to discover new 
happenings on 
campus and 
within the JMU 
community. 

FUN TIMES 



Members of the 
Washington 
Alumni Chapter 
hold a reception 
in honor of new 
alumni. The 
chapter held 
many get- 
togethers for old 
and new alumni 
to get acquainted. 

HIGH HONORS 



Alumni Ann 

Duncan speaks at 

a reception held in 

her behalf as 

President Carrier 

looks on. Ms. 

Duncan received 

the award for her 

achievements and 

her service to the 

university. 



1,000 POINTS. 



Anticipating 
graduation, JMU 
seniors partake in 
the Alumni 
Candlelight 
Ceremony. 
Students gained 
their alumni 
status on the eve 
of graduation. 




WHAT? 

"My philosophy 
is 'Once a 

Duke, always a 
Duke. " 

-Brian Reynolds 
'86 graduate 



38 



Alumni 




I"^^ 



V\<L>>. 








ir--u (if Uniivr'-ihf Relations 



ALMA MATER 



There comes a time when one must say good-bye 
to college life, when one must move on to bigger and 
better things and claim alumni status. And al- 
though physically no longer a part of campus, any 
alumni would agree that ties with JMU are never 
broken. 

"Whether you go to graduate school or get a job, 
the bonds and loyalty to JMU will always be there. 
It's kind of like family — regardless of how deter- 
mined you are to move on, there's always some- 
thing pulling you back to the comfort of the Univer- 
sity community," commented 1992 alumni Lisa 
Omahundro. 

"I still keep in touch with one of my old room- 
mates; we call each other at least once every few 
months and have done so for almost fifty years," 
adds Jane Lowe, who attended the University in 
1947 when it was known as Madison College. 

For hundreds of alumni, remaining part of the 
JMU community was simply inevitable. Many chose 
to join alumni chapters to keep in touch with friends 
and to continue to serve the University. There were 
nineteen chapters dispersed all over the east coast 
from New York to Georgia. 

According to Sarah Schaefer, director of Alumni 
Relations, "Being part of an alumni chapter is a 
great way to keep up with the growth of the univer- 




sity, especially if you move out of state after gradu- 
ation." 

Although alumni chapters gathered to socialize 
and to attend sporting events, they also served the 
JMU community by contributing to trusts and by 
raising dona tions. Several chapters also gave recep- 
tions in behalf of area high school 
seniors who were accepted to 
JMU. 

But even if one did not belong 
to an alumni chapter, there were 
other ways to keep in touch with 
college life. "Homecoming is a 
popular event that attracts hun- 
dreds of alumni each year," com- 
mented Special Events director 
Joe Urgo. In recent years, special activities, such as 
golf outings and picnics, have been planned specifi- 
cally for alumni who return to campus for Home- 
coming weekend. 

Whether it be by joining an alumni chapter or by 
simply visiting campus every once in a while, alumni 
revived memories of their undergraduate or gradu- 
ate days spent at JMU. 

-Cindy Scott 



SKINS 

Members of the 
Washington 
Akimni Chapter 
assemble to cheer 
on the Washing- 
ton Redskins. 
Chapters often 
gathered to watch 
athletic events. 



after the 
'burg 



Alumni 



39 




GERONIMO! 



An Outing Club 

adventurer takes 

one last look at 

the top before she 

plunges down the 

mountain. A rush 

of adrenaline and 

the scenery of the 

Seneca Rocks 

provided ideal 

conditions for 

rock climbing. 





tBcW 






i>((r/(M/<'f llu- Muii-~<<i! ( hiluf- Club 



40 



Outdoor Activities 




OETTINAWAY 





WHAT? 



When the pressures of college life left you feeling 
a bit overwhelmed, there was a simple and inexpen- 
sive solution. Escape to the great outdoors. The 
Shenandoah Valley had a plethora of places for 
students to enjoy the beauty and splendor of nature. 



romantic than snuggling up to watch a beautiful 
sunset? However, making it up the mountain some- 
times presented a problem. "As a senior, 1 had never 
made it to the top of Reddish Knob. I got stuck on the 
side of the 




enjoying the 
great outdoors 



sophomore 



LIGHT MY FIRE 

Junior Matt 
Schwabel and 
senior Lynette 
Chewing spend 
time over Fall 
Break exploring 
the great 
outdoors. 
Students found 
camping to be a 
peaceful escape. 



ne siienanaoan vaiiey. vv nenever my scnooiwori< 
gets too stressful, I take off for Skyline Drive and 
hike up Bearface. You can't imagine the sense of 
calming and perspective you get when sitting in the 
peak of a mountain and staring at the Valley sprawl- 
ing to the horizon," explained junior Matt Schwabal. 

If you wanted natural beauty, but did not want to 
pay Skyline Drive's five dollar entrance fee then 
Reddish Knob was ideal. The Knob, as it was known 
to most people, provided an excellent place to watch 
the sunset. The road up the mountain left something 
to be desired, but the view at the top was well worth 
the unpaved and pothole-laden road. 

For some students, the Knob was a way to relieve 
the burdens of college life. "There is no better way 
to get away from the stress of the real world and to 
get in touch with yourself or your friends then to go 
hang out at the top of the Knob and catch the beauty 
of a sunset," said senior Seth Weinburg. 

Reddish Knob was also a great place to try and 
impress that special girl or guy. What was more 



er fnat 

night, 1 should have known, " explained senior Beth 
Pugh. 

For those students who chose to stay closer to 
campus, there were several parks nearby. "I like 
walking around the track because it gives me time 
to catch up with my friends. It's nice because it is 
close," said senior Melissa Stevens. 

While some preferred the proximity, others liked 
the quiet atmosphere of the park. Commented se- 
nior Moe McGovern, "I run through the park be- 
cause it seems less hectic. It is inspiring not to see all 
the civilization around. I also go just to play on the 
playground to get away from being a student." 

Whether it was a long drive through scenic Sky- 
line Drive, a trip up to Reddish Knob to see the 
sunset or just a visit to the park, outdoor activities 
were a great way to relieve the stress that went with 
being a college student. 

-Anna Selden 



AIRBORNE 

Matt Shaffer, Jay 
Henry and Matt 
Daw brave the 
ice-cold waters of 
Blue Hole. The 
swimming hole 
gave students a 
break from the 
daily grind. 




WATER WAYS 



Members of the 

Outing Club float 

down the 

Shenancioah 

Ri\-er. Tubers 

found excitement 

searching for the 

eternal rapid. 



nirtc^if of Maiit^ou Oiitiij;;^ Chi ' 



Outdoor Activities Z^ ^ 



ITS A BREEZE 

»•= 

Breeze editor 
Christy Mumford 
and Managing 
editor Gavle 
Cohen take a 
break while 
working on the 
newspaper. Thi 
breeze was a bi 
weekly newspa- 
per available tci 
theJMU commu- 
nity. 




STANDOUT 



Students made a direct impact on the quality of 
life at JMU. Many of those students were campus 
leaders. They headed student organizations such 
as Student Government Association, E.A.R.T.H., 
social and professional greek organizations and 
other interest-driven clubs. Not only did they lead 
other students to new heights, but these students 
contributed countless hours to the JMU and 
Harrisonburg communities to improve the essence 
of life for all persons involved or touched by JMU. 
Each campus leader offered a different approach. 
"My main goal was to teach students how to be- 
come involved," said Star Wilbraham, senior inter- 
national business major and President of Council of 
Campus Leaders. "In my time 
here students have shown that 
they will get involved in any- 
thing important to them, but the 
logistics make it difficult. So my 
desire is to give those students 
the means and the information to 
become the leaders, not to follow 
me but to walk with me." 

"Leadership by example 
has always worked for me," said 
Andy Wiley, a senior finance, political science and 
marketing major and the General Student Manager 
at Gibbons Dining Hall. "I have always followed 
the Star Trek creed that says — to do what no one 
else can and go beyond my expectations of myself. 
Each person has to find the person they want to 
answer to inside themselves. You can't depend 
upon anyone but yourself to give you the motiva- 
tion to be the best." 




campus 
leaders 



Danny Cruce, SGA President said, "Making an 
impact requires empowerment and education. My 
responsibility is to give a voice to student concerns 
and utilize the proper channels to make a differ- 
ence." The SGA publicized the importance of Vir- 
ginia Education Bond issue, held its Second An- 
nual Student Faculty Relations Forum and offered 
assistance throughout the early Fall semester to 
register voters for the national elections. 

"The strongest element of JMU is the student 
body and their desire to make a difference," said 
Debi Harrison, president of the Panhellenic Coun- 
cil and sister of Alpha Sigma Tau. "There was a 
large movement this year to unify the JMU student 
body and the greek system, not to down-play com- 
petition but to promote unity, strength and pride in 
JMU." The largest contributions by the Panhellenic 
Council has been the increased emphasis on jomt 
service projects with Inter-fraternity Council and 
the Black Greek Caucus, such as Citizens Against 
Sexual Assault and the hurricane relief movement 
in September. 

The purpose of any leader is to contribute char- 
acter, drive and desire to a project, to organize and 
to infect others with their enthusiasm. But the main 
contribution of the JMU campus leaders has been 
to give the rest of the student body the voice and the 
tools to make changes all the while standing back 
and waiting for the fireworks to begin. As SGA 
President Danny Cruce and Star Wilbraham both 
said, the goal of any good leaders is empowerment 
of those they lead and at JMU that is through 
extensive education. 

-Cheryl Windham 



DEBATE 

SGA Senators give 
lull attention to 
the introduction 
of a new bill. The 
Student Govern- 
ment Association 
was modeled after 
the country's own 
democratic form 
of government. 



UP FRONT 



SGA President 

Danny Cruce 

presides over a 

senate meeting. 

The meetings 

were held to 

inform students 

and to receive 

input concerning 

student affairs. 




WHAT? 



"The strongest 

element of ]MU 

is the student 

body and their 

desire to make a 

difference. " 

-Debi Harrison 

senior 



^s^^4gr^^f 



HELPING HAND 



Student Ambassa- 
dors help out lost 
freshmen on 
move-in day. The 
Ambassadors 
handed out 
information 
pamphlets as well 
as directing 
students to their 
dorms. 



\ 



AQ Campus Leaders 



ne New 



READY...LAUGH 

Comedian Marlin 
Smith performed 
at tlie playtair for 
freshmen. Smith, 
who was from 
Berkley, Cahfor- 
nia, traveled over 
the country giving 
presentations to 
college freshmen. 




Ma^iii 



Campus Leaders A O 



MIDNIGHT SUN 



The midnight sun 

sets on the Kasilof 

River, located on 

the Kenai 

Peninsula. We 

spent time here 

fishing for the 

famous Alaskan 

King Salmon. 




A seagull is 

silhouetted 

against the setting 

sun in Homer, a 

small fishing town 

on beautiful 

Katchemak Bay. 



LION AROUND 

Sea lions sun 

themselves upon 

the rocky 

shoreline of 

Resurrection Bay. 



MILES TO GO 

We hitchhiked 

about 2000 miles 

during the course 

of the summer. 



Seward 
Anchorage 147 






44 



Alaska 




ACIAL DRIFT 



,' floes would 
iiain frozen 

A Sid throughout 

7 t' summer. 

[• /though 
tnperatures 
I iched the 70's 
iring June iind 
J y, higher 
i itudes were 
s iw-covered all 
\hr long. 



FAR & AWAY 





PPLE HAZE 



sea of purple 
pme lies in the 
llev of an 
askan mountain 
nge. With 
nsecutive 18+ 
ur days, the 
id seems to 
ring to life 
ernight. 



AT PORT 

oats find rest in 
ward Harbor on 
esurrection Bay. 
This beautiful 
astal town is the 

home port to 
any commercial 

fishing boats. 



Alaska. To most people our forty-ninth state is 
one of mystery and intrigue. Seperated from the 
lower forty-eight, it exists in a world of its own, a 
world not of traffic and smog, but of peace and 
tranquility. Those who dare to venture northward 
find a land forgotten by time that remains primarily 
und cxelcped. Forest^ tliat ha\o iu'\ or ccl ioed the 

of a chainsaw spread out as far as the 
see and the mountains seem to reach the heavei 

Last summer I packed up my tent and headei 
north with five friends in search of a job in the 
Alaskan commercial fishing industry. The work 
was hard and the hours were long ~ twelve- to 
sixteen- hour days were not unusual. There were 
mornings when I woke up and mv hands were so 
swollen 1 could not even make a fist. When the day 
was done, however, I would walk down to the 
ocean and see beluga whales passing by or look up 
and see bald eagles soaring overhead. Living this 
close to nature gave me a different perspective on 
life, one in which the chaos and material needs of 
everyday life had no place. The people of Alaska 
reflected this attitude and led their lives at a pace 
which was slower, simpler. I kept a journal while 
living in Alaska, here are some of the moments that 
are most memorable: 
May 20 

It is 11:15 p.m. and the sun is just setting on my 
first night in Alaska. The sky is a goldeii amber and 
the mountains surrounding Anchorage are 
silhoutted against the northern sky. It is all I've ever 
dreamed of. 
hme 10 

Tonight we're in Seward, a quiet little fishing 
town on the southern tip of the peninsula. We 



found out there wouldn't be work for a few days so 
we packed up our gear and hitchhiked the 200 miles 
to get here, which took about five hours. We thought 
we'd sleep out vmder the stars tonight, but as we're 
quickly learning it rains just about everyday here on 
the coast. Forty 
degrees and 




Alaska enchants 
working students 



'11 

Rnd 
some shelter. 
Imw 21-Mid- 
tiight 

The summer 
solstice. To- 
night 1 see why 

Alaska is called the Land of the Midnight Sun. The 
sun has just set and although it is overcast, it is still 
quite light out. Tonight, just as many nights before, 
there is no darkness, just a light grey as the sun 
prepares to rise again in a few hours. 
Iuhi27 

It is now the peak of the salmon run and we have 
found work set-netting on Cook Inlet. We work 
twelve hours on, sleep for six, and then twelve on 
again pulling in nets full of red salmon. The work is 
hard but rewarding and the pay is great. Hopefully 
the run will keep up and we'll be able to work into 
mid-August... 

The experience taught me a lot about myself and 
what I am truly capable of doing in life. The Alaskan 
experience presents a whole new attitude on life, for 
Alaska is not just a state, but a state of mind. 

-Matt Humke 






SILOUETTES 



The sunsets were 
one of the most 
spectacular sights 
in Alaska. 



PURPLE & GOLD 



Mount Spur 
looms over Cook 
Inlet. The 
mountain erupted 
while we were 
working in North 
Kenai, sending a 
plume of ash 
40,000 feet into the 
air less than ten 
miles from our 
camp. 



Alaska 



45 




AND 2 MORE! 



JMU Aerobics 

instructor 

Claudine 

Caracciolo leads 

an aerobics class 

at Godwin Gym. 



PUMPING UP! 



Jay Nunemaker 

grimaces as he 

completes his 

workout in the 

Godwin weight 

room. Students 

had the option of 

using the five 

weights in the 

weight room or 

the eight weights 

in the wellness 

center. 




Giulfo^J 



^O Fitness 




WHAT? 



3eiiig ill shapie 
'takes you feel 
good about 
yourself" 

-Rob Singer, 
senior 



SHAPE IT UP 




i 



J 



^GHH! 

nior Jim 
lomas uses the 
ill machine in 
e wellness 
nter. The Cybex 
achines enabled 
adents to do 
cuit training 
ith weights. 



In the increasingly health conscious world even 
JMU students were becoming more and more con- 
cerned with their physical and overall well being. 
One of our prime concerns, and means of relaxation, 
was fitness. On campus there were a multitude of 
options where health enthusiasts went to work out. 

The Wellness Center offered a variety of options 
for students trying to keep in shape. Exercise equip- 
ment ranged from cycles and rowing machines to 
cardiovascular and circuit machines. Mats and 
ample floor space allowed for individual exercises. 
Sophomore Sarah Allen said, "1 go work out when- 
ever I can, but there are usually a lot of people there 
in the evenings and it's too crowded to do any- 
thing." The center was usually busiest from 3pm 
until 7pm, with the longest lines at the Cybex ma- 
chines. 

In addition, the Wellness Center offered fat, 
muscle tone and endurance testing for students that 
wanted to plan fitness programs. "It's not just a 
place to work out," said Tracy Stewart, an employee 
at the center since its opening last January. "We 
offer more services than people realize." Employ- 
ees were trained and tested on all of the center's 
facilities. The Wellness Center was open to faculty 
and staff only from 5:30am to 7am and then opened 
to students from 7am until 11 pm Monday through 
Thursday. 

Other fitness options on campus included weight 
rooms and aerobics classes. There were four weight 



health and ^H 

fitness at JMU 



rooms, located in Godwin, Logan, Bridgeforth Sta- 
dium and Hillside. While the room in Bridgeforth 
Stadium was reserved for athletic training, the ma- 
jority were also available to students. Aerobics 
classes were of- 
fered in -■•»-'»r~ . . »»... .r . , .n. . n.. .. . . . ..n.. rny -. . . r ., .» ^ ^^^ ^ 

Godwin and 
Hillside. 
Classes ranged 
from low im- 
pact to ad- 
vanced step 
aerobics. Jun- 
ior Andrea 

Bryant said, "The step aerobics classes I've been to 
here were very invigorating." 

Students that lived off campus were sometimes 
members at gyms in Harrisonburg, including Iron 
World and Women's Fitness. Most students, how- 
ever, preferred to come back to campus to work out. 
Sophomore Jeff Gothelf said, "1 usually lift for a 
while everyday. The Fitness Center has a lot of good 
machines, except they're usually crowded." 

Whether trying to get in shape or stay that way, 
students found that the fitness options the school 
offered met their needs. The variety of the equip- 
ment and the different atmospheres pleased both 
the serious trainer and the occasional athlete. 

-Colleen Magin 





CRUISIN' 

Students read, 
listen to music 
and chat while 
riding the 
lifecycles in the 
wellness center. 



wTwr 

DETERMINED 



Senior Rob Singer 
powers through 
Delaware for a 

biathlon. Running 
and biking were 

common ways to 
stay in shape. 



Fitness M" / 



PARTY SCENE 



T! 



For those determined to find a party, there was 
always something happening. Parties were held 
everywhere - in dorms, (registered with the hall 
director, of course) on Greek Row and off campus. 
A party was a great place to meet 
new people and relieve a little 
stress. As "ice-breakers", drink- 
ing games were a great way to 
make new friends. Games in- 
cluded Shoulders, Beer Pong and 
various card games like Spades 
and Hi/Low. 

Many students agreed that 
theme parties were the best kind 
of party. Fraternities and sororities often had par- 
ties with themes such as North of the Border (flannel 
and work boots), early 80's (Madonna wanna-be's 
and Michael Jackson impersonators), and Graffiti 
parties where everyone wore white T-shirts and 
came armed with a magic marker. Junior Julie Bragg 
had fun at an early 80's party at Pi Kappa Phi, "Early 
80's parties are great because you dress the way you 
did when you were growing up and you thought 
you were cool." However, Greeks weren't the only 




relieving 
stress 



theme partiers. Students living in Hunters Ridge 
had three annual theme parties - the purple party, a 
50's party and a toga party. "If you get into the 
theme of the party it's really fun. Like, for the toga 
party, we not only dressed in togas, but someone 
carried the torch and we all had Greek names and 
played 'Olympic' games," said junior Randi Gische. 
Allison Lucente, also a junior, added, "For the 50's 
party, we dressed in poodle skirts and bobby socks 
and the guys greased their hair and put cigarettes 
behind their ears, and we danced to 50's times all 
night long." Sophomore Frank Sparacino attended 
a costume party, "It was cool because the costumes 
give you a good reason to start conversations with 
people you don't know." 

All in all, it seemed that partying at JMU was 
considered an art form. Partiers took their week- 
ends (Thursday through Sunday) very seriously, 
scouting the hot spots and cool people. People kept 
their eyes and ears open for the party gossip and 
found a jam-packed theme or a small soiree. What- 
ever students did, they were out there meeting as 
many people as possible. 

-Kate Oullette 



*.^ 



1 




DUKES PRIDE 

^ 

Sheri Watts, 

Cindv Scott, 

Alison Harris and 

Tommi Curd 

celebrate a 

basketball win. 

Post-game parties 

were popular 

after victories. 



POLYESTER! 



Sophomore 

Michael Everton 

grooves to the 70's 

tunes at the Little 

Grill, Students 

donned all types 

of 70's fashions for 

the party. 




^Q Parties 





WHAT? 



"Straight up, 

]MUhnsthe 

best parties I've 

ever been to. 

They have 
something for 

everyone. " 
-Jake Peebles, 

sopJwniore 



BOOGIE 



Kristi Shackelford 

and Mary 

Katherine Wall 

get down to the 

70's music at the 

Little Grill. Theme 

parties allowed 

students to find 

creative outfits 

and show off their 

threads. 



INCOGNITO 



"Cat Woman", 

"Dolly Parton" 

and a country gal 

talk to friends at a 

Halloween party. 

This year, many 

students had 

Halloween parties 

and then went to 

the Convo to the 

Midnight 

Madness show. 




GETTIN' DOWN 



Nathan Griggs, 
dressed in drag, 
and Taunya 
Martin dance at 
the Little Grill. 
Theme parties 
were an interest- 
ing alternative to 
the more normal 
campus parties. 



Magin 



Parties ^^ 



REACHINOOUT 




The goal of the Center for Service-Learning was 

to integrate service with learning, according to CS- 

L Program Assistant Cathy Hamlin. The agency 

placed 1,400 students a semester with local agencies 

seeking volunteers. In the past 

five years, CS-L has grown from 

working with five agencies to over 

sixty agencies. 

Faculty involveinent aided 
1 the growth of CS-L according to 

1^ O r\ ir\ I ^ Hamlin . Professors often required 
^ j^ corraiiunity service for a variety 

of classes including Freshman 
Seminar. Junior Sheri Yoho said, 
"1 started doing community ser- 
vice for my Third World Cultures class and got so 
much out of it, I joined a service fraternity." 

While the initiative to volunteer may have come 
from a class requirement or as an obligation to an 
organization, there were other reasons for students 
to be involved. Service Chair of Alpha Phi Omega, 
Mike Ogilvie, said students saw that service needed 




serving 
e 



to be done, they felt a sense of duty, it helped them 
appreciate what they had, and it made them feel like 
a part of the community. "When people say that 
Harrisonburg is a ruce town they know that they 
had a part in making it that way." 

The impact of service done by JMU students was 
easy to see in Harrisonburg, whether it was through 
Adopt-A-Highway, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, or 
Mercy House. Last year the university itself decided 
to take over a "Very Special Arts Festival" which in 
previous years had been organized by the JMU 
Council for Exceptional Children. 

Some benefits of service were not as easily recog- 
nized. Junior Ginny Mason developed a special 
friendship with an elderly resident that she began 
visiting her freshman year. Graduate student Stacey 
Gische described a feeling of coming home after 
returning to volunteer with the Association for Re- 
tarded Citizens. She hugged and thanked the per- 
son who got her involved for giving her the oppor- 
tunity to make her impact through service. 

-Deana Holsington 




MIDNIGHT FOX 



Stacy Beggs tutors 
Jason Michael in 
reading The 
Midnight Fox. 
Stacy worked 
with the Reading 
Center on 
campus. 





WHAT? 



"/ 7/ never 

forget my 

experiences 

working ivith 

the 

Harrisonburg 

community 

through AP'O. 

Ei'cn/one I me 

zims just 

wonderful." 

-Sheri Watts 

senior 



PLAY FOR LIF 



Dr. Carrier an 

Lefty Driesell pla 

basketball fc 

Hoops For LIf( 

Hoops For Li 

which wa 

sponsored b 

Sigma Nu, raise 

funds for Mf 

INSPIRATION 

^ 

This JMU Studen- 
teaches and 
inspires a young 
resident at Mercy 
House. Mercv 
House was a 
shelter that aided 
displaced familie: 



WE DID IT! 

Members of 
AKPsi sponsor a 
basketball team 
every season. 
AKPsi was a 
business fraternit 
that was dedi- 
cated to commu- 
nity service. 



^ (J Community Service 



HOPPER 




Community Service ^ ^ 



ROCK HARD 



Lee Hopkins 

studies sedimenty 

rock formations in 

a stratigraphy lab. 

The Geology 

department 

offered a yariety 

of laboratories. 




Holic 



IDEOLOOIES 




The College of Letters and Sciences was the home 
to fourteen different disciplines at JMU. The heads 
of these departments were spread out in seven 
Bluestone buildings surrounding the Quad. This 
College offered a wide variety of interdisciplinary 
and degree-seeking programs. 

The charm of the College of Letters and Sciences 
was that the programs were based in the develop- 
ment of a well-rounded student, a fundamental of 
the old-school mentality. Even though it focused on 

what seems as 
the ancient 




college of letters 
and sciences 



ways, it offered 
an irreplaceable 
tool for under- 
standing the 
world as it de- 
veloped and 
changed before 
our eyes. In an 
academic year of global turmoil in Eastern Europe 
and Central Asia, there was a need to learn why 
there were so many conflicts, and how we should 
approach them. 

The convenient Quad location was also a benefit 
granted to the College of Letters and Sciences. "In 
my Geography 120 class we often had class on the 



quad to experience the reality of geography accord- 
ing to my professor," said Rebecca Pickett. The 
ability to walk outside the academic doors onto 
clean grass and under a sunny, cloudless sky of- 
fered a romantic view of education and broke the 
monotony of cinder-block class rooms. This oppor- 
tunity was also available to anthropology, biology, 
archeology and geology majors through their week- 
end investigations of the surrounding Shenandoah 
area. 

Another advantage of the College of Letters and 
Science was the rotation of "exchange professors." 
This academic year, JMU students studying French 
were able to enjoy the experiences of two professors 
from the Caribbean Island of Martinique. "Their 
teaching style was very rigid, but necessary if you 
want to advance to 300 level French classes. But the 
most interesting factor was their unusual grasp of 
American idiomatic expressions/' said Tricia 
Johnson, a sophomore English major. 

"I've found that the sense of history 1 feel when 
living and taking classes in the Bluestone buildings 
on the quad gives me a feeling of belonging... a 
feeling that says that 1 am a part of something with 
an interesting past and a well-defined future," said 
Mike Arney, a senior history major. 

-Cheryl Windham 



WHAT? 



"The College of 

Letters and 

Sciences 

afforded me the 

freedom to 
explore a career 
without the 
pressure of a 
srigid pro- 
gram." 
-John Rogers 
senior 



CONCOCTION! 






Senior Stevi 

Frazier mixes ■ 

Rheniun 

compound ini 

chemistry lab 

Rhenium is usM 

as a molecula 

reporter because! 

gives off light ii 

ditferen 

en\'ironments 






^ l2. College of Letters and Sciences 



MAPS 




Emilv Black and 
Erin McDermott 
review their 
astronomy notes. 
The astronomy 
classes were held 
in the plan- 
etarium. 



College of Letters and Sciences ^ j^ 



MARBLEIZED 



Students study in 

the marble 

hallway of Zane 

Showker Hall, the 

Business Building. 

The open halls 

provided ample 

room for students 

to meet or just to 

converse vi'ith 

others 



MONEY TALK 



James Madison University grew substantially in 
the past fifteen years. One of JMU's most visible 
changes was the addition of a centralized location 
for the College of Business. The 1991 Fall semester 

introduced the 
mingling of 




college of 
business 



technology and 
marble in Zane 
Showker Hall. 
The opening of 
this grand sym- 
bol of affluence 
became a 

struggle of edu- 
cation versus image in the months following. "There 
was a definite need to create a new location for the 
College of Business," Julie Woodell, a senior Mar- 
keting major and brother of Alpha Kappa Psi Busi- 
ness Fraternity. 

"Harrison Hall was just too small to meet the 
needs and changes in what was almost thirty per- 
cent of JMU's student population," said Todd Boss, 
a senior Economics major, the Chairman of COB's 
Student Advisory Council and President of Pi Sigma 
Epsilon Business Fraternity. "There was a substan- 
tial concern about separating the campus , but it 
came right down to if the College of Business was 
going to meet the needs of JMU's students that it 
had to move to 'lower' campus." 

Showker Hall "created a professional atmosphere 



that carries into the professionalism of the students 
and the faculty that is expected by the business 
world," stated Todd Boss. "But even as important 
as the aesthetic value of the building is, it is very 
easy to lose sight of the main purpose of the stu- 
dents being here — education," countered Julie 
Woodell. 

The College of Business offered many positive 
things to the whole of JMU's campus. There were 
conference rooms, group study rooms, an up-to- 
date computer laboratory, the Business Informa- 
tion Center with CD-ROM databases, network ac- 
cess to Carrier Library and business periodicals 
and the Copy Center. Everything innovate stu- 
dents could use at their finger tips. 

One of the many advantages offered to business 
students is the Student Advisory board. A group of 
COB student group leaders contributed ideas and 
complaints about curriculum, policies and various 
topics that affect COB students. Also the quality of 
the COB faculty added to the students' ability to 
become better professionals. "A large portion of 
the funds [for Showker Hall] came from members 
of the COB faculty to, in essence, better their work 
environment and offer better opportunities for the 
student body," said Todd Boss. 

The College of Business offered a vision of the 
future, an atmosphere of change and constant chal- 
lenge to all who walked the halls during their 
studies. -Cheryl Windham 



PZ A CoUeg id( Business 





"Shoivker Hall 
ums a greatly 
needed neces- 
sity. . .Harrison 
Hall zms just 
too small. 
-Todd Boss 
senior 



Students study in 
the Business 
Information 
Center. The 
Center was 
available to 
students who 
desired to study 
or to work on 
homework. 

BUSY FRAT 



Angela Firkinsm 
of Pi Sigma 
Epsilon sets up an 
information table 
at Student 
Activities Night. 
Pi Sigma Epsilon 
was one of the 
several Business 
Fraternities 
available to 
Business Majors. 

COMPUTING 

Cathy Robie, 

Corey Mclntyre 

and Todd Wolton 

use the computer 

lab for their 

Accounting and 

Marketing classes. 

A number of 

business classes 

required the use 

of the computers. 



LECTURE SERIES 

Arthur Wyatt, a 
partener of 
Arthur Anderson 
Co. speaks before 
several Account- 
ing majors. Wyatt 
was brought to 
campus by Beta 
Alpha Psi as part 
of the Executive 
Lecture Series. 




College of Business 



55 



PONDERINC 



The college of Education and Psychology com- 
bined the talents of future teachers and profes- 
. sional counse- 




education and 
psychology 



lors. 



T h 



Education de- 
partment 
helped train 
students to be- 
come teachers 
and advisers 
when they 
graduated. By using many education, psychology, 
and individual major courses, the education de- 



partment showed students what being a teacher 
entailed. "I was really amazed with all the education 
and psychology courses required for education 
majors, "commented junior Jeff Mitroff. For each 
different grade section there was a psychology class 
to help the future teacher understand and relate to 
their new students. 

The Psychology department was used by many 
other departments as well as all psychology majors. 
Political science major Stu Strange commented, "My 
abnormal psychology class really helped me under- 
stand the criminal mind." Students also had to take 
a psychology class to meet their liberal studies 
requirements. -Joe Olson 




■ ■■ 

IMM. 



■ ■■ = i li^ 



SCHOOL DAYS 

^ 

Keister Elemen- 
tary School 
provided many 
JMU students 
with the opportu- 
nity to gain 
experience 
teaching. Keister 
was a convenient 
place for 
practicums 
because of its 
close proximity , 
walking distance, 
from the 
university. 





WHAT? 



"/ just love 

student 

teaching, I 

know it 's the 

profession for 

me." 

-Mary Ann 

Tipton 



PRACTICUM 

A future teacher 
interacts with 
one of her pupils. 
Practicums 
allowed students 
to gain hands-on 
experience before 
receiving their 
teaching 
certificates. 



i 



ii 



i» 



UP FRON1 

Uncle Bijai 

teaches psychol 

ogy of humai 

intimacy. Thi 

psychology clas 

drew students or' 

all major' 



C^ Af College of Education and Psychology 



ON THE JOB 

^ _ 

Senior Bridget 
Little reads to her 
first graders in 
Mrs. Hamilton's 
class at Keister 
Elementary. Early 
Childhood 
Education minors 
student taught for 
a full semester 
prior to receiving 
a teaching 
certificate. 




Mii^iri 



College of Education and Psychology f^ ~Y 



■ 




i 


WHAT? 

"y4// 0/ f/ie exf ra 


■ ^ 




a_._)' 


curricular 


1 -^^flr'^j 


■ik 


activities this 


\h^i 


1 


college offers 
really provide 
students with a 


^^^H-g^ .▲ V 


well rounded 






education. I 
learn from botli 
the classes and 

the practical 
activities. " 

-Rick Kerns 






senior 




^^^K^^^^^^'Z: ^^^~jr^ 


^^H^ ^^ 


GROOVIN' 






Will Bowles 
deejays at the 
Little Grill's 70's 
night. Will also 
hosted a WXJM 
show entitled 
"soul food," 
which also 
featured 70's 




a£^ 




music. 






Mds.'M 






BREAKING FREE 



Taking a break 
from classes 
sophomore 
Brandy PhiUips 
and junior Mindy 
Cash appreciate 
the acoustics of 
the outdoors. 
Many Fine Arts 
students tried to 
escape from the 
indoor seclusion 
and practiced 
outdoors. 



TAKING FORM 

^ 

Junior Art major 

Susan Fordsculpts 

and molds clay. 

Susan felt her 

ceramics were 

very "Zen" like. 



V * 



-H.. 





_} O College of Fine Arts and Communication 



EXPRESSION 




V, 



What do Computer Animation, Folk Dance, 
Argumentation and Debate, Orchestra Conduct- 
ing, Itahan Film-making, and make-up have in 
common? These were all classes offered by the 
College of Fine Arts and Communication. 

As any communication student who had 
written a six-page paper analyzing Hammer's 
video "Too Legit 2 Quit" could confirm, there was 
more to the College of Fine Arts and Communica- 
tion than one read in the catalog. The same held 
true for any art student who heard Professor 
Coulter talk about "groovy aesthesticians". 

The catalog read that the college housed the 
departments of art, human communication, mass 
communication, music, theater and dance. This 
year the college sponsored a Festival of the Arts 
and a Fine Arts Series. Also instrumental to the 
college was the presence of visiting scholars, 
resident artists and guest lecturers. 

Students of the arts had to meet special admis- 
sion requirements, including meeting regular 
admission standards, an audition or portfolio 
review, an interview, and letters of recommenda- 
tion. Once admitted they could specialize in areas 



fine arts & 
communication 



such as ceramics or voice within their depart- 
ment. Communication students could choose 
either human or mass communications and 
concentrate in alternative dispute resolution, 
public rela- 
tions or 
telecommuni- 
cations. 

One of the 
essential 
elements of 
the college 
was the 
practicums 

and co-curricular activities it offered. These 
activities not only gave students in the college 
practical experience, they were also good for the 
rest of the JMU population. Co-curricular activi- 
ties included the experimental theater, the 
Marching Royal Dukes, the Breeze, WXJM, Zirkle 
House, the mediation center, and the Virginia 
Repertory Dance Company. 

-Deana Holsington 



^ 





DILIGENCE 


NO LIMIT 


Sophomore 


Reaching for 


Nathan Lyon 


excellence, the 


assists freshman 


dance group 


Lisa Miller with 


members dazzle 


her paints as 


the audience with 


freshman Scott 


their graceful 


Allison sketches 


movements. Long 


his ideas. The 


hours and hard 


three were 


work could could 


working on a 


be seen in their 


project for their 


flawless perfor- 


Design class. 


mances. 



College of Fine Arts and Communication ^ O 



SERVINC 




health and 
human services 



The human body, the human mind and the hu- 
man spirit together made the basis for the College of 
Health and Human Services. 

Learning about the human body was a goal for 

students in the 
Nursing de- 
partment and 
newly formed 
Kinesiology 
department 
(formerly 
Physical Edu- 
cation). 

The 
Nursing Department was known statewide for its 
turnout of excellent students. After two years of 
biology and chemistry classes, nursing students 
began practical training at the hospital and at a free 
clinic. Senior Nursing major Lisa Farrar gained 
experience at the free clinic, where juniors and 
seniors volunteered their services. This program 
enabled students to gain practical and administra- 
tive experience in a real life situation. Farrar said, 
"We're allowed to do everything the nurses do, as 



ICE BABY 



long as someone with authority knows we're doing 
it." 

Meanwhile, the Kinesiology department 
was helping students of all majors discover how to 
help themselves. Through classes such as condi- 
tioning, running, and swimming, students learned 
the benefits of keeping in shape. "Even in my bowl- 
ing class, they talk about physical fitness," said 
Senior Chris Pursell, "we even have to write a 
conditioning paper." 

When combining the concerns of the human 
mind and spirit, JMU's social work department 
took charge. Students with a simple desire to help 
others took on this challenging major. "I believe 
everyone at sometime needs a helping hand," com- 
mented Junior Matthew Koch, "1 just want to be 
there when someone needs it." 

Practicums for fourth year majors and intro- 
ductory courses for first year novices considering 
the field provided students with all the incentive 
they needed through experience. Each subdivi- 
sion of the department worked towards one 
simple principle - helping others increase their 
health, body and soul. - Joe Olson 



Senior Volleyball 

player Wendv 

Miller ices up 

before practice. 

Athletic trainers 

were responsible 

for providing ice 

and taping 

athletes' ankles. 




^ (_) College of Health and Human Services 





WHAT? 



"/ chose 
Nursing 
because I 

wanted to help 
people. " 

-Angela Hall 



PROPERLY SET 

Jennifer Krey and 

Sara Weinberg 

practice setting 

hurt ankles. Both 

students were 

involved with the 

athletic training 

program. 



OUCH! 



Two students 
practice giving 
each other shots. 
The activity was 
part of a lab. 



NEEDLES! 



Heidi Dix 

practices filling a 

svringe in one of 

her nursing 

classes. Nursing 

students had 

numerous 

' laboratories that 

provided 

experience in 

health care. 




^ 



k> 



College of Health and Human Services ^ ^ 



AT WORK 



HICHTECH 




technology 
takes JMU 



The College of Integrated Sci- 
ence and Technology started of- 
fering classes for the first time, 
this fall. Under the direction of 
the Provost, Dr. Lyle C. Wilcox, 
the newest college began admit- 
ting students to its curriculum. 
Approximately fifty students en- 
rolled in 
t h e 
CISAT 
pro- 
gram, 
and en- 
r o II - 
m e n t 
was ex- 
pected 
to increase each semester. 

The construction for the new 
college was still in the planning 
stage, with ground-breaking ex- 
pected to begin in 1994. Until the 
campus for the new college was 
built, many of the courses were 
taught in the former Biology Vil- 
lage. Located on the same side of 
the highway as the Convocation 
Center, the trailers were trans- 
formed into technology centers. 



READY TO GO 



With sophisticated science equip- 
ment and computers to aid in the 
learning process, students began 
to learn how to apply their knowl- 
edge to modern technology. 

The curriculum concentrated 
on applied mathematics and sci- 
ence. This meant using technol- 
ogy to the fullest extent through 
the application of math and sci- 
ence techniques that have been in 
existence for decades. Classes 
from the mathematics and science 
departments were altered to ap- 
ply to the College of Integrated 
Science and Technology. Com- 
puter Science courses were also 
improved to relate to the CISAT 
curriculum. 

While this was the first year 
that courses were offered in 
CISAT, the students in the new 
college were anxiously awaiting 
the construction of the new cam- 
pus. The new college was a way 
to prepare JMU for the twenty- 
first century, and the students 
were excited to be part of the 
school of the future. 

-Kate Travers 



Biology grad 

student Whit 

Harries helps with 

CISAT biology 

experiments. 

Faculty and 

students began 

preparing for the 

college as soon as 

possible. 




Biology grad 
student Mark 
Newsome vs'orks 
on the computer. 
CISAT would 
explore the latest 
advancements in 
technology. 



62 



CISAT 






WHAT? 

"/ think the 
college is 
necessary for 
higher educa- 
tion to stay on 
the cutting edge 
of teclmolog]!, " 
-Mike Allred. 
CS Major 



A NEW LOOK 



Morris Lumpkin 
studies the model 
ofClSAT. 
Students were 
adjusting to the 
idea of a college 
across the 
highway. 



INNOVATION 

-^ 

Junior Tod Fraley 
contemplatesthe 
physiograph. The 
administration 
hoped to lure new 
strudents to the 
college with the 
prospect of 
applied practical 
technology. 



CISAT (53 



•>'*'^''V 



^'^ 



' -i¥?- 



/^^.^ 









;?f-»; 



h 






>•; 




-iN 



BIRD WATCHIN 

^ 

Jodi D'Arby, 

Greg Hawkins 

and Rob Schaefer 

pause to find a 

hidden bird. 

Biking and 

walking gave 

students time to 

see aspects of the 

'Burg not seen by 

those enclosed by 

cars or buses. 



^ Z^ Transit 





WHAT? 



"Riding my 

I hike helps me 

stay in shape 

tand gets me to 

where I'm 

^oing quickly." 

\-Alison Harris 

senior 



'ATHWAYS 



itudents travel 
ilong the gravel 
)ath at the head 
)f the Quad. This 
pathway served 
IS both a foot trail 
ind a bike path. 

SLADES 



his student stays 
shape by rollar 
lading to class, 
reative alterna- 
itives to get to 
lass often proved 
o be more 
ifficient than 
alking. 






MIKE'S BIKE 

Mike Farabaugh 

pauses on his way 

to class to 

socialize vi/ith 

Sarah Coggins. 

Mountain bikes 

were a popular 

way to get around 

campus. 



MOBILITY 




Didn't get that crisp, white BMW for Christmas? 
Never fear! As many students found, a car was not 
a necessity to get to class or to get around the 'burg. 

With all of the construction on campus and around 
town, students found it almost an inconvenience to 
have a car on campus. The Harrisonburg Transit 
System, otherwise known as the bus, was one popu- 
lar option for students, especially commuters. 

"Though the ride is not always as smooth as my 
car, the bus was a great convenience, especially 
since more than one route serviced Hill residents," 
commented The Commons resident Tommi Curd. 
Other complexes located on the Hill included Hunt- 
ers Ridge, Squire Hill and Ashby Crossing. An 
added convenience of the bus? Some routes even 
stopped on upper campus and Showker Hall, which 
made life for students with back to back classes on 
opposite ends of the campus a little less hectic. 

While the bus system certainly was convenient, 
some students preferred a more environmentally 



sound mode of transportation — the bike. Any stu- 
dent would agree that the number of bikes on 
campus has increased dramatically over the last few 
years. Senior Alison Harris rode her mountain bike 
to class because 



it helped her 
keep fit and "it 
was virtually 
impossible to 
find a parking 
space in J-lot af- 
ter 10 a.m." 

More creative 
students chose 

other modes of wheeled transportation, such as 
skate boards and roller blades. While these options 
sometimes proved to be more unusual than busses 
or cars, they were just as reliable. 
-Cindy Scott 



getting around 
the 'burg 




BUSIN' IT 



A student hops off 
at one of the many 
stops along the 
Harrisonburg 
Transit bus route. 
The bus service 
eliminated a lot of 
parking worries 
for off-campus 
students, and was 
a great help to 
those without 
wheels of their 
own when it was 
time for errand 
running. 



Transit 



65 



AVERACEJMU 




the typical 
student 



Rvan Croxton 
graduate student 



Madison students varied in every aspect of their personalities. 
The variety of people was the attracting factor for many of JMU's 
population. Young adults of all different nationalities and back- 
grounds graced the campus and students learned to cope with the 
differences in race and religion as they became more educated and 
less judgmental. Speaking out for causes became 
easier and students expanded their beliefs to 
incorportate new ideas. Rebelliousness was the 
norm and conformity was no longer a security 
blanket. College was the perfect opportunity to 
practice freely the liberty of living away from 
home. Students had no responsibilities other than 
classes, work and bills. These four years were 
prime for meeting people and creating lasting 
friendships. Five students agreed to interview 
with the Bluestone to create an image of a 1992 JMU student. 




Ryan Croxton was a first year Graduate Student from 
Tappahannock, Virginia. He was working towards his master's de- 
gree in English; Ryan chose this particular field of study because he 
enjoyed reading. As an undergraduate here at JMU, he appreciated 
the atmosphere and mountainous setting, as well as the overall 
character of the University community. Because of these factors, Ryan 
chose to remain at JMU to continue his studies. Thus far, Ryan's 
favorite graduate class has been James Joyce. "Ulysses," he said, "was 
quite a challenge, but I loved it!" Ryan worked as a graduate assistant 
in the Faculty Assistance and Academic Advising Offices under Dr. 
William Hall, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs. As a 
graduate assistant, he was responsible for completing an annual 
report, corresponding with various faculty and administrators and 
compiling various reports. During his spare time, which was "quite 
limited," Ryan enjoyed spending time with his girlfriend. 




Jennifer Stone was a senior Psychology major 
with a minor in Early Childhood Education. During 
her spare time, she enjoyed dancing and playing 
sports. Her favorite aspect of JMU was the amiabil- 
ity of the students. Her fondest memory was of 
freshman year when she met her boyfriend at a 
party in Ikenberry Hall, whom she is still dating. 
The reputation of the Education department and 
the size of the school were two factors that influ- 
enced her choice to attend JMU. She lived off 
campus in University Court and student-taught at 
Spotswood elementary school during her senior 
year. She enjoyed working with children and wanted 
to teach upon graduating. Jen described herself as 
very ambitious, organized and motivated. She was 
also very creative. All of these qualities augmented 
her love of children and teaching. 



Greg Kauakaui was a freshman business major 
from Hawaii. He resided in Eagle hall. His favorite 
class was Japanese, which presented a challenge. 
Although Greg did not have a job, his spare time 
was limited. He enjoyed working out and playing 
on an intramural floor hockey team, which made it 
to the finals. Travel to D.C. was an attractive alterna- 
tive to a weekend at JMU. After reading about JMU, 
he decided to attend and was quite satisfied with his 
choice. Greg appreciated the people he met and the 
different aspects of the east coast in comparison to 
the Hawaiian islands. 



I: 



b 



Q Q Average JMU Student 



Karen Gardner 
junior 




Junior Karen Gardner was a 
Human Communications major 
with a concentration in Alterna- 
tive Dispute Resolution. She 
was from Warrenton, Virginia 
and came to JMU sight unseen 
because she had heard good 
reports on the school. She was 
pledging Tri-Sigma sorority and 
worked for the President's 
Cabinet. Her favorite class was 
social welfare because the topics 
of discussion were relevant to 
current issues. Karen lived in 
Gifford Hall and appreciated 
the convenience of having 
classes close by. What she most 
valued about JMU was the 
variety of people on campus. 
Receiving her sorority bid was 
"definitely one of my best 
experiences," Karen reflected. 




Sophomore Kevin Jackson was 
an accounting major from 
Fairfax County. Northern 
Virginia was home to a large 
percentage of JMU students. 
Kevin enjoyed sociology 
because it was a personal class 
in which he learned about 
himself. In his spare time, Kevin 
preferred to play basketball and 
hang out with his friends. He 
came to Madison because his 
friends recommended the 
school and he would advise 
high school seniors to attend 
because "JMU offers a good 
education and a good life 
experience." Living in Hanson 
provided him with the opportu- 
nity to interact with the village 
residents. Kevin particularly 
appreciated the wide variety of 
people he encountered daily. 



Average JMU Student Q y 



.m, - 




i^ST" 







MICKEY D'S 



Kathv Alcorn 

works part-time at 

McDonald's while 

taking classes. 

Several students 

looked off campus 

for work 

opportunities. 




Uclfncr 



68 Jobs 




WHAT? 

'Working as 
business 
ma)iager of 
WXjM giiies 
le the opportu- 
nity to learn 
bout people in 
tndoutofthe 
tsiness world ; 
t's taught me 
^iiore than the 
bottom line. " 
Patrick Belcher 
junior 



iREAK LOOSE 

^K 

Jeniors Lisa 
Jutler and Jill 
/ersen work at 
he game room in 
he Warren 
Zampus Center. 
Students enjoyed 
slaying video 
;ames and 
shooting pool. 



SHOOT ME 

^ 

Senior Vasha 

Hunt works as a 

photographer for 

several student 

publications at 

JMU. Several 

students had jobs 

which allowed 

them to use their 

talents. 

DEEP THOUGHT 



Senior Christine 

1 Carlson edits a 
document. 
Christine worked 
in the Faculty 
Assistance and 
Academic 
Advising Offices 
as a student 
I writer. 



EMPLOYMENT 



Years from now when one looks back on the 
years spent at JMU, recollections of friends, parties, 
good times and jobs might come to mind, jobs?! 
Granted, some means that students employed to 
earn a few dollars were far from the "ideal" job — 
years from now, will anyone really admit that they 
spent countless hours hovering over the grill at 
Burger King? But not all student jobs were as 
menial. Quite a few students were lucky enough to 
find jobs that not only paid well, but were also fun 
and exciting. 

The most popular places to work were, of course, 
student hangouts, such as Spanky's, JM's, and sport- 
ing events. These jobs offered students the opportu- 
nity to gain experience in fields of interest while 
keeping ties intact with friends and fellow students. 

Nathan Lyon, a junior, has worked as a DJ at JM's 
for the last few years. He enjoyed deejaying because 
of his interest in music and because the job permit- 
ted him to earn money while hanging out with 
friends. Though Nathan deejayed several nights a 
week, he favoured Friday night Happy Hour. What 
made Happy Hour so exciting? "People would just 
rush the dance floor and stay there all night. . .it was 
fun just watching everyone," he commented. 

Student Chris Greyard also worked at JM's — as a 
bartender. Though bartending usually required a 
great deal of experience in mixing drinks, JM's beer- 
only policy made tending bar relatively simple. 
Chris agreed with Nathan in that working at JM's 
was a great way to earn money and to ha ve fun at the 
same time. 




Another job that was a favorite among working 
students was managing athletic teams. Senior 
Suzanne Wilson managed the football team. Her 
responsibilities as a manager included maintaining 
equipment and supplying the play- 
ers with water during timeouts. 

Students also enjoyed 
lifeguarding and other outdoor jobs 
such as skiing instructing at the 
nearby Massunutten Ski Resort. 
Such jobs permitted students to tan, 
keep fit and have fun while earning 
spending money. While some stu- 
dents were enjoying the outdoors 
while working, others were indoors 
working as interns in areas related to their major. 
Senior Beth Sopko worked as a writing intern on 
campus for the Associate Vice President of Aca- 
demic Affairs. Beth wrote correspondances to fac- 
ulty members and to members of the University 
community. In addition, she coordinated the Dis- 
tinguished Teacher Award, in which a faculty mem- 
ber is recognized for outstanding service to the 
University. Like most internships offered through 
the University, the jobs were planned to give stu- 
dents the opportunity to gain experience and to 
have fun as well. Beth agreed and said, "I loved 
working with the University. I was able to see the 
framework of the University and how it works. 1 
also enjoyed working with the administrators and 
the other student workers-they were all great." 

-Cindy Scott 



workin' for 
a living 



PRETZEL MAN 



Junior Carl 
Lambert works in 
the Sweets shop at 

P.C.Dukes. 

Several students 

worked at Dukes 

to earn spending 

money. 



X ' L 




Jobs S9 



A TYPICAL SITE 

^ 

The variety of 
fashion state- 
ments seen 
around campus is 
typified by the 
outfits worn by 
Paul Steistom , 
Brian Hutchins, 
Mark Porleth, 
John Dessar and 
Greg Weiss. 




WHAT $ HOT 




Ever-changing fads and stylized fashion prom- 
enaded on JMU's campus this past year. Sweatshirts, 
blue jeans, and tennis shoes were the fashions that 
would never go out of style on campus, but new 
fads moved in for the entire body. 

Baseball hats for men have alw^ays been popular, 
but the women of JMU discovered the joys of this 
Bad-Hair-Day cover-up, in interesting new polka- 
dot and plaid patterns and vibrant new colors. 

Men's and women's hairstyles varied from short 
to long. A newer popular trend for men was long 

hair on the 
top pulled 
back in a po- 
nytail to re- 
veal a 
shaved head 
underneath. 
Women's 
styles were 
diverse and 
individual, 
but one of the more popular styles was long hair 
worn off the forehead. 

Cat-eye sunglasses became popular for the fe- 
male students, taking us back to the good ol' days of 
our parents. Leather necklaces, usually graced with 
colored stones or beads, wound around the necks of 
both men and women. Strings of beads also were a 



the sign of 
the times 



popular form of jewelry that donned not only necks, 
but also wrists and ankles. 

Long-johns under T-shirts and shorts helped to 
take the bite off of chillier days. Many students also 
donned fashionable 3/4 length drawstring parkas 
in an effort to keep warm. 

Blue jeans took a new turn, with the pant legs 
becoming less tapered and un-rolled. New hues 
were introduced and they quickly found their way 
onto the legs of students. Shocking blue, hunter 
green and deep burgundy were only a few of the 
new colors which took their place next to the ever- 
lasting denim blue. 

The shoe fashion had a lot of variety and there 
were many popular styles. Hiking boots, from 
simple brown leather to colorful pink, green and 
blue nylon mesh, gave students a comfortable trek 
around campus or into the mountains. Many stu- 
dents preferred the comfort of worn Bucks or boots. 
For those who were not partial to the constrictions 
of footwear, Berkenstocks and Tevas supplied pro- 
tection with minimal coverage. 

Tattoos remained a popular form of body deco- 
ration, and nose-rings began to make their mark on 
students as well. 

No matter how different the students' styles, 
fads or fashions, their individuality made up the 
unique campus of JMU. 

-Tiffany Gobbi 



.Atet. 



70 



Fashion Trends 



i 





WHAT? 



"Fasliioii to me 
is tiot match- 
ing." 
-Swerinjn 

Menn/ii, 
junibr 




TATOO YOU 



BOOT LEGGERS 



Freshman Debbie 
Schebe and Senior 
Nancy Bograd 
show off their 
hoots while 
hanging out on 
the pedestrian 
plaza. Boots 
varied in 
appearance, but 
were functional as 
well as stylish. 



Junior Ben Davis 
enjoys some time 
in the sun. 
Fashion history 
repeated itself as 
the 60's long hair, 
nose ring and 
tatoo styles 
reemerged. 



HEY MON! 

^«= 

Senior Gary 
Jenkins tops off 
his outfit with a 
rasta hat. Gary 
enjoyed reggae 
music and 
worked with the 
popular band. 
Full Stop. 



Fashion Trends 



71 



CONSTRUCTION 




As chain link fences began to replace the green- 
ery along 
Ashby Hall and 



additions 
toJMU 



the Warren 
Campus Cen- 
ter this past 
summer, stu- 
dents knew it 
could mean 
only one 

thing — con- 
struction! Bull- 
dozers, dump trucks, and cranes plowed onto cam- 
pus in early May for a predicted eighteen month 
stay. This was the approximate time period neces- 
sary to construct a new residence hall and to com- 
plete additions to the Warren Campus Center. 

With the university community increasing al- 
most exponentially over the last few years, addi- 
tions to campus were inevitable. Students return- 
mg to campus for the fall semester were surprised to 
see E-lot replaced by a three story steel frame pro- 
truding from the Campus Center. 

"It's amazing how much work was done over the 
summer. . . they are really moving with this thing," 
commented senior Amy Leary. 

As additions to the WCC began, students were 
re-routed around construction, making the walk to 



upper campus seem a little longer. The Marching 
Royal Dukes also found that their practice field had 
been reduced in size. Band member Becky Sitnik 
did not seem concerned about the smaller practice 
field and she rephed, "Just as long as we can get the 
steps right on the [football] field, the conditions in 
which we practice don't seem to matter." 

Finding P.C. Dukes among all of the construction 
also created mishap for some unsuspecting stu- 
dents. "We drove on to campus hoping to go to 
Dukes only to find a fence and a mass of steel 
blocking our way," commented Seniors Sheri Watts 
and Derek Butler. "Luckily, we were able to park by 
Mister Chips and walk the rest of the way," they 
added. 

Unlike the additions to the WCC, the construc- 
tion of the new dorm on the quad did not hinder 
students in their daily activities. " The only incon- 
venience was the noise!" exclaimed one Ashby resi- 
dent. Despite the commotion of machinery, stu- 
dents still found it relaxing to nap or to frolic on the 
quad. 

Was all of the construction worth it in the stu- 
dents' eyes? It seemed for the most part that 
students agreed, while the construction was incon- 
venient, it would be ultimately be beneficial for the 
school. 

-Cindy Scott 




MEN WORKING 



LAYERS 



This sign was a 
familiar sight on 
campus. Con- 
struction of the 
new dorm began 
over the summer. 



Supports on the 

structure of the 

WWC give it a 

layered look. The 

renovations cost a 

7.1 million dollars. 




planning! 



Constructiorl 

workers paj^ 

careful attentiori 

to detail. Then 

little detailjli, 

helped conduct|li }. \ 

the enormity ot,, '\\/; 

the projects.J I '^ij 



h 



Guilfoylc 



Construction 




ADDITIONS 

-^ 

Construction 
continues on the 
addition to the 
WWC. The 
renovations 
provided more 
offices and rooms. 




^'^^^Hmnm 



Sector' 

H. Daniel O'Donneii 
f^resident 

Dr Ronald E Carrier 

General Contractor 

Nielsen Construction Co i--r 
Architects 

Wright Jones Wilkerson Rothschild Boji 










WHAT? 



"Physically, 
this is definitely 
not the same 
campus that my 
parents dropped 
me off on four 
years ago. " 
-Tommi Curd 
Senior 



DOZING 



A worker clears 
the way for the 
construction that 
lies ahead. The 
proposed dorm 
created more 
housing for the 
growing 
population of 
students. 



Cuiljuyk 



Construction 



73 



PARENTS DAY 



a visit from 
mora and dad 



VICE VERSA 



Simon Schatmeyer 

and his father 

enjoy the special 

Parents' Weekend 

dinner. Many 

famihes took 

advantage of the 

dining options at 

D-Hall. 



With the sun shining and the leaves just starting 
to change colors, it was a beautiful weekend for 
parents to travel to Harrisonburg and spend time 
with their children. For freshmen in particular, it 

was fun to 
show their par- 
ents around 
campus and in- 
troduce them 
to their college 
life. Freshman 
Shannon Price, 
whose parents 
got caught up 
in the excitement, stated, "They bought tickets for 
everything the school offered. We didn't even have 
a chance to just talk." 

The football game was a traditional favorite for 
many students and their parents. The surprise end- 
ing prevented the Dukes from repeating last year's 
victory, and although the weather was right, their 
luck wasn't. Junior Jennifer Burge commented, "We 
left early because we assumed we had it in the bag. 
I was amazed when I heard they had scored three 
touchdowns in four minutes and beat us 27-21." 

There were a variety of options to choose from. 
Students took their parents to Reddish Knob, 




Massanutten, even to Valley Mall. Freshmen Beth 
Shultz said, "Parents Weekend came just in time. I 
really needed some things so I took my parents to 
the mall and ran errands and got them to pay for 
everything. " 

Dining out also offered many alternatives. 
Harrisonburg restaurants, including Pargo's, 
Spanky's, Clayborne's, and L'ltalia, were filled both 
Friday and Saturday nights. Many students chose 
to avoid the dinner rush and stayed on campus for 
the lobster dinner at D-Hall. Sophomore Erin Myers 
stated, "Area restaurants were too crowded so we 
made dinner at the cabin my parents were in at 
Bryce." 

After dinner, the activities continued with the 
JMU Jazz band in concert at the Convocation Cen- 
ter. Junior Ben Nowak commented, "This is the 
second year my parents and I have gone. The soloist 
was great!" 

For most, October 9th and 10th was a fun-filled 
weekend. It gave students and parents a chance to 
talk, meet friends and enjoy the campus. Even for 
those whose parents weren't able to visit, it was still 
a fun weekend. Freshman Penny Pipho said, "It was 
kind of lonely because my parents were in Japan, 
but my suitemate and her parents adopted me, so I 
felt part of a family after all." 

-Laura Weiland 









74 



Parents Weekend 





WHAT? 

"Being named 

Ms. Madison 

zims the greatest 

honor. It seemed 

to Slim lip all of 

my efforts and 

achievements." 

-Erika Freihage 
senior 



NEW REIGN 



The newly 
selected Ms. 
Madison, Erika 
Freihage and Mr. 
Madison, David 
Halloway, 
congratulate each 
other. The two 
officialUy received 
their titles at the 
Parents Weekend 
football game. 



FAMILY TIES 



Magin 



Varsity cheer- 
leader Amy Elliot 
pauses to speak 
with her parents. 
The football game 
was one of the 
main events of the 
weekend. 



ROPED UP 

^ 

Theresa Gardner 
and her sisters 
prepare for a 
rappeling 
demonstration. 
The Parents' 
Weekend 
demonstration 
was presented by 
ROTC. 



DANCIN' DUKES 

Dukettes perform 

to the music of 

MRD. Thehrlf 

time show 

celebrated JMU 

1 parents. 




Parents Weekend 



75 



FAMILY TIES 

^ 

Transfer student 

Jon Smith gets a 

helping hand 

from his brother 

Steve as he moves 

into Ikenberry 

Hall. Family 

members 

alleviated some of 

the stress of the 

formidible 

freshman year. 




Miigiii 



NEWBEOINNINO 




good-bye to 



76 



On August 29, over 2,000 freshman made their 
move onto JMU's campus. For most of them, the day 
was filled with new experiences, new friends and 

unexpected 
mishaps. 

Attempting 
to pack every- 
thing they 

mom and dad r„™:?;:r, 

problem for 
many fresh- 
men. "1 never 
knew how much stuff 1 had until I tried to fit it in my 
parents' station wagon," said freshman Laura 
Garrett. "I don't think it's all going to fit in my 
room." Some found that even a station wagon was 
too small for their purposes and a great number of 
U-Hauls and Ryder vans were seen across campus. 
For some freshmen, the drive here was the worst 
part of moving. Those that made the trek from far 
away places such as Maine and New Jersey found 
that the last hours in the car with their parents were 
the worst. "1 had to listen to my parents give me 
advice all the way down here," said New York 



Freshman Move-in 



native Molly Evans. "I've never been so eager to get 
out of a car." For others, the traffic made the trip a 
difficult one. "1 couldn't believe how crowded the 
roads were," said freshman Todd Anderson. "I've 
never seen so many cars on 1-81." 

Once arriving on campus, freshmen began the 
task of unloading their minivans and U-Hauls. 
Freshmen and their parents had the assistance of 
volunteer movers from Intervarsity , Campus Catho- 
lic Ministries, and maiiy other student- run organi- 
zations. Sophomore Brett Sabin said, "1 remember 
how hard it was trying to carry all of my stuff in by 
myself, so 1 thought I'd lend a hand this year." 

Moving into the dorms was far from easy for 
anyone, but those living on the bottom floors of 
Eagle and Hillside had a definite advantage over 
those on the upper floors. Freshman Carrie Castro, 
who lived on the seventh floor of Eagle Hall, said, 
"Carrying everything I own up all those flights of 
steps was absolutely hellish." Despite the hard 
work, however, most freshmen agreed that the ex- 
citement of their first day far outweighed the trouble. 

-Kristi Shackleford 





[« 



{ ^ 




zzzzz.... 

^ 

A weary dad finds 
a spot for a well- 
deserved rest. 
Move-in day was 
a tiring experience 
for all who were 
involved. 




WHAT? 



"I never 
expected this 
day to arrive, 
and now 1 feel 
like it will never 
end! " remarked 
an eighth-floor 
Eagle resident 
after the fifth 
trip up the 
stairs. 

LEFTOVERS 



Remnants of 
move-in day litter 
this residence hall. 
Boxes and bags 
illustrated what 
freshmen deemed 
necessary for their 
living quarters. 



ESSENTIALS 



A student 
transports one of 
the more 
important pieces 
of furniture to his 
room. Refrigera- 
tors came in 
handy when one 
needed a late 
night snack. 



FOLLOW ME 



Freshmen got up 
close and personal 
with their 
classmates. The 
activities at 
Freshman Play 
Fair aided in 
breaking the ice 
among the 
newcomers. 



QUITE A VIEW 



From the eighth 
floor, parents' cars 

look like match 

boxes. With eight 

floors. Eagle Hall 

was the tallest 

building on 

campus. 




Freshman Move-in 



77 



ON THE ROAD 



These students 

make the most of 

an extended car 

trip. Students 

often traveled to 

out-of-state 

colleges to visit 

friends. 

FITTING IT IN 



Before heading 

home for the 

weekend, this 

student gets help 

from her parents 

in packing the car. 

Most students 

tried to go home 

at least twice a 

semester to spend 

time with family. 



~7 fX Road Trips 






WHAT? 

"Atlantic City 

was a great 

escape from 

JMU! We lost 

all our money, 

but it was 

worth it. " 

-Trish Marra, 

senior 



SIGN SEEKERS 



Deciding the road 
is a little dull, 
John Golinuaux, 
Matt Humke, John 
McGuiness and 
Kent Carter wave 
to passers-by. The 
guys were on 
their way to UVA. 



BYE BURO 



■ "The best way to escape from your problems is to 
!ust get away," said senior Scott Williamson. For 
)hose JMU students who agreed, road trips were the 
inswer. Whether you needed a break from your 
vorkload, roommates or school in general, road 
rips provided a needed outlet for frustrated stu- 
dents. 

Students often went on road trips to vist friends 
It other schools. "I try to go visit my best friend at 
iJniversity of Richmond," said sophomore Colleen 
Vlagin, "but I'm usually too busy with other stuff to 
^et away." Some students combined football games 
,3r other athletic events with visiting. "I went down 
; o Tech when we played in Blacksburg, then met 
iiome friends that went there to go to the game and 
tay with that weekend," said sophomore Erin 
Xoche. 

Other students used the opportunity of a free 
weekend to go visit their girlfriend or boyfriend 
-■>ack home. "I put a lot of miles on my car the first 
iwo months of school going to see my girl,"said 
lunior Greg Weaver, "but then we broke up so I 
don't have to do that any more." 

For some students, the problem was transporta- 
tion. "It's easy to get home, since you can usually 




find a ride to Northern Virginia," said freshman 
Amy Walker, "but its harder to find one to go visit 
my friends at University of North Carolina." The 
ride board offered a solution to many students' 
needs. Riders looking for an empty spot or drivers 
wanting help with gas money frequently put up 
notes. "I don't mind giving someone else a ride," 
said sophomore Heather Glauner. "I like having 
someone to talk to and I remem- 
ber when 1 didn't have a car, so I 
want to help out." 

Not all road trips had a deter- 
mined destination. Sometimes 
students would just get in the car 
and drive until their gas tank ran 
dry. Mike Everton said, "My 
friends and I would just drive 
until we found a good spot, then 
stop to hike and camp out." Out- 
door trips also included drives to Reddish Knob 
and down to Skyline Drive. 

Road trips were an important part of the college 
experience. Students took spontaneous trips to get 
away from the rigor of classes and schedules. These 
weekend get-aways were an opportunity to bond 
and form new friendships. 

-Kristi Shackelford 



hitting 
for the 



the road 
weekend 



Road Trips 



79 



SINGIN' OUT 

^ 

The Contempo- 
rary Gospel Choir 
aroused the spirit 
of parents during 
Parents' Weekend. 

Audience 

members joined in 

the singing and 

even tapped their 



SECONDS 

«^ — — 

Tim Cook helps 

himself to seconds 

at the Sunday 

Supper 

sponsoredb\ 

Catholic Campus 

Ministry. CCM 

members met at 

the house for 

Sunday Supper to 

eat and to 

socialize. 




WHAT? 



■■CCM is a 

home to inc. I'm 

proud to hold 

the title of 

Student 

Campus 

Minister. " 

-Melissa 

Poliquin, 

senior 




Campus religious groups existed in a variety of 
faiths at JMU. Baptist Student Union and Catholic 
Campus Ministry were popular organizations that 

involved a 




FAITH 



diversity among 
religious groups 



large percent- 
age of the stu- 
dent body. 
Presbyterian 
Ministry, The 
Wesley Foun- 
dation and 
B'nai B'rith 
Hillel also of- 
fered services 
and groups for students. With options to choose 
from, students were able to decide what religion to 
follow from their own experiences. 

Each of these organizations offered to students 
worship services, Bible studies, retreats, social events 
and missionary work opportunities. Baptist Stu- 
dent Union was sponsored by Southern Baptist 
churches. BSU had services for fellowship and Bible 



Study, and participated in the community of 
Harrisonburg by reaching out to children and the 
elderly. Catholic Campus Ministry was student- 
run and organized. CCM house, on Main Street, 
was the base of activities and worship services. The 
house was the center for Sunday Suppers, daily 
mass, and council meetings. The Presbyterian Min- 
istry became close-knit through an annual retreat 
and learned through weekly speakers and fellow- 
ship meetings. The Wesley Foundation was a United 
Methodist Campus Ministry that focused on faith 
and friendship through learning and service. Bible 
Studies and fellowship meetings brought the group 
together. B'nai B'rith Hillel was a national Jewish 
organization with a JMU chapter. Monthly services 
and social events engaged the group in activity as 
they learned and grew together. 

Students of any religion could find a niche at 
JMU. Intervarsity Christian Fellowship provided a 
place for different faiths to interact and worship 
together. The large variety of beliefs on campus 
allowed for comfortable practice of every religion. 

-Carrie Desmond 



Earl Perkins 

praises God while 

he sings with the 

Contemporary 

Gospel Choir. The 

Choir was one of 

the largest 

voluntary singing 

groups on 

campus. 



NO PIANO HERE 

Members of the 

Student Baptist 

Union join in song 

as a form of 

worship. BSU 

modernized their 

music program by 

adding an electric 

guitar. 



Q r^ Religious Organizations 



J 




Emily Olesch and 
Terri Dimino 
enjoy socializing 
and meeting new 
members at the 
CCM Sunday 
Supper. The 
Supper was a 
great opportunity 
to discuss faith 
with friends. 



Religious Organizations 



SCOPE SITES 



hangin' on 
the hill 



Everyone dreaded those awful midday breaks 
between classes that did not allow time to hike all 
the way home, but did not allow time for quality 
studying, either. However, students did not stress 
too much, as the patio and the hill offered an atmo- 
sphere where students could re- 
lax and socialize. 

The hill was one of the most 
popular places for students to 
hangout between classes. The hill 
drew the largest crowd during 
lunch hours. Students frequently 
stopped by the hill to meet lunch 
dates or to digest the D-Hall cui- 
sine. There was also midday en- 
tertainment sponsored by the UPB. Bands such as 
Newman Underground and After Five cirew large 
lunchtime crowds. The Hill also provided students 
with the opportunity to scope on passers-by. Sopho- 
more Jodv Koziol enjoved the Hill because, "There 
were always interesting people to watch." 

The Patio and the Commons, also known as the 
Helicopter Pad because of its circular shape, was 
also a popular place for students to hang out. Both 




locations featured venders who sold anything from 
exotic jewelrv to J. Crew clothing. The venders, who 
were sponsored by various organizations on cam- 
pus, provided the opportunity to raise funds. 

Another popular hangout was the pedestrian 
pathway in front of Carrier Libran,'. E\'en during 
the cold winter days, students could be seen jump- 
ing around, playing Hackey Sack. Many students 
relaxed or even napped either on the benches or in 
the lush grass in front of Hillcrest Hall. The Pedes- 
trian Plaza also provided students who were study- 
ing in the library with the opportimity for a breath 
of fresh air. 

As the weather turned colder, students headed 
indoors to the Airport lounge in the Campus Cen- 
ter. Students were greeted this year with new 
furniture and a television. Students were also pro- 
vided with the latest issues of popular magazines 
anci newspapers for their reading pleasure. 

While these places were great for students to 
relax and talk with friend, there did not prove to be 
very conducive to studying. Junior Paul Tine said, 
"I've missed whole days of class by just coming to 
the Hill and hanging out." 

-Beth Ann Howie 




HATS OFF 

^ 

Freshman Jay 
Boyle talks with a 

friend as they 

examine vendor's 

merchandise. The 

commons was a 

popular place to 

meet friends 
during the dav- 




U.i*ii'\<t^^%. 




WHAT? 



'T/u' /;/// /s the \ 
perfect place to \ 

hang out 
betiueen classes 

and meet 

friends to go to 

meals." 

-Chris 

O'Donnell, 

sophomore 



GIRL TALK 

Freshman Natalie 

Evans and \ 

sophomore 

Randee ^ oung 

chat on the hill 

after lunch. The 

hill was usually 

most populated 

around the noon 

hour. 

IT'S YOU! 

Grace Rob 

suggests that 

.April Childress 

tr\- on a hat as 

Kelly Cherry 

watches. The 

\endors on the 

patio offered a 

wide \'arietv of 

products, ranging 

from sweatshirts 

to jewelry to food. 



WHAT'S UP? 



Juniors Natalie 
Moore and 
Jennifer 
Kratochvil take 
time out of their 
dav to hang out 
on tlie wall on the 
pedestrian plaza. 
Many students 
enjoyed sitting 
outside of the 
library. 



82 



Patio and Commons 




Patio and Commons 



&3 



WOMEN'S 
RESOURCE CENTER 



r 



The Waxing 
Moon Gallery 





WHAT? 



"The ivomcii 's 

movement is 

campus zvidc. 

We want to 

uplift women, 

but we're not 

men-haters. We 

xvant to be every 

bit as strong 

and equal in the 

media, in the 

classroom and 

hi society. " 

-]enn Diorio, 

junior 



WAXING MOON 



The Waxing Moon 
Gallery exhibits 
artwork by and 
about women. 
The gallery was 
part of the 
women's resource, 
which promoted 
women's issues. 



MODERN ART 



Captivating 
artwork is an 
effective way for 
women to 
celebrate 
themselves. 
Newman Gallery, 
as part of the 
women's Resource 
Center, displayed 
various forms of 
artwork created 
by women. 



WHY NOT?! 



Conscientious 

actors put on a 

performance of 

"But I Said No!" 

The play 

promoted date 

rape awareness. 



O H" Speaking Out 




EQUALITY 




Across campus students spoke out for or against 
a number of issues that affected the student body. 
With the presidential elections, the political organi- 
zations were quite busy. Other organizations such 
as Harmony, the gay and lesbian rights organiza- 
tion, held awareness activities. The Animal Rights 
Coalition lobbied against the use of animals for 
product testing and dissection. Equal, the women's 
issues group, did a great deal to spread awareness. 
Women's issues quickly became the most spoken- 
for cause on campus. 

Maybe it was the introduction of a women's 
studies minor, or Logan's women's resource center, 
or Naomi Wolf speaking to a packed house about 
"the Beauty Myth"... however it started, JMU was 
not immune to the impact of the women's move- 
ment. What the media called "the year of the woman" 
quickly translated into discussion groups, speak- 
ers, and a radio show dealing with traditionally 
feminist issues. 

Speakers and special programs were also instru- 
mental in increasing awareness. Katie Koestner, a 
former William and Mary student, spoke after the 
annual "Take Back the Night" rally about her expe- 
rience of being date-raped. Former beauty queen 



Ann Simonton spoke about sexist images of women 
in the media. During alcohol awareness week, a 
play called "But 1 Said No" also dealt with acquain- 
tance rape. 

Academic 
coverage of the 
issue included • • • • 

women s his VOlCmg 0011110118 

tory and litera- C? JL 

ture classes. 1 , -i • 

Some depart aOOUt Teal ISSUBS 

ments faced 
challenges 
within their 

curriculum. The art department had to address a 
petition stating that not enough women artists were 
covered in art history classes. Many professors be- 
gan incorporating women's issues into their syllabi. 
Other areas of campus life were affected by the 
women's movement as well. A new women's art 
gallery was opened and a weekly radio show on 
WXJM focused on women's issues. Arts and com- 
munications spread the issues directly to the stu- 
dent body to inform both males and females. 

-Deana Hoisington 



DRESSED UP 

^ 

Joe Smith 

expresses his 

social and 

political views by 

wearing dresses. 

Several students 

spoke out for 
womens' issues. 








DISSECTION 

-^ 

The Animal 
Rights Coalition 
protests on the 
Commons against 
the use of animals 
for science. They 
were opposed to 
animal testing. 



Speaking Out O p: 





""" Virginia 93 

JMU-JEFF 

f<S» DUKES • -s 




WHAT? 



"/ think we've 

elected the 

wrong guy, but 

if we all support 

him, we 'II be all 

right. " 

-Scott 

Willianisou 

senior 



LIBERALS 

^"^ 

These students 
take a stand of 
support during a 
pro-choice rally. 
This exhibition, 
which was 
sponsored by the 
Young Democrats, 
gave individuals 
the opportunity to 
voice their 
opinions. 



JEFF & BUSH 



This student 
displays his 
support for Bush. 
Despite a valiant 
effort, the Bush- 
Quayle duo fell 
prey to the all- 
powerRil surge of 
the Democratic 
Party in the 1992 
election. 

SPEAKING OUT 



During an 

interview at the 
Clinton/Gore 
rally in Rich- 
mond, JMU 
alumnus Pat 
Southall discusses 
her support for 
Clinton. Students 
and alumni 
actively promoted 
their favorite 
candidate. 



Q Presidential Election 




ELECTIONS 



In the midst of the greatest recession since the 
Great Depression, the election of Bill Clinton and 
running mate Al Gore marked a new future for the 
country. For the first time in twelve years, a Demo- 
crat was elected Chief of the Executive power, a 
factor which many hoped would end the deadlock 
created by conflicting views of former Republican 
Presidents and the predominately Democratic Con- 
gress. 

Clinton battled with his rivals, incumbant George 
Bush and Independent H. Ross Perot. Perot, who 
had dropped out of the race in July, rejoined the 
campaign in October. Perot pressed the issues of the 
runaway national debt and the country's economic 
problems to become the most prominent Indepen- 
dent to ever run for the presidency, taking nearly 
20% of the popular vote. 

The main issues of the campaign surfaced in the 
debates held in the waning weeks of the election. 
The candidates shared their views on the economy 
and character, two focal issues of the election. Clinton 
and Perot pushed the economic issues while Bush 
concentrated on the character of the candidates. 

The debates themselves were historical. The 
Vice-Presidential debate offered a new "open" for- 
mat, as the candidates. Gore, former Vice-President 
Dan Quayle, and Perot's running mate Admiral 




Clinton-Gore 



Stockdale, were given various subjects and unre- 
stricted time to debate each. 

Student reaction to the campaign was mainly 
that of dismay. Many students felt that too much 
attention was given to the issues of character and 
family values and 
not enough to the 
economy and na- 
tional debt. Ac- 
cording to sopho- 
more Christine 

"i'aVe';;";^.™; win student votej 

but the candi- 
dates' view- 
points on the 
matter were not a deciding factor in how I voted." 

Prior to the election, the SGA sponsored a stu- 
dent debate, and several political analysts were 
invited on campus to give students the opportunity 
to make an informed decision. 

All in all, most students felt comfortable with 
Clinton's election. As CUnton stated in his accep- 
tance speech, "You have claimed what was right- 
fully yours-a leader that will work with the young, 
the old, and the poor." 

-Cindy Scott and Rob Singer 





UNITED FRONT 

.^E 

At the University 
of Richmond, 
Doug Wilder and 
Bill Clinton raise 
their joined 
hands. The 
second presiden- 
tial debate was 
held at U of R. 



DEMOCRATS 



These democratic 
students display 
their support for 
Clinton and Gore. 
Clinton won the 

election with 

forty-two percent 

of the popular 

vote. 



Presidential Election o / 



'Si 



!i iiitrt'" 




Intramural 

volleyba 

teammates take 

time to pose for a 

picture. Teams 

bonded in 

friendly 

competition. 



Intramurals 




WHAT? 

i "Competing in 

intramurals is 

an opportunity 

for brothers to 

have fun and 

(spend time 
together. " 
i-fohn McHugh , 
I P; Sigma 
I Epsilon 

I 



IVEGOTIT! 

i Senior Jimmy 

' Wilson returns the 

) ball to his 

! opponent as his 

ping pong partner 
; Robert Im 

concentrates on 
V his next move. 

Ping pong 

intramural 

championships 

added an 

interesting 

alternative to 

typical sports. 

PRIDE 

Senior Ryan Chan, 
an intramural 
coordinator, 
watches the ping 
pong with 
satisfaction. 
Organizing 
intramural events 
involved a great 
deal of planning 
and coordination 
with other events. 



NUMBER ONE! 

The much 
coveted Intramu- 
ral champion 
shirt is displayed 
in Godwin Hall. 
Although many 
played just 
because they 
enjoyed sports, 
winning made 
the experience 
even more fun. 



INTRAMURALS 




Although most students were not involved in 
varsity sports, they still had a wide range of oppor- 
tunities to participate in intramural sports and sports 
clubs. These activities offered students fun and 
competition without the long term commitment of 
a varsity team. 

The JMU Intramural program was a well struc- 
tured organization run by the recreation adminis- 
tration and students together. Christine Michal was 
the Intramural coordinator and was assisted by 
fourteen student aides. Student referees were in 
charge of officiating the games. 

Some activities offered by the intramural pro- 
gram included softball, volleyball, tennis, raccjuet- 
ball, soccer, basketball, and swimming. 

Students participated in the program in either 
the championship division or the independent divi- 
sion. To compete with the championship teams, 
players had be affiliated with an organization such 
as a fraternity or a dorm. Students who formed 
teams with a group of friends competed in the 
independent division. Organizations in the cham- 
pionship division were scored for their participa- 
tion in events throughout the year. Points were 
received for their performance. The men's and 
women's organization with the greatest number of 



points were division champions for the year. Zeta 
Tau Alpha and Chi Phi were the champs for the 91- 
92 school year. 

The intramural program offered the opportunity 
to all JMU stu- 



a little healthy 
Gompetition 



dents to be- 
come involved. 
There were 
both A and B 
skill divisions. 
"We had 

people playing 
with many dif- 
ferent levels of 
skill" said Christine Michal, program coordinator. 

Sports clubs also offered athletic participation 
with varied skill levels. Popular team clubs were 
men's and women's Rugby, Lacrosse, Martial Arts, 
Field Hockey, and Waterpolo. Many of the students 
who were involved with these teams were begin- 
ners. 

Students enjoyed being a part of these clubs 
because they were able to play rival teams but were 
not required to have the long-term commitments of 
a varsity team. 

-Beth Anne Howie 




PREPARED 



Two members of 
an intramural 
volleyball team 
jump as their 
opponent hits the 
ball over the net. 
Although the 
teams were 
competitive, most 
students played to 
have fun and meet 
friends. 



Intramurals 



89 



ROYALTY 



When the football team cleared the field at half- 
time of each game, the Marching Royal Dukes took 
over. The band dazzled crowds with energetic 
music and intricate drills. Their high quality perfor- 

manccs were 




marching dukes 
awe crowds 



achieved 
through hard 
work and a 
great deal of 
dedication. 
Along with the 
hard work 



commented junior Chip Clark. 

The MRD performed a new show for each game. 
Musical selections ranged from classical to crowd 
favorites. "Proud Mary," "Can't Help Falling in 
Lo\T," and the "William Tell Overture" were crowd 
pieaser^ performed Oy the band this \ 

A highlight of the season was a ha 
mance at the Washington Redskins-Falcons gai 
RFK Stadium. "It was an incn-diln ^ . j, m, n, , (qj 
perform for a crowd of 55,000/' said senior Uoug 
Rose. Other road trips included the season kickof f 
?ame at Virginia Tech and the Univer^iK v\ Ki li 




WHAT? 



f?m<»l 



and personal 
satisfaction. 

Students marching in the band felt a great deal of 
pride when performing. "It was a great feeling to 
hear the crowd's response after a performance," 



over fall break. It was a competition for high schools 
in an effort to attract prospective members. All in 
all, the MRD had an extremely successful season 
and truly were "Virginia's Finest." 

-Beth Ann Howie 




TOOT TOOT 



Brandy and Chris 
Burrow play the 
fight song as the 

band finishes 
another spectacu- 
lar performance. 

To excite the 

crowd for another 

half of football, 

the band ended 

each performance 

with the fight 

song. 




post-game 

sbozo. " 

-Man O'Brien, 

junior 



SPIRIT ZONE 



Sitting in the 
bleachers at the 
end of the field, 
the band members 
lead the rest of the 
student body in 
cheers. The band 
played hits such 
as "Bad to the 
Bone" to motivate 
the team. 



FLYING FLAGS 



Showing poise 
and grace, 
members of the 
guard Heather 
Glauner and Katie 
Wetham perform. 
The guard added 
a visual dimen- 
sion to the half 
time show. 



Ma^^i'i 



0(3 Marching Royal Dukes 




Mi!\'ni 












HHPMfH 


mH 


1 


P^^n 


^^ 


1 


/i\ 




yOM^^I^ 


^ 


.. — ■ 









STICK IT OUT 

^ 

Keeping the rest 

of the band in 

time, Lillian 

Gregorio beats out 

the rhythm of the 
music on the 

quints. The MRD 
relied on the 

drum line to keep 
them in step. 



MARCHING ON 



Magtn 



Drum major Sean 
Gray leads the 
MRD onto the 
field for their half- 
time performance. 
The Dukes 
entertained the 
crowds at all 
home games and 
a few away 
games. 



Marching Royal Dukes O ^ 



HUMBLE ABODE 



After their freshman year many students sought 
alternatives to University housing. Most chose to 
hve in one of the many off-campus apartment facili- 
ties. However, there were those who chose to live in 

the older 
houses near 




house with 
personaHties 



campus that 
had personali- 
ties all their 
own. 

If you 
took a walk 
from the quad 
down South 
Main Street, you encountered several student occu- 
pied houses clustered near the 7-Eleven. The large 
yellow two story was known as the Slaughter House- 
-a name which made one wonder what occurred 
there. Although the name had negative connota- 
tions, such was not the case. 

According to two of the seven current residents, 
Anissa Callowhill and Jennifer Ludovice, the house 
got its name about seven years ago. For ten years, 
the house had been occupied by sisters of ZTA. In a 
competitive intramural volleyball game, Zeta badly 
defeated Alpha Sigma Alpha, and put a sign in their 
yard saying, "ZTA slaughtered ASA." 

The following weekend, their neighbors went on 
a road trip and brought a present back for them. The 
Green House guys saw a sign which read "Wood's 
Slaughter House." Knowing that their neighbors' 
house was owned by Dr. John Wood, a history 
professor at JMU, and recalling that they had re- 
cently slaughtered their opponent in volleyball, 
they took the sign for their neighbors. Ever since, the 
sign has been above the fireplace in the living room. 



Right across the street from the Slaughter House, 
was the White House. There was no mystery to its 
name, since the two-story stucco was indeed white. 
According to current resident Ellen Mayo, it had 
that name for as long as she or anyone else can 
remember. 

The large house was approximately 80 years old 
and housed mostly sisters of Tri Sigma for the past 
five years. The house has a very unusual layout 
which caused confusion for the seven female stu- 
dents now living there. After asking some ques- 
tions, they discovered that the White House had 
served as a boy's home until the 1950s or early 60s. 

Another off-campus house, which was not very 
far off campus at all, was the Graffiti House. In 
recent years, there had been some confusion as to 
which of the houses on the hill by Wine Price was 
the actual Graffiti House. The house right next to 
Wine Price was once referred to as the Rugby House. 
However, through some consensus, it had laid claim 
to the Graffiti title. 

The House got its name from the painted wall 
along Cantrell Avenue. At one time the wall was 
covered with graffiti until someone eventually 
painted a mural over it. The currents of the house 
supposed the wall was originally built as a sound 
barrier to block the noisy traffic from Cantrell. 

The House and its occupants were notorious for 
their extremely large parties on the hill. Reportedly 
, it was not uncommon for the women of Wine Price 
to be awakened late at night by the singing of the 
Graffiti House guys. The singers voluntary con- 
fessed that on rare occasions, they were not only 
serenading Wine Price, but did so in the buff. 

-Rebecca Haile 



92 



CANNONBALL 

The Graffitti 

House, a popular 

party site for 

students, sits on 

the hill by Wine 

Price. The 

neighboring wall, 

once covered in 

graffitti, gave the 

house its name. 



Off Campus Houses 




^^'r^ 






The skateboard 
ramp behind the 
Green House 
provides hours of 
high speed fun for 
its residents. 
Residents of the 
Slaughter House, 
located next door, 
opted to watch 
and not partici- 
pate in the antics. 



WHAT? 



"I enjoy living 
in the Ginger- 
bread House. It 
has a great look 

and is a 
convenient five 

minute walk 

from campus. " 

-MaryLynne 

Bucaro, 

senior 



PORCH PALS 



Dave Duncan, 
Mary Lynne 
Bucaro and Gabby 
Soncini enjoy 
hanging out on 
the front porch of 
the Gingerbread 
House. The house 
looks like it 
jumped from the 
pages of the fairy 
tale Hansel and 
Gretel. 



SWAN, SWAN 



An unusual 
ornament on the 
mailbox of the 
Green House nails 
the mailman and 
catches the 
attention of 
passers-by. The 
origin of the 
house's name was 
no mystery once 
people saw its 
bold paint job. 



Off Campus Houses 



93 




The Arts 




WHAT? 

"Wlieii you 

discover whai 

!i/i'// 're good at, 

I i/oii go for it. 

Some criticize 

me for being a 

music major 

because it 's not 

practical, but I 

think it 's more 

practical to do 

soujething you 

love. " 

-Michael 

Connely, 

senior 



DRAMA 

Vlarnie Penning 
md Darren 
letlow execute 
mother outstand- 
jng performance 
jfMacBeth. The 
ihenandoah 
Shakespeare 
Express gave 
nodern interpre- 
tations to the 
classic plays. 

SWEET MELODY 

Concentration is a 

must for Sheri 

Ellis when 

performing. The 

Wind Symphony 

gave students 

opportunities to 

expand their 

talents. 



SPLENDOR 

Members of the 
Contemporary 
Dance Ensemble 
[present "Real Life 
|of Swans." The 
Dance Ensemble 
gave several 
breathtaking 
performances. 



PERFORMANCE 




This past year Harrisonburg was anything hut 
lacking cultural experiences. Between theater per- 
formances, dance companies and different art ex- 
hibits, the options were plentiful. Students discov- 
ered the talents of the students and faculty around 
them while visiting theJMU art galleries. TheSawhill 
Gallery, in Duke Hall, housed different traveling 
exhibits, including national shows. Each semester 
the gallery also presented a show of the best works 
from faculty and students. The Zirkle House on 
South Main Street was a student run gallery featur- 
ing students' art works. Another gallery. The New 
Image Gallery, was also located in the Zirkle House. 
A new exhibit was presented every other week in 
each gallery. During the opening of each show, one 
could talk to the artist or munch on the food pro- 
vided. 

During fall semester, kegs were placed around 
campus to advertise for the play "Defeat Party" . The 
play realistically portrayed high school. The other 
main theaters on campus were the JMU Theater and 
Theater II. Another intriguing performance was by 
the Shenandoah Shakespeare Express which took 
place in Duke. They performed at JMU once or twice 
a year and put on two or three shows each time. The 
modern day Shakespeare plays involved minimal 
props and often interacted with the audience. 

The diversity alone of the dance programs on 
campus was enough to interest anyone. In the Asso- 
ciate Group Ensemble, auditions were open to all 



students. Along with receiving a grade and credits, 
a member performed in the showcase concerts or 
other studio concerts. Dance majors and minors, 
along with dedicated students, made up the Con- 
temporary 
Dance En- 



giving life to the 
performing arts 



semble. The 
members of 
this company 
also received 
grades and 
credits. The 
company pro- 
vided the op- 
portunity for 

members to choreograph and perform in showcases 
and concerts. The third company on campus was 
the Virginia Repertory Dance Company, which was 
comprised of dance faculty, dance majors, and 
graduates. The members auditioned for and per- 
formed one main stage concert each year. It also 
toured and performed throughout Virginia. "Th- 
ompson and Trammell" were two JMU faculty 
members who worked together and alone in their 
interpretation of abstract modern dance. Last spring, 
JMU had the honor of hosting the Mid-Atlantic 
Region of the American College Dance Festival 
Association. This national company was niade up 
of college dancers that toured each region. 

-Laura Weber 



HARMONIES 



Members of the 

JMU Chorale 

perform during 

Parents' Weekend. 

The group 

showed their 

diversity of talent 

by performing 

hits of all music 

interests. 




The Arts 



DINNER TIME 

Sigma Signiii 

Sigma sorority 

sisters enjoy a 

leisure dinner. 

Students enjoyed 

hanging out and 

relaxing during 

their summer 

break. 





HANCIN OUT 



One of the aspects of JMU which made it so 

memorable 
was the time 




rest, relaxation, 
recuperation 



spent hanging- 
out with 

friends. Stu- 
dents certainly 
did not want to 
devote all of 
their spare time 
to their studies. 
Most preferred 
some quality time shared with friends to ease the 
stress of exams, research papers and group projects. 
Catching a favorite TV show while stretched out 
on a sofa was always a popular way for students to 
hang-out. Soap operas were means for ritual gather- 
ings amongst many groups of friends. Beverly Hills 
90210 kept a majority of the female population 
occupied on Wednesday nights. Sporting events 
such as the World Series, Monday Night Football 
and the Super Bowl were also favorite programs 
that students joined together to watch. 

The Go-Cart Raceway and the Bullpen were places 



friends went to hang-out around the Burg. Stu- 
dents could take out some frustrations on the race- 
track or in the batting cages. They could also engage 
in a little bit of healthy competition on the miniature 
golf course. 

For those without energy to release, a great way 
to hang out was by chilling on the quad on a nice day 
or killing time on the hill. Breaks between classes 
and meal times gave students an opportunity to 
relax, unwind and spend some time talking to friends 
or just admire the beauty of campus. 

Getting back to nature was one of the best ways 
to hang out for many. The solitude and peaceful 
atmospheres of places such as Reddish Knob, Sky- 
line Drive and the many parks around the area 
provided friends with some quality time. Friends 
hanging out in these places pondered the meaning 
of life and gazed at the breath-taking views of the 
Shenandoah Valley. 

Regardless of the places students went or the 
things they did, being with friends was the most 
important factor. After all, it was not where you 
hung out but the relationships formed with those 
you hung out with. -Beth Ann Howie 



MUNCHIES 

Heather and 
Derek 

Carbonneau and 
Kathv Alcorn 
relax and munch 
on cookies. 
Students enjoyed 
spending quiet 
evenings at home 
as well as going 
out. 



DECISIONS 

JMU professor 

Steve Schwab 

examines a 

brochure after a 

hearty lunch at 

Luigi's. Luigi's 

was known for its 

calzone and pizza 



WHAT? 

"It 's not the 

place that's 

important — 

spending time 

ivith your 
friends is what 
really matters." 
-Jenny Fore- 
hand, 
sophomore 



HIGH ALTITUDE 

Matt Humke and 

his friends enjoy 

the mountain 

view. One of the 

advantages ot 

going to school in 

Harrisonburg was 

its close proximity 

to Skyline Drive 

and the Blue 

Ridge mountains 



(p^ Hanging Out 




Hanging Out 



LOUD & CLEAR 



The bassist for 

After Five, a 

student jazz band, 

entertains a 

crowd. After 5 

was one of several 

bands that played 

on the Commons 

during warmer 

weather. 




Mti\;iti 



AFTER HOURS 



Providing the student body at JMU with a variety 
of quality entertainment throughout the entire school 
year was quite a demanding job. Keeping students 
entertained was the main goal of the University 
Program, and its members had their hands full in 
reaching it! According to executive chair Serena 
Ricci, the UPB kept in mind the great diversity on 
campus when scheduling events. With taking this 
approach, the UPB ensured that there was always 
something for everyone. 

Music 
lovers enjoyed a 
year of enter- 
tainment as sev- 
eral of the UPB's 
major events 
were musical 
acts. Students 
were welcomed 
back to JMU by 
the sounds of the band Ocean Blue in the Godwin 
gym. Later in the semester, students had the chance 
to mellow out at the Convocation Center with singer 
James Taylor. 

Taylor brought the enthusiastic crowd to its feet 
with his heart warming songs and dances. 

Those with a good sense of humor got a big kick 




UPB entertains, 
enlivens JMU 



out of comedians like Rita Rudner who graced the 
stage of Wilson Hall. Hypnotist Tom DeLuca, a 
repeat performer and favorite at JMU, had his vol- 
unteers in trances and his audience in stitches at his 
standing-room-only show. Through the UPB, JMU 
also welcomed such big names as MTV personality 
Dennis Leary and sex therapist Dr. Ruth to its 
campus. 

As usual, fans of the silver screen could easily 
satisfy their movie mania at Grafton-Stovall theater. 
Students were pleased to find recent popular re- 
leases playing on campus, and even more pleased to 
see the low cost of tickets! 

This year, UPB members looked forward to Spring 
Break as much as the rest of the student body. The 
UPB traditionally sponsored a spring break trip 
available to all students. This year's expedition was 
to the tropical island of Jamaica. 

Ricci and the executive council were proud of the 
advances the UPB had made in terms of its image. 
Aside from a few faculty advisors, the organization 
is basically student-run with eleven full time stu- 
dents on the executive council and over four hun- 
dred student members. According to students' stan- 
dards, the UPB definitely reached their goal of 
providing the students with a variety of quality 
entertainment. 

— Rebecca Haile 



Wqj University Program Board 



HUMOR ME 

Rita Rudner 
entertains in 
Wilson Hall with 
her subtle humor. I 
Riid ner was 
booked by the ■ 
UPBasthefeaturf 
performer for 
1 lomecoming 
Weekend. 



SWEET JAMES 



Musician James 

Taylor plays 
before a sold out 
crowd at the 
Convo. Taylor 
attracted a diverse 
crowd, from 
students to grand- 
parents. 




WHAT? 



■'UPB has 
definitely come 
a long way as 
far as entertain- 
ment goes. " 
-Serena Ricci, 
executive chair 
UPB 



TICKLISH? 

A trusting fan at 

the Ocean Blue 

concert takes the 

Nestea plunge 

into a sea of 

hands. The 

concert kicked off 

the new semester. 



KEYED UP 




Cciitofaiiti 



University Program Board ^Q 



P I C RO A$T 



The day was as close to paradise as one could 
wish for in the 'Burg — the sky was a deep sea of blue 

and a light 
breeze warmlv 




seniors say bye 
with a smile 



greeted the 
awakening 
day. It was 
Spring Semes- 
ter Reading 
Day. . .and Se- 
nior Pig Roast. 
While un- 
derclassmen 
utilized Reading Day to study, sleep or just relax, 
seniors had another idea in mind — ending their 
college career with a bang. The tradition of the 
Senior Pig Roast was long standing. A day filled 
with partying, beer, friends and music character- 
ized the event, as did a couple of pigs roasted over 
an open fire. "The entire day was a blast," com- 
mented soon-to-be alumnus Lisa Omahundro. "It 



was an event that I had been looking forward to all 
year." 

Sponsored by the junior class, the event was held 
on Godwin Field and was open for all seniors and 
anyone else with a student ID and a few bucks. 
Those who were twenty-one were able to roam 
freely about the field where a Coors beer truck was 
tapped and ready to serve. Those who were not 
fortunate enough to have celebrated their legality 
were confined to a fenced off area where food, but 
no alcohol was being served. "Even though I was a 
junior, I went to the Pig Roast. . . a lot of my friends 
were graduating and since I was twenty-one, I 
decided I would party with them one last time," 
commented junior Alison Harris. 

Entertainment was provided by local bands such 
as Full Stop and Uncle Charlie. A little hesitant at 
first, students soon rushed the stage and danced for 
the last time on Godwin field as bonafide JMU 
students. The event was a great success and fun was 
had by all. 

-Cindy Scott 



§%:'M[ 




TAKE A BREAK 



Two seniors chat 

on the grass after 

standing in the 

beer line. Godwin 

Field provided a 

comfortable 

environment for 

the event. 



^ /^/^ Senior Pig Roast 





WHAT? 

"The Pig Roast 
'was a great end 
to a great four 

years. " 

-Joiiu Ahlfeld, 

aliiDiiiiis 



ANXIOUS GALS 

^ 

A group of girls 
wait to be served 
beer. The Pig 
Roast was one of 
the last opportuni- 
ties seniors had to 
spend with their 
friends before 
graduation. 

MAKING EYES 

^ 

Brian Zarchin 
winks at the 
camera as he 
waits for a friend 
to get some beer. 
Even pets were 
allowed to enjoy 
the festivities. 



LENGTHY LINE 



Junior class 

president 

Catherine 

Sheehan serves a 

line of thirsty beer 

drinkers. The 

junior class 

sponsored the 

event. 




Senior Pig Roast -1 O ^ 



$HOOT YOURSELF 




For those students who were anxious 
for a moment in the limelight, the Blue- |i 
stone provided the perfect opportunity ~ 
''Shoot Yourself -- with a camera, of 
CO urse. Th e long s tan ding tra di tion of 
''Shoot Yourself enabled students to 
brush up on their photography skills while 
having a lot of fun! 






The idea behind ''Shoot Yourself was to 
involve the student body in the creation of 
The Bluestone by allowing students to ful- 
fill the role of photographer. This special 
feature enabled everyone to become per- 
sonally involved. Students submitted pho- 
tographs of friends and props that were 
crazy, wild and innovative. The following 
pages are the outcome of such joviality. 
Take a look. . . 



102 Shoot Yourself 



XyfjEM couples 




Shoot Yourself i 03 



soccer i$ the glue that 
keeps us together 




-^ ^ Shoot Yourself 




Shoot Yourself ^ 05 



in good 



<zo 



mpc\ny 




106 



Shoot Yourself 




Shoot Yourself 




108 



Shoot Yourself 




bosom 
buddies 



Shoot Yourself 



109 




VUKBS 
PC'W(£R 





|r 




LOW BLOW. PJ Caggiano drives through a 
Northeastern defender. The Dukes' offense 
consistently scored over 40 points per game. 

SHEER FORCE! LeeAnne Marinaccio drives the 

ball from deep in JMU territory. The women's 

soccer team was nationally ranked throughout 

the season. 

SPORTS eVJTO-R: 

50MA) -Roa^-RS 

ASST. SPORTS BVOTOK: 
ShlANNO]^ BAJLBy 




I M PACT 




Sweat and blood; performance, excellence, 
achievement and showmanship; dedication, 
frustration, perseverance in purple and gold. To 
compete, surmount, finish and win- these were 
the aspects of the athletes of James Madison. 

On the omni-turf at Bridgeforth Stadium, at 
Long Field, in Godwin, on the Convo floor, in a 
dozen fields and tracks here and around the 
United States, people were introduced to the 
impressive force and sportsmanship of JMU 
competitors. 

In training, practice and games, the Dukes 
proved again and again that commitment pays 
off. Each season was a showcase for another 
group of teams that were worthy of the 
university's pride in victory and loss. The ath- 
letes made friends and memories during their 
days in uniform and were a prominent part of 
college life for all of the students. 

This section is dedicated to those who have 
worn the purple and gold, who have given to 
the university in a way that cannot fully be 
repaid. Hopefully it is worthy of the effort they 
have made. 



RESISTANT 



Sports Divider ^ "^ ^ 



ON THE MOVE*Rosheen Campbell 
races down the field looking for an 
open teammate. Teamwork helped 
the Dukes outscore their opponents 
by a total of 22 goals in all second 
periods. 




JMU 
4 



Yale 

Princeton 

Colgate 

Penn State 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Richmond 

Old Dominion 

Loyola, MD 

William and Mary 

Georgetown 

American 

Virginia 

American 

William and Mary 

Old Dominion 

Towson State 

HIGHLIGHTS 



• The Dukes finished the season 
ranked 13th in the nation, 
playing eight games against 
other ranked teams; they lost 
three of those games by only 
two goals in each 
game and beat 
Towson State 9-6 on 
April 23. 



GO HARDiCoach 
McDonough goes 
over her strategy 
with the team during 
their pregame talk. 
The Dukes outscored 
their opponents in 
the Colonial Athletic 
Association 52-25 in 
five games. 



Lacrosse 



u ot Si 



Front Row; Carolyn Carr, Nora Maguire, Michelle Bianco, Katherine Robinson, Danyle 
Heffernan, Troyhann Stantos, Megan Boyle. Second Row: Gretchen Zimmerman, Laura 
Whelan, Alisa Lupo, Karlene Lydic, Rosheen Campbell, Diane Hallowell, Ruth Moran, 
Nicole Habay, Kathryn Mangao, Maureen Lacy, Lara Juenger. Not Pictured: Kelly Moran 
Sus^n Rrinkw.^rth Krista Siilg 



"1^2 ^P""8 Sports 





J} 



LACROSSE FACED TOUGH 
COMPETITION WITH STYLE 




♦ The JMU Lacrosse team 
fought through adversity dur- 
ing the 1992 spring campaign, 
going 9-8, up from a 7-7 record 
posted in 1991. The Dukes 
placed third in the C A A Cham- 
pionships, and finished the 
season ranked 13th in the na- 
tion. Individually, the Dukes 
set eight school records, and 
Coach Dee McDonough got her 
100th career win. 

McDonough's 100th win 
came on a 19-3 blowout at 
American University. She said, 
"It's great to have it! What's 
even better, though, is the kids. 
They make it worthwhile." 

The Dukes 9-8 final record 
was not a complete measure of 
the team's success. They fin- 
ished with a ranking of thir- 
teenth in the nation while play- 
ing over 40% of their games 
against other nationally 
ranked teams, including sec- 
ond ranked Maryland, the 
eventual national champion. 
They went 8-1 against 
unranked competition, losing 
only to Delaware on a fateful 
road trip. 



Captain Nora Maguire said, 
"[the Delaware game] was 
pretty upsetting. The weather 
was bad on the first trip up and 
the game was cancelled, so we 
had to travel a second time and 
both Diane 

Hollowell and 
Troyhann Santos 
were sick. What's 
more we had just 
heard that we had 
moved up to fourth 
in the national 
standings. All of 
that threw us for a 
spin and we didn't 
play well." 

About Maguire, 
who set seven school records 
in 1992, McDonough said, 
"Nora was outstanding for us 
all four years. She was the only 
player we ever had who made 
the U.S. National squad all four 
years she played." Maguire 
said, "I would have been hap- 
pier to have had a worse year 
and a better team year. But I 
have to be happy with my year, 
leading the nation in scoring 
...(was) really satisfying." 



"Nora was 

outstanding.... She 

was the only 

player we ever 

had who made 

the U.S. squad 

all four years she 



play£d." 



After losing against eighth 
ranked William and Mary in 
the CAA Tournament, the la- 
crosse team won their first 
game against a ranked team, 
beating Towson State, 9-6. 
Unfortunately, the 
late season success 
was not enough to 
attract an NCAA 
play-off bid. 

McDonough 
concluded that, 
"We all thought 
we'd have a better 
season. Wedidplay 
well against some 
strong teams. We 
never seemed to be 
able to get in a good start." She 
added that, "there were like 
eight games we could have 
won if we hadn't played the 
first ten minutes like we did." 
Nonetheless, the Dukes posted 
a winning season, achieved the 
rank of 13th in the nation, and 
set plenty of individual 
records. They played strong 
and finished with a flourish. 
-Vasha Hunt 




.v» 



EXPERIENCE* Senior Nora 
Maguire keeps her eye on the ball in 
anticipation of another chance to 
score. In four years, she scored 138 
goals and made 61 assists. 



EVASIVE* Concentrating all the 

way, Michelle Bianco flips a pass to 

her teammate. The team had 67 

assists in 1992. 



INTENSITY* Focusing on keeping 

possesion of the ball, Troyhann 

Santos outmaneuvers her opponent 

and attempts to score. She was 

successful enough to score 13 times. 



Lacrosse 



113 





DIAMOND DUKES FINISHED ABOVE 
.500 IN SEASON OF ADVERSITY 




ADVANCING ♦ Brian Morabito trots from second 
to third base after a walk with men on first and 
second. The Dukes posted an on-base percentage of 
.377 on the season. 



♦ The James Madison baseball 
team ended their season with a 
winning record, but their 26- 
24 finish was a disappointment 
to many of the players. After 
beginning their season with 
what was considered one of 
the strongest freshman classes 
ever, a mixture of injuries, 
tough competition and incon- 
sistent play prevented the team 
from realizing their full poten- 
tial. 

The Dukes started the sea- 
son emphasizing pitching, a 
long standing forte of the JMU 
program. However, the team 
suffered the early loss of fresh- 
man pitcher Cory Rafner to a 
knee injury. One of the Dukes' 
brightest hopes, Rafner was 
unable to finish the season fol- 
lowing his injury. This injury 
seemed to foreshadow similar 
problems that plagued the 
Dukes throughout the year. 

Another obstacle to the 
Dukes' success was the high 
level of competition they were 
forced to contend with. Teams 
within the CAA gave JMU a 
great deal of competition and 



head coach Ray Heatwole felt 
there were many notable teams 
within the division, 
citing clubs such as 
George Mason and 
East Carolina as 
powerhouses. 

Although ECU 
was a perennial 
power and gave the 
Dukes a hard run, 
JMU went 4-0 
against the Pirates. 
Senior Rob 

Mummau felt the 
wins were a high 
point in the JMU season, claim- 
ing "We went 4-0 against them, 
while we're usually 0-4. We 
played our best baseball 
against them." The Dukes 
hoped to maintain their mo- 
mentum, when they next faced 
Virginia Commonwealth, an- 
other tough rival who came 
one win short of the College 
World Series in post-season 
play. A win over VCU would 
have greatly improved the 
Dukes' outlook, but they fell to 
the Rams, 7-10. The season was 
becoming characterized by in- 



" We didn't play 

consistently at 

all— it was a 

roller coaster 

season. A team 

has to have that 

consistency to 

win. " 
♦ 



consistent play, and the Dukes 

often pulled off a win against 

stiff competition 

only to lose to a less 

talented team. 
Mummau noted 
that the team, 
"didn't play consis- 
tently at all— it was 
a roller coaster sea- 
son. A team has to 
have that consis- 
tency to win." 

The Dukes' 
inconsistency was 
apparent in their 
performance against The 
Citadel. In their first meeting, 
the Dukes lost by a score of 
15-0. On the following day, 
though, the Dukes bounced 
back for a 5-2 win. The team 
performed in spurts through- 
out the season, such as when 
they lost three games to Rich- 
mond, who finished second in 
the CAA, and then beat VMl 
and went on a three game rout 
of ECU. 

ONLOOKERS ♦ Trainer Jill Koenig 
watches the Dukes bat as the players 
look on with varying degrees of 
interest. 





CLEAN-UP DUTY ♦ The 
turf at Long field gets 
swept clean of Sun- 
flower seeds as the 
bench watches the game. 



THROW DOWN ♦ First baseman 
Kevin Nehring picks off a GMU 
baserunner trying to return to the 
bag. On the season, JMU stole 51 
more bases than their opponents. 






^ ^ ^ Spring Sports 




HERE'S THE PITCH ♦ Rick 
Croushore winds up and fires a 
ball to a Richmond opponent. 
Croushore finished the year with 
a 3.07 earned run average. 

SAFE ♦ During a game against 
George Mason, Rob Mummau 
slides into second base. The 
Dukes went 2-1 against Mason 
this year. 



Baseball ^ ^ 3 



CELEBRATION ♦ During a chilly 
March game, the Dukes leave the 
dugout to welcome home Jeff 
Kaufman who scored the go-ahead 
run. 



IMU 




DPP. 


I 


Penn State 


2 


-> 


Penn State 





11 


George Washington 


10 





Citadel 


15 


5 


Citadel 


1 


14 


Charleston Southern 





6 


Coastal Carolina 


3 


1 


Coastal Carolina 


2 


5 


Coastal Carolina 





5 


Limestone 


8 


4 


Davidson 


5 


10 


Mount St. Mary's 


5 


4 


Richmond 


6 





Richmond 


3 


b 


Richmond 


9 


8 


Virginia Military 


5 


5 


East Carolina 


1 


7 


East Carolina 


3 


4 


East Carolina 


3 


7 


Virginia Commonwealth 


10 


5 


George Washington 


4 


4 


Old Dominion 


2 


3 


Old Dominion 


10 


1 


Old Dominion 


4 


14 


Mount St. Mary's 


3 


2 


Maryland 


4 


7 


Maryland-Eastern Shore 


5 


6 


William and Marv 


5 


8 


William and Marv 


9 





Radford 


17 


10 


Virginia Military 


6 





UNC Wilmington 


5 





UNC Wilmington 


5 


8 


UNC Wilmington 


4 


3 


Virginia 


6 


10 


Virginia Tech 


5 


3 


George Mason 


2 


13 


George Mason 


3 


4 


Maryland-Bait. County 


7 


11 


Virginia Tech 


2 


8 


Howard 


5 


21 


Howard 


5 


16 


Howard 


2 


5 


Tow'son State 


6 


1 


Towson State 


6 


5 


Maryland 


6 


2 


East Carolina 


1 


5 


George Mason 


n 


4 
HI 


Old Dominion 


13 


GHLIGHTS 






•The Dukes had a 






winning season for 






the 21st consecutive 




fr 


year 


• 


^K' 


w, 


•They went 2-2 in 


m 


l\ 


Feb 


ruary, 12-9 in 


^ 


\ 


March, 11 -8 in April, 


1 1 


r^j 


and 1-5 in May; they HB^^ 


ri^ 


batted over .300 as a ^B^l 


Ivl 


team. ^^ 1 


y 


PEP TALK ♦Coach | ')\} 


y 


Ray Heatwole gives thJ^JJ* 


■ 


Dukes last minute H^ 


■ 


advice before a home |^|V 


■ 


game. The Dukes have^^\ 


■ 


won 


370 games at Lon*% i 


■ 


Field-Mauck Stadium ^|^\\] 


■ 


Com 


olex. ^ 


■ 




Giitlfoifle 



Giiilfoyle 



Gui!foi/lc 



116 



Baseball 




uilloyh' 

STRIKE ♦ Whit Babcock hurls the 
ball home. Babcock had three saves. 



STRIKE ZONE ♦ Dukes pitcher, 
Larry Mitchell, sends the baseball 
rifling to the catcher, Mike Hubbard. 
The Dukes had a total of 293 
strikeouts. 




DIAMOND DUKES FINISHED ABOVE 
.500 IN SEASON OF ADVERSITY 




They repeated this trend later 
in the year, winning against 
Virginia Tech once and then 
Howard three times, only to 
lose the next three games. The 
Colonial Tournament began 
with another victory over ECU 
behind Larry Mitchell's pitch- 
ing, but the Dukes then fell to 
George Mason and Old Do- 
minion in subsequent rounds. 
Although the team did not 
reach its goal of winning the 
CAA tournament and thus 
advancing to regional play, 
there were individual 
standouts that received recog- 
nition. Kevin Nehring was the 
first freshman in the eight year 

HEADS UP ♦ Taking a defensive 
stance, Jeff Kaufman prepares for a 
ground hit in the infield. The Dukes 
had a .952 fielding percentage and 
only 87 errors. 



history of the CAA to be named 
to the All-Conference team. 
Mike Hubbard was named 
MVP of the CAA and was 
drafted by the Chicago Cubs. 
Larry Mitchell was also 
drafted, to the Philadelphia 
Phillies' organization. Rob 
Mummau was greatly re- 
spected by his teammates, such 
as freshman Dan McCann, who 
said "Mummau is outstanding 
in all aspects of the game — he 
loves the game of baseball." 

In individual statistics, Mike 
Hubbard led the team in al- 
most every major offensive cat- 
egory, boasting a .397 batting 
average, 44 RBls, and 28 stolen 
bases. Jeff Kaufman and Kevin 
Nehring both also had very re- 
spectable batting averages, 
both finishing at .344. 
Mummau totaled 67 hits,which 

Baseball 



was second only to Hubbard. 
Among pitchers, Greg 
Whiteman led the Dukes with 
the lowest ERA at 1.13. Other 
notable pitching performances 
were Larry Mitchell's shutout 
game against Penn State and 
Rick Croushore's team high 58 
strikeouts for the season. 

Although the season was 
full of inconsistencies and 
problems, the Dukes finished 
above the .500 mark for the 
21st consecutive year in Madi- 
son history. The ups and downs 
of the season for the team did 
not prevent the individual 
members from making excep- 
tional efforts on the diamond 
in 1992. 

-Brian Tetro 
Heather Gustin 




-,t .ftm IjP^- I* ^^^4i|l-.)||, 



Spi'rN Al,'./i« Sci 



Front Row: Trainer Karen Honaker, Jeff Kaufman, Brian Morabtto, Dave Boneillo, Chris Williams, Mike Venafro, Jon Walsh, Rob 
Mummau, Corey Reffner, Trainer Jill Koenig. Second Row: Hugh Broomall, Joe Lucas, Chad Cinder, Chris Fastiggi, Scott Forester 
Ian Hall, Kevin Nehring, Mike Mitchell, Paul Koch, Jerry Burton, Coach Ray Heatwole. Third Row: Coach Kevin Anderson, Jason 
Troilo, Dan McCann, Chris Slonaker, Terry Whitesell, Kevin Woody, Whit Babcock, Rick Croushore, Greg Whiteman, Chad 
ChrisHne, Mike Hubbard, Larrv Mitchell. 



Baseball ^^Y 




MEN'S TRACK TEAM CONTINUES TO 
MAKE A NAME FOR JMU PROGRAM 



Awhile most JMU students 
were enjoying the new spring 
season, JMU's men's track team 
was bonding with the Godwin 
track. Daily practice was cru- 
cial in reaching the level of ex- 
cellence that coach Bill Walton 
wanted and expected. This 
urge to excel led to decisive 
team wins and individual suc- 
cess. 

On the topic of records and 
achievement, one name stood 
out from the rest: Jerry Roney. 
As a junior, Roney demolished 
the previous school record in 
the 11 0-meter hurdles by run- 
ning 1 3.64, which qualified him 
to compete in the 1992 Olym- 
pic trials. It was in New Or- 
leans that Jerry broke the record 
again with a 13.56, finishing in 
a spectacular fifth place. Roney 
also qualified for the Intercol- 
legiate championships in the 
400-meter hurdles, 4X100- 
meter relay and the 100-meter 
run. 

Individual success helped 
JMU dominate the competition 



at the Intercollegiate champi- 
onships in Boston, Massachu- 
setts. After two days of gruel- 
ing competition, JMU finished 
an impressive third place out 
of seventy-five 

teams. JMU's 

4X1 00-meter relay 
composed of Eric 
Jones, Tevis 

Brunson, Kelly 
Hawkins and 
Roney finished in 
third place. Mean- 
while, long distance 
champion Matt 
Holthaus sped to a 
fourth place finish. 
"I was very pleased with my 
performance," commented 
Holthaus. 

While most of the team 
concentrated on increasing 
speed, some runners were go- 
ing more for consistency. Chris 
Straub and Chris Baker, both 
1 0,000 meter runners, qualified 
for the championships. 

"Even though we all prac- 
tice for different events, we are 



"Even though 

we all practiced 

for different 

events, we are 

still a team, and 

that is what 
keeps us going." 

♦ 



still a team, and that is what 
keeps us going," said Tom Jef- 
frey. While team unity was the 
bond that kept most JMU teams 
together, this was especially 
true for the men's 
track team. Travel- 
ing to places like 
Philadelphia , Bos- 
ton and Raleigh for 
various events 
drew the team even 
closer by making it 
necessary for them 
to spend a lot of 
time together. "I 
have a great bunch 
of kids this year," 
commented Coach WaIton,"If 
the guys next year are half as 
good, I know I'll have a great 
year." -Joe Olson 

CONCENTRATION* Sophomore 
Matt Holthaus gets a jump on the 
pack at the start of the 1500M race. 
Holthaus consistently placed well for 
the cross country and track teams. 




VIEW FROM ABOVE ♦ 
Jerry Roney clears the 
last hurdle in the 110m 
event, pulling away 
from his opponents. 



UP AND OVER ♦ Scott Jackson 
clears a barrier in the grueling 3000 
meter steeple chase that lasts for 
seven and a half laps. 



PUMP YOU UP* Tom Greene displays his 
muscles while attempting to cool down. Weight 
training was important for added strength and 
endurance. 




Btiiliif 



^ ^ 8 ^P""§ Sports 





Men's Track 




Ciitlfoyle 



Front Row: Chris Straub, Billy Fettig, Chris Baker, Tevis Brunson, Mark Thurston, Kelly 
Hawkins, Andrew Dattelbaum. Back Row: Tom Jeffrey, Tom Greene, Matt Holthaus, 
Dave HoUiday, Jim Cheatham, Eric Jones, Justin Bessichio, Jerry Roney, Scott Jackson, 
Shawi\ Foreman, Mike Marshall, Paul Moye, Rob Moadley, Jeff Thompson, Jay Thomas, 

Fllint ^rirhman 




Giiilfoyle 




PRACTICE, PRACTICE* 
Jerry Roney, whose 
specialty was the 110 
meter hurdles, and Kelly 
Hawkins circle the track 
during practice. 



HIGHLIGHTS 

• The Dukes, having 
qualified in thirteen 
1 '\ents, finished third out 
of seventy-five teams at 
the 1C4A championships 
in Boston on May 23-24; 
Jerry Roney took first in 
both the 110m and 400m 
hurdles; the 4xl00m re- 
lay team (Eric Jones,Tevis 
Brunson,Kelly Hawkins, 
Jerry Roney) finished 
third and Matt Holthaus 
fourth in the 1,500m run. 



• The team finished third at the CAA 
Championships in Harrisonburg on 
April 11; Roney won his events, the 
4x100 relay took first, the 4x400 relay 
finished second as did Paul Moye in 
the 400m hurdles and Matt Holthaus 
in the 800m run, Tom Jeffrey took 
third in the 10,000 meter event. 

• At the Tar Heel Invitational on 
May 1 6, Roney tied the school record 
in the 400m' hurdles (51.06) and 
Holthaus set the school standard in 
the 800m (1:50.67) 

• At the 1992 US Olympic Trials in 
New Orleans on June 26-28, Roney 
got his best effort in the finals round 
(13.52) of the 110m hurdles. 



FLYING HIGH* Justin 
Bessichio flies through 
the air while compet- 
ing in the long jump. 



EXHAUSTED ♦Billy 
Fettig eyes the clock to 
determine the outcome 
of his race. 



Men's Track 



119 



HIGHLIGHTS 

•The Dukes finished 
2nd at the CAA 
championships; they 
finished 8th at the 
EC AC Indoor Cham- 
pionships, !3thatthe 
Outdoor Champion- 
ships and 15th at the 
Penn Relays. 
•Through the season 
the team members set 
seventeen school 
records. 

•Julie Speights; 
NCAA All-American 
•Katrina Allen, 
Stephanie Herbert, 
Tiombe Hurd, Patrica 
Ritter, Speights, 
Davida Walker, 
Kaystyle Madden, 
Janai Hill: All-East 
Honors (various 
events) 

•Susan Ferrel, Hurd, 
Ritter, Speights, 
Walker, Shelby 
Brown, Kim Will- 
iams, Erica Bates: 
CAA Champions 
(various events) 
•Speights: ECAC 
Champion (1500m ) 
•Hurd: Penn relays 
college champion 
(Triple Jump) 
•Amy Taylor: 9th in 
2000m Steeplechase, 
1992US01vmpicTri- 
als 



RUNNING WITH THE PACK* Liz 
Heaney commands the pace of the 
3000 meter race against ECU. 
Distance runners logged high 
mileage and intense track workouts 
to prepare for the season. 










FRONT ROW Theresa Prebish, Christine Corey, Jackie Lynch, Julie Speights, Kaystvle Madden, Davida Walker. 
Middle Row: Jennifer Clarkin, Melissa Freda, Stephanie Herbert, Janai Hill, Shelby Brown, Kim Williams, Erica Bates, 
Liz Heaney. Back Row: Joanne Ware, Deitra Dobbins, Katrina Allen, Tiombe Hurd, Kim Schlemmer, Susan FerreL 
Patricia Ritter, Amy Taylor, Cindv Price. 



I 2-0 Spring Sports 





In 



m In 



nl 




WOMEN COMPETED THEIR 

WAY TO SEVENTEEN 

RECORDS 




^ Victory! That was the one 
word that followed the 
women's track and field team 
throughout the 1992 season. 
With every new meet came 
success for JMU, either by a 
meet win or a new school 
record. The women's team 
broke seventeen records in all, 
qualifying two women to go to 
the NCAA championships in 
Austin, Texas. Senior Juli 
Speights qualified in the 1,500 
meter run, finishing tenth over- 
all, while freshman star Tiombe 
Hurd qualified in the triple 
jump, finishing thirteenth. 

Not only did JMU qualify 
two women for the NCAA 
championships, runner Amy 
Taylor qualified for the U. S. 
Olympic trials in New Orleans 
in the 2,000 steeplechase. "Just 
being there was a great honor," 

OFF THE BLOCK ♦ Getting a good 
jump at the opening gun, Kimberly 
Williams eyes the track ahead. Such 
efforts helped the women to break 
seventeen school records. 



commented Taylor, "The word 
'Olympics' alone sends a chill 
down my spine." 

Team unity led the way for 
individuals to shine 

throughout the sea- 

son. "We all help 
each other," said 
Tiombe Hurd, "if 
someone needs that 
extra push, we're 
there to do it." Al- 
though most of the 
team trained sepa- 
rately and com- 
peted in different 
events, team unity 
was still strong. 

Patricia Ritter, who broke 
four records in all, was the C A A 
champion in the 10,000 meter 
run, and achieved All-East hon- 
ors for the 3,000 meter-run. 
Speights, broke five records, 
was named NCAA All Ameri- 
can, won All-East honors in 
the indoor mile run and the 
outdoor 1,500 meter run and 
was named the team's co-most 



"We all help 
each other, if 
someone 
needs that 
extra push, 
we're there to 
do it." 
♦ 



outstanding athlete along with 
Hurd. The whole team contrib- 
uted, though, as JMU claimed 
nine All-East honors, six more 
than in the previ- 

ous year. In the 

CAA, Madison 
made their pres- 
ence felt with six 
awards and a sec- 
ond place overall 
finish. 

Coach Gwen 
Harris was over- 
joyed with her 

team's success. "It 

was a combination 
of old talent and new blood," 
she said. Harris also com- 
mented on how she looked for- 
ward to the next year and the 
future success of each indi- 
vidual and the team as a unit. 
As for the 1992 season, com- 
bining seasoned veterans with 
new talent opened the way for 
a winning season. 

-Joe Olson 





STKi:TCH*Davida 
Walker concentrates on 
the hurdle as she pulls 
away. 



Cuilfoytc 

SOLO FLIGHT ♦ 
Runner Jennifer 
Clarkin paces herself in 
an important race. 



Women's Track \i2-\ 





STRENGTH ♦Bill Scudder searches the stands for 
spirited fans. Male cheerleaders were important 
for cheers, stunts and also for pepping up fans. 



^=^ JMU Cheerleaders Keep Spirits High 

Throughout the Year 



▼ The cheerleading squad was 
one whose virtues of school 
pride and dedication were in- 
extricably linked. Under the 
tutelage of Casey Carter, who 
also served as athletic academic 
coordinator, the 1992 squad 
was one comprised of both 
veterans and 'new faces' alike. 
Experienced co-captains Jim 
Clingenpeel and Caralisa 
Thome embodied the spirit of 
the team and helped to ensure 
the program's stability from 
one year to the next. 

Part of the challenge for the 
cheerleaders was the variety of 
skills that the participation re- 
quired : Coach Carter described 
the cheerleader's job as a "hy- 
brid of many activities." While 
the athleticism of gymnastics 
was a necessary ingredient, 
prospective candidates for the 
team also had to develop and 
display an ease of performance. 



These two factors, coupled 
with powerful vocal chords, 
all went into the making of the 
consummate cheerleader. 

"We have a year-round 
commitment to cheerleading," 
noted Jim Clingenpeel. "In the 
fall we cheer for football, in the 
winter and spring it's basket- 
ball season, and then we com- 
pete for nationals." The heavy 
schedule, frequent visits to the 
weight room, and even pre- 
game stretching and warm-ups 
attest to the cheerleaders' dedi- 
cation. The hard work and per- 
severance produced just re- 
wards, though, as cheerleading 
earned greater respect within 
the realm of inter-collegiate 
sports. 

In something of a rebuild- 
ing year, the cheerleaders fos- 
tered an atmosphere of inspi- 
ration at JMU at sporting events 
and even during their own 

Cheerleading 



practices; the residents of the 
lake area enjoyed the spectacle 
of pyramids and acrobatic 
stunts as they strolled back 
fromD-Hall. "We have an un- 
precedented number of first- 
year cheerleaders this year, but 
everyone is working hard and 
this looks like the best squad 
we've had in awhile," said 
Caralisa Thome. At camp dur- 
ing the summer, the squad 
competed in the categories of 
"sideline", "fight song", and 
"cheer", doing well in each: 
"We placed in all three, which 
was a great accomplishment 
considering most of the squad 
had never cheered at the col- 
lege level before," noted 
Thorne. The cheerleading 
squad continued its successful 
reign at various invitationals 
and competitions and main- 
tained its embodiment of the 
JMU spirit. -Brian Tetro 




■rent Row: Erin Walsh, Jim Chngenpeel, Amy Elliot, Brian Hutchison, Kerri 
-lahn. Bill Scudder, Himter Wortham, Caralisa Thorne, Greg Pappanastos, 
ferri Fleming, Jason Mitchell, Leni Suguitan. Second Row; Nathan Lyon, 
leather Mack, Joseph Linn, Katy Dudley, Che Torry, Natahe Evans, Rodney 
^tienza, Michelle Williams, Dave Mills. 



Guilfoi^U' 

SPIRIT* MelanieByrd 
pumps up the crowd 
sitting in the bleachers 
opposite the home 
fans. 



I 2-2- Sports Feature 





FIGHT ♦ Erin Walsh aids the fans to 
participate in the Go, Fight, Win 
cheer. Cheerleaciers often used signs 
to increase student participation 
during the football games. 




LOOK MA* Hunter Wortham and CHILVARY* JMU male cheerlead- 

Caralisa Thorne perform a difficult ers gallantly offer their knees to the 

cupie during the homecoming game, ladies for a break. The cheerleaders 

Strength and balance were necessi- put in many hours of practice in 

ties for many stvmts. 1992. 



Giiilfoyle 



Cheerleading '1 2 "^ 



POISED ♦ Amy Murphy holds ste.idy 
before releasing her arrow. The mixed 
team placed fourth in the U. S. Intercol- 
legiate Championships in 1992. 




Archery 





kJ 


1. 


Mr'"S' ^m 


^WA.J 


I ^H 


Ihlu-k 


Left to right: 
Andv Pucket 


Steve Fernand 
Amy Murphy, 


iz, Jeff Koch, Zadock 
Mike Oglivie. 


Cropper, 






M 



-The men's team won the 
Wooten Open on February 
22-23 and finished sixth in 
the U.S. Intercollegiate 
Championships; the mixed 
team won the Atlantic City 
Classic and the Pennsylvania 
Indoor Tournament, finish- 
ing fourth in the Intercolle- 
giate Championships. 

-Christina Preston: All- 
America; U.S. Indoor/East 
Region Champion; Virginia 
All-Academic Third Team; 
18th at Olympic Trials; 
Women's Team most Out- 
standing Archer. 



-Jeff Koch: All-America; 
Wooten Open Champion, 
JMU Invitational 720 Cham- 
pion, Men's Team Most Out- 
standing Archer. 
-Andy Pucket: Pennsylvania 
Indoor Champion; Virginia 
Indoor Champion. 

TOURNAMENTS 

Pennsylvania Indoor Tournament 

Virginia Indoor Tournament 

Wooten Open Tournament 

U.S. Indoor/East Region Tourn. 

U.S. Indoor Nat'l Tournament 

JMU Invitational 

Atlantic City Classic 

U.S. Intercollegiate Championships 



ALL TOGETHER ♦ Christine 
Preston and Zadock Cropper take 
aim in the archery room. Friendships 
developed quickly between archers. 



^ 2 T- Sp^ng Sports 





Archers continued bringing home 
awards in 1992. 




^ Archery was one of JMU's 
most successful sports in 1992, 
despite the fact that it was also 
one of the most unheard of. 
The nationally ranked Dukes 
were led by a duo of archers, 
Christina Preston and Jeff 
Koch, that were not only domi- 
nant athletes, but also success- 
ful in the classroom as well. 

Christina Preston led the 
women with an unprecedented 
ten titles to her name. These 
included the U.S. Indoor/ East 
Region Champion, Atlantic 
City Classic Champion, and the 
Pennsylvania and Virginia In- 
door Champion. Above all, 
though, were her ranking as an 
Ail-American and her invita- 
tion to perform in the U.S. 
Olympic trials in Tempe, Ari- 
zona. "The Olympic trials were 
a real challenge," she 

FOCUSED ♦ Drawing the bow string 

back past his chin, Andy Pucket peers 

confidently at his target. Pucket was 

the Pennsylvania and Virginia Indoor 

Champion in 1992. 



commented. "It was a real test 
of concentration." Preston was 
also named to the Virginia All- 
Academic third team for main- 
taining a high G.P.A. while 
competing. "It is 
really hard balanc- 
ing school and 
competition," she 
said, "but you just 
have to get used to 
it." 

Jeff Koch, power 
of the men's team, 

was also awarded 

with All-American 
honors. With many awards 
under his belt, it was not sur- 
prising that he did so well at 
the U.S. Intercollegiate Cham- 
pionships, placing eleventh. 
For his talent and willingness 
to help his teammates, he was 
awarded the men's team Most 
Outstanding Player. 

Amy Murphy, a newcomer 
to the team, commented, "Ev- 
eryone helped me get into the 
swing of things. I couki not 



"Everyone 
helped me get in 
to the szvuig of 
tilings. I could 
not have done it 
zoithont them." 
♦ 




have done it without them." 
The archery team members de- 
veloped friendships among 
themselves and among the 
members of opposing teams. 
Murphy noted 
that,"you see the 
same people at al- 
most every meet. ..it 
makes the meet 
more special." 
In 1992, the mixed 
team went 14-8, 
winning the Atlan- 
tic City Classic and 
the Pennsylvania 
Indoor tournament. Andy 
Pucket was both, the Pennsyl- 
vania and Virginia Indoor 
champion. 

Coach Margaret 
Horn wanted to excel in the 
1992 season, for it was her 
last at JMU. She said, "I could 
not have asked for a better 
going away present." 

-Joe Olson 




EYE FOR AN EYE* 
Steve Fernandez 
focuses on the bullseye. 
The men's team won 
the Wooten Open. 



PREPARED* 
Jeff Koch and Christina 
Preston inspect their 
equipment after 
another practice. 



Archery i 23 






Traditions, Superstitions and Rituals 
Among JMU Athletes 



♦ We watched as our teams 
had winning streaks, attribut- 
ing them to superior skill. 
When they had losing streaks, 
it was bad luck. While our ath- 
letes worked hard to gain those 
skills, quite a few of them be- 
lieved in rituals or supersti- 
tions, as a team and person- 
ally, which helped them make 
it through their successes and 
losses. 

Many athletes ate certain 
foods before games, "Not so 
much for ritual , but for health 
reasons," said Trey Weiss, 
kicker for the football team. He 
and his teammates ate spa- 
ghetti and chicken the night 
before most games. A member 
of the women's golf team had 
to eat an apple before every 
game, and Susan Ferrell of 
women's track drank a glass of 
grapefruit juice the mornings 
of her meets. Not so healthy 
was baseball player Rob 
Mummau's "diet" of a coke 
slushee and two granola bars 
when he was on a winning 
streak. 

In the locker rooms, the 
teams usually got ready for the 



competitions the same way. 
Dana Albertella said the 
women's soccer team had a 
distinct routine . When some- 
thing or someone messed up 
the routine, the team would 
get nervous. The football team 
had a team prayer before its 
games. Many of the athletes, 
however, prepared for the 
game with a little bit of per- 
sonal time. Julia Tock of the 
fencing team said, "I always 
listen to 'Caught Up in You' by 
38 Special when I'm waiting 
for my turn to go up on the 
strip. It makes me less nervous, 
relaxes me." 

On the field, the women's 
soccer team walked by their 
opponents in a two-line for- 
mation, silent and not looking 
at them, to intimidate them. 
Football players had to touch a 
sign above the locker room 
door that read, "Those that re- 
main will be champions," be- 
fore heading out to the field. 
Many of the teams had pre- 
game chants and huddles. 
Karlene Lydic said that the 
defense of the women's la- 
crosse team would raise their 



sticks together and say, "Won- 
der Twin Powers activate; form 
of World Cup Lacrosse play- 
ers!" before they started to play. 

Numbers were a big super- 
stition among athletes. Ferrell 
warmed up with a six-minute 
run and five discus throws. 
Jaynes carried coins in her 
pocket while playing golf. "I 
like to shoot in the 70's," she 
said, "so all my coins are '71 or 
'72." Hill Mallory of men's golf 
said the penny he used to mark 
his ball "has to be below 1 972 ." 
Mallory said that his team 
members had one ritual for 
when they performed badly. 
They would flush their clubs 
in the toilet. "It's paying hom- 
age to the golf god and to flush 
away the bad strokes," he 
mused. 

Most of the rituals and su- 
perstitions had no direct pur- 
pose behind them. Whether 
using the same equipment or 
wearing certain clothes, most 
of the athletes' reasons were 
summed up by Samuels: "You 
stay with whatever is work- 
ing." 

-Tiffany Gobbi 




TALL ORDER ♦Vladimir Cuk, basketball center, 
is fed by Jennifer Lemond. Many athletes 
coordinated their meals during the season. 



^ 2 O Sports Feature 



CHEW ♦Rob Mummau spits his mixture of 
bubble gum and tobacco on the foot of unlooking 
teammate Chris Slonaker as Jason Troilo looks on. 



TRADITION ♦ DeVinchi Arnold touches the sign 
above the locker room door as the whole team 
does on the way to the football field. Football 
players often patterned their diets, clothes and 
lifestyles so that they could maintain winning 
ways. 

RIGHT ON TIME ♦ Archer Mike Oglivie concen- 
trates before a shot. He always wears his watch in 
commemoration of his father. Athletes in many 
sports wore articles of clothing that they felt 
helped them to compete. 




m 

'■■•■ ^ i, 

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WINNER ♦Jonas Cikotas strokes a forehand shot 
down the alley in a practice match. Team member 
Jamie Samuels said he would use the same tennis 
ball if he won the point before with it. 




ODD ISN'T IT?^ Kicker Trey Weiss warms up on 
the sidelines before the homecoming game against 
Northeastern. Weiss always ended his warmup on 
an odd-numbered kick so that he would enter the 
game for an even-numbered one. 



Superstitions and Rituals \^/ 




INDIVIDUALS EXCELLED IN 

CHALLENGING SECOND SEASON 

UNDER SCHERER 




♦ Before the start of the 1992 
football season, JMU was 
ranked sixteenth. This ranking, 
along with the memories of the 
previous year's record of 8-3 
gave JMU fans something to 
look forward to. Coach Rip 
Scherer was back and ready 
for victory. The 1991 season 
had been the first time since 
1987 that JMU had made it to 
the playoffs, and the Dukes had 
high expectations to meet for 
the 1992 season. 

The season began with a 
drive down to Blacksburg for a 
meeting with the Virginia Tech 
Hokies. The Dukes stayed neck 
and neck with the Division I-A 
turkeys for all of the first half, 
going into the locker rooms tied 
at fourteen apiece. Unfortu- 
nately, that was the closest JMU 
would come. Virginia Tech 
dominated the second half, 
outscoring the Dukes 35-6. 
"They did a good job of find- 
ing the holes in our 



defense, "commented senior 
linebacker Jim Chroniger. "The 
big play hurt us, and that is one 
of the things we were trying to 
concentrate on this year." Tech 
had four touchdowns of 40 
yards or more, which ac- 
counted for a large part of their 
581 yards of total of- 
fense. ' 

JMU's second 
game was a road 
trip down route 64 
to Richmond. 
Richmond's aspira- 
tions were not 
great, partly be- 
cause of their pre- 
vious year's record 
of 2-9, but somehow 

the Spiders rallied 

to win 49-40. "This 
had to be my most disappoint- 
ing loss at JMU,"said coach 
Scherer. JMU's offense worked 
hard to catch up with the Spi- 
ders, but their comeback hopes 
were extinguished by a botched 



"It definitely 

felt good to get 

back on track- 

-to get that old 

feeling from 

last year 

back." 

♦ 



two-point conversion attempt 
which left the Dukes with only 
three minutes to pull off two 
more scoring plays. JMU high- 
lights included Eriq Williams 
with 308 total yards, going 17 
for 26, and wide receiver John 
Allen's 55-yard catch. 

After going 0-2, the 

Dukes needed to 

prove themselves, 
especially because 
their next game was 
at home against 
Hofstra. In front of 
over 10,000 fans, the 
Dukes rallied to beat 
the Dutchman 38-6. 
"It definitely felt 
good to get back 
ontrack — to get that 
old feeling from last 
year back," commented senior 
tailback Kenny Sims. 

SUPERMAN ♦ Kenny Sims hurdles 
the pack in a 21-14 victory over tenth 
ranked William and Mary. Playing 
with a cracked tibia, Sims rushed for 
155 yards. 




SURE FOOTED* Elvin 
Brown fights his way 
past Appalachian State 
for a five yard gain. 



AIR ATTACK* Quaferback Eriq 
Williams releases a pass to David 
McLeod. The Williams-McLeod duo 
terrorized opposing teams in 1992. 





i28 Fall Sports 






CHAMPIONS ♦ The Dukes celebrate after a dose Homecoming win over 
Northeastern. The win bolstered the football team's conficience and helped 
the alumni enjoy returning to Madison. 



HIGHLIGHTS 
-The Dukes won three in a row against Hofstra, #1 Youngstown State, and 
Norhteastern, outscoring the opponents 125-89. 

-The team beat William and Mary for the second season in a row, making 
Coach Scherer undefeated against his alma mater. 
-The offense averaged over 400 yards and about 30 points per game. 
-Kenny Sims averaged over six yards per carry and 120 yards per game 
rushing. 

-Quarterback Eriq Williams accounted for over 220 yards per game in 
passing and rushing. 

-David McLeod averaged over five receptions for 80 yards per game. 
-Jim Chroniger and Don Phelps led the team in tackles, while Chroniger and 
Clint Dunn led in assists; Julius Williams and Chroniger led in sacks; J.C. 
Hall had two blocked kicks and Chris Parrott led with six interceptions 
going into the last game. 

-Dwight Robinson and Elvin Brown both averaged over 23 yards per kickoff 
return. 

-Trey Weis kicked six field goals in a row, including a career-best 48 yarder, 
after missing his first two attempts of the season. 



JMU 

20 

40 

38 

52 

35 

21 

17 

21 

21 

31 

37 



SCORES 

Va. Tech 

Richmond 

Hofstra 

Youngstown St. 

Northeastern 

Appalachian St. 

Ga. Southern 

Towson St. 

William and Mary 

Liberty 

Central Florida 



UP AND OVER ♦Tight end Ryan 
Anderson dives for a first down 
against Northeastern. As in 1991, the 
Dukes continued their proficiency at 
moving the ball and putting points 
on the board. 



DEVASTATOR* Linebacker 
Michael Jansen forces the Tribe's 
quarterback to fumble the ball deep 
in their own terrritory. The defense 
held off JMU's in-state rival while 
the offense put them away. 




Football 



129 



INDIVIDUALS EXCELLED IN 

CHALLENGING SECOND SEASON 

UNDER SCHERER 




Sims personally rushed 108 
yards on 16 carries. 

This time it was the Dukes 
who were making the big plays. 
JMU made it 31-0 at the half, 
taking advantage of four first- 
half turnovers and quarterback 
Eriq Williams' 78-yard touch- 
down pass to junior David 
Mcleod in the second quarter. 
"The coaches shortened down 
the defensive package a bit and 
we just played ball," said 
cornerback Don Phelps. 

After the success of the 
Hofstra game, the Dukes trav- 
elled to Ohio to face the #1 team 
in Division 1-AA, Youngstown 
State. The Dukes were ready for 
revenge after their last meeting 
with the Penguins, a close game 
that ended up 28-21 for Young- 
stown. But this time the roles 
were reversed, with the Dukes 
sliding by Youngstown State 52- 
49. Eriq Williams led the way, 
going 12-16 for 306 yards and 



CHARGE ♦Fullback 
Steve Agee hits the 
hole created by Dion 
Foxx as Anthony Lopes 
follows to block. Agee 
was the third leading 
rusher on the team in 
1992. 



scoring three touchdowns. 
"The win felt good, but we still 
have a long way to 
go,"commented McLeod, who 
tied Redskin star Gary Clark's 
record with an amazing 185 
yards receiving. The win kept 

JMU's playoff 

hopes alive, giving 
them a 2-2 record 
and an impressive 
win. 

Homecoming 
was one of the most 
important games 
the Dukes played. 
Thousands of 
alumni poured into 
Bridgeforth stadium to see the 
much talked about football 
team. Like a replay of the Tech 
game, the Dukes and the Hus- 
kies were tied at halftime, 24- 
24. But this time, Scherer's boys 
were ready. "We got big plays 
from guys we needed to get 
big plays from,"said defensive 



"We got big 
plays from 

guys we 
needed to get 

big plays 



from." 



coordinator Jim Fletcher. It was 
the defense that dominated the 
second-half, compensating for 
two offensive turnovers. 

On October 10, 1992 over 
14,000 students and parents 
piled into the stadium for the 
annual parents' 
weekend festivities. 
The Dukes were up 
against Appala- 
chian State, ranked 
only one behind 
JMU in the pre-sea- 
son poll. The Moun- 
taineers and the 
Dukes had met 
eleven times before, 
with ASU leading the series 8- 
3. ASU increased that number 
to nine when they slid pass the 
Dukes 27-21. 

STARE DOWN ♦ Malik Moody 
watches the game with intense 
determination. The imposing tackle 
from New Jersey was a large part of 
the defensive line. 





WRAPPED ♦ The JMU defense stops 
an Appalachian carrier on the forty 
yard line. Crushing tackles were not 
rare when the JMU defense was on 
the field. 



i30 Fall Sports 






wr.?,?-,^^;.' 



OFF THE FINGERS ♦David 
Qutittlebaum knocks down a pass on 
third down. Quattlebaum stymied 
Northeastern in one of their last 
attempts to ruin the JMU Homecom- 
ing. 



\ 




IMPACT ♦JuHus Williams chases down the 
Appalachian State quarterback for another sack. 
Despite the effort, the Dukes lost to Appalachian 
State 27-21 before the home crowd. 



Ol(i//0l//f 






Cuilloi/lc 

TEAMWORK* Coach Clark talks 
with the defensive linemen while the 
offense takes the field. JMU coaches 
and players were always in close 
contact. 



MASTER PLANNER ♦ 
Head coach Rip 
Scherer calls a fourth 
down play from the 
sideline. A William and 
Mary alumnus, Scherer 
gave his alma mater all 
they could handle. 



CiiilfoyU- 



ITS GOOD* Trey 

Weis follows through 
on the extra point kick. 
Weis's consistency and 
length as kicker 
increased in 1992. 



Football i3i 



INDIVIDUALS EXCELLED IN 

CHALLENGING SECOND SEASON 

UNDER SCHERER 




JMU suffered a frustrating loss 
when they blew a large lead in 
the last quarter. 

The following week took the 
Dukes down to Stateboro, 
Georgia to face four time Na- 
tional Champions, Georgia 
Southern. The Eagles had beat 
the Dukes the previous year at 
home, edging JMU 24-21. "We 
really needed to take this 
game, "commented outside 
linebackerBilly Johnson, "be- 
fore this game we were 3-3. If 
we beat Georgia Southern that 
would show everyone that we 
can beat really tough teams and 
hopefully help our playoff 
chances. "Unfortunately, Geor- 
gia Southern repeated its per- 
formance, running past the 
Dukes 24-17. 

The Dukes continued their 
road trip, but this time they 
headed north towards Mary- 
land to battle it out with 
Towson State. Towson State's 
football program almost com- 
pletely folded in 1991 until 
many alumni rallied together 
to bail the team out. With con- 
tinuing problems following a 



poor record of 1-10 for the 1 99 1 
season, it was a big game for 
Towson State when they beat 
the Dukes 28-21. 

Even though JMU was 3-5 
after the Towson State defeat, 
the Dukes had some sources of 
pride. David 

McLeod, who had 
set JMU records in 
1991, catching 29 
passes for 634 yards, 
caught 45 passes for 
749 yards and he 
still had two games 
to go. Even though 
it did not show in 
their record, the 
Dukes had a potent 
offense. Williams threw 96 
times for 1,545 yards for the 
first eight games, almost beat- 
ing his 1991 record. 

JMU returned home to face 
the Tribe of William&Mary, 
who were ranked tenth in Di- 
vision 1-AA. Early in the game 
it looked like the visitors would 
take the win until the Dukes 
rallied, rushing by the Tribe 
21-14. "This was the best we 
have played all year from an 



"This was the 

best we've 
played all year 
from an offen- 
sive, defensive , 
and special 
teams stand- 



point." 



offensive, defensive,and spe- 
cial teams standpoint,"coach 
Scherer commented. The star 
of the game was Sims, who 
returned from a three week ab- 
sence due to a broken bone in 
his leg. Despite his injury, Sims 
rushed for 155 
yards and scored 
the winning touch- 
down. 

Game number 
ten was the Dukes' 
last home game of 
the season. It was 
also a necessary win 
if JMU was going to 
finish with a .500 
record. When Lib- 
erty snuck by with another 
fourth quarter comeback, the 
Dukes were guaranteed a los- 
ing season. 

Despite the season record. 
Coach Scherer was creating a 
winnmg chemistry on the team. 
JMU fans expected that, as 
Scherer molded his young pro- 
gram, Madison football would 
go to new heights. 

-Joe Olson 




FOOTLOOSE ♦Chris Parrott falls 
onto the pile in a home game against 
Northeastern. The homecoming 
game produced the Dukes' third 
winning effort in a row. 



BRACE YOURSELF ♦ 
Clint Dunn and Robert 
Smart force the Georgia 
Southern runner and 
blockers to their knees. 



HANGIN' TOUGH ♦ Outside 
Linebacker Julius Williams attempts 
to drag down Ga. Southern's 
quarterback in an away game. The 
Dukes lost the game 24-17. 



N 






#•* 



f 



^32. Fall Sports 




IN GOOD HANDS* David McLeod 
eyes the ball on his way to another 
big gain. McLeod was the number 
one receiver for JMU and averaged 
over 80 yards per game. 



HUMAN HURDLES* Wide receiver 
Dvvight Robinson vaults over the 
Northeastern defenders on a third 
down play. Robinson averaged 
about 25 yards as a kick returner. 




Football 



"^''^• 



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,if Sfi,.jNAfa/;i; Kc-L'i 



irst Kow: Chris Parrot, Elvin Brown, Don Phelps, Kenny Sims, Eriq Williams, Chris Thumian, John Lucas, Rip Scherer 
!)erek Spangler, Pat Carev, John Gaylord, Chris Sullivan, P.J. Caggiano, Jim Chroniger, Brian Kaglc. Second Row: BrenI 
lecrist. Matt Ricciardi, Joe Siegfried, Malik Moody, Marcus Carter, Ulysses Goodwin, Scott Frazier, Corev Roy, Aldo 

anestrari, Scott Laytield, Derek Radoski, David McLeod, Trey Weis, Brad Morris. Third Row: David Byerly, Marcus 
4cKinney, Jason Reynolds, Eric Bryant, Tyrone Washington, Robert Smart, Paul Jakaitis, Henrv' Booth, Ben Ackison, 

huck Cruso, John Kraus, Mike Long, Clint Dunn, Michael Jansen. Fourth Row: Steve Johnson, Mike Woolever, Kris 
)rendorff, Dion Foxx, Billy Johnson, Dwight Robinson, John Allen, Charles Bankins, Lee Cook, Steve Agee, Lamc)nt 
jooding, David Quattlebaum, J.C. Hall. Fifth Row: Juhus Williams, Clif Epps, DeVenchi Arnold, Renell Jones, Brian 
Vard, Lewis Cassada, Craig Wright, David Bailey, Ryan Anderson, Matt Smith, Scott McGuiney, B.j. Mahoney, Gary 
.yons, Mike McElhinney. Sixth Row: Rhad Miles, Steve Logan, Juan Dorsey, David Fleming, John Stein, Tony Jordan, 
ay Jones, Geoff CrawforcH, Gerald Smith, Bill Harper, Brad Hudgins, Karl Carter, Alonzo Bowler. Seventh Row: Kelvin 
eter, Dave Stewart, Mike Austin, Jason Rooney, Mark Yuska, Anthony Perret, Jesse Eppard, Michael Finch, Steve 
ackson, Richard Lightner, John Haudenshield, John Thomas, Charles Toth. Eighth Row: David Lee, Todd Jones, Shaur 
k^arshall, John Coursey, Bryan Jackson, Jude Boyle, Sean Goodwin, D'Artagnan Townes, Michael Howard, Akiba Byrd, 

larcus Cuttino. 



Football i33 




THE KING LIVES ♦During the 
Parents' Weekend festivities, Elvis 
Presley is spotted on the field 
performing with the dance squad to 
a medley of his songs. The dance 
squad was always trying to come up 
with new ideas for their routines. 



Dance S 




First Row: Co-captain Jennifer Reedy, Co-captain Caryn Pierce, Captain Andrea Dodge. Second Row: Mindy Aitker 
Natalie Celfond, Mandy Cole, Chi Nguyen, Amy Sieberkrob. Third Row: Rebecca Greenleaf, Kyra Liston, Patty Kim, 
Amelia Armendariz, Valerie Budney, Adrienne Brown. Not Pictured: Morgan Smith. 



^ Q A Sports Feature 



i 






^^^ 



DANCE SQUAD USED TALENT 

AND PEP TO KEEP JMU FANS 

ENTERTAINED 




♦ The JMU dance squad had 
placed sixth in the country in 
April, 1992, but it was not 
enough. They wanted more. 
They started in the middle of 
the summer with mini-camps 
and strength conditioning. 
They added a new head coach, 
Casey Carter, to help with the 
administrational aspects, and 
they returned to campus early 
to spend time working out and 
building chemistry. 

The chemistry of the squad 
was important, and the squad 
members were aware of it. 
They stuck together, sacrific- 
ing chunks of their summer 
vacation, as well as study and 
social time. They also lived 
together, went out together and 
had big sister / httle sister pairs 



REACHING FOR THE STARS ♦ 

Natalie Gelford, Mindy Aitken, and 
Patty Kim perform at halftime of a 
football game. Long hours were 
spent in preparation for the routines. 



to keep everyone involved. 

Plenty of work was done 
behind the scenes. 
The halftime shows 
were the results of 
constant drilling, 
weight training, cal- 
isthenics and 
aerobics. The squad 
worked out six 
times a week, often lifting 
weights early in the day, then 
drilling on new routines or 
doing aerobics later in the eve- 
nings. They were also active in 
the community, performing at 
local elementary schools, at the 
Valley Mall for the Duke Club 
and at tailgating parties before 
football games. 

The drills paid off during 
the football season as the danc- 
ers put on high impact half- 
time shows and delighted the 
audience. They pitched in with 
the cheerleaders during the 
game, cheering the football 



"We can do 
stuff that 's a lot 

funkier, and 
more intricate. " 

♦ 



team from the sidelines and 
visiting the puppy pound 
whenever possible. 
The squad 

stepped it up a 
notch during the 
basketball season. 
Dancer Adrienne 

Brown said, "It was 

my first time in a 
basketball atmosphere. It was 
a lot of fun! The crowd is dif- 
ferent [from football] and the 
music is all our own - it's more 
our style." Team captain An- 
drea Dodge said, "We can do a 
lot more moves in basketball 
since we're so much closer to 
the crowd. We can do stuff 
that's a lot funkier, and more 
intricate." The dancers con- 
stantly pushed for a level that 
would catapult them into the 
nationals for the third straight 
year. And this time they were 
going for number one. 

-Vasha Hunt 





MILLION DOLLAR SMILE ♦ Mandy 
Cole dances to the tune of the band 
at halftime. The dancers spread their 
enthusiasm to the crowd. 



FUNKY DIVA ♦Jen 
Reedy performs a 
complicated move 
during a night game. In 
addition to performing 
at games, the dance 
squad members also 
helped out with the 
"puppy pound" kids. 



HIGH SPIRITS* The dance squad 
members pep the crowd up during 
the halftime show. The dancers 
ususally worked in conjunction with 
the band. 



Dance Squad ^35 




=T?='==; 



MEN'S SOCCER TEAM ROSE 
ABOVE THE COMPETITION 




♦ Entering their 25th season, 
the men's soccer team had 
many accompHshments in the 
program's proud history to 
look back upon. At the same 
time, though, they looked for- 
ward to the immediate future 
witha senseof uncertainty. The 
Dukes returned only five start- 
ers for the 1992 season, having 
lost the core of 199Ts talented 
squad to graduation, and knew 
they had the most challenging 
schedule in the program's his- 
tory to contend with. Nonethe- 
less, the 25th season at JMU 
was destined to be a memo- 
rable one. 

In 1991, the Dukes estab- 
lished a school record by win- 
ning 17 games, with a team 
that took second in the Colo- 
nial Athletic Association tour- 
nament and seemed primed to 
make their first NCAA tourna- 
ment appearance since 1976. 
However, they were denied by 
the selection committee due to 
a weak out-of-conference 
schedule. In order to remedy 
the situation, coach Martin 
scheduled the perennial pow- 
ers, the University of North 



Carolina and Wake Forest for 
their first matches of the sea- 
son, hoping that the Dukes 
would make a respectable 
showing. Instead of settling for 
respectability, Martin's un- 
tested squad rose to the occa- 
sion and thwarted its ACC foes 
by convincing 
scores of 2-1 and 4- 
0, respectively. 

"Those wins 
were extremely sig- 
nificant to our pro- 
gram," said Coach 
Martin. "The team 
instantly went from 
questioning our- 
selves to believing 
in ourselves and it 
gave us national 
credibility within 
forty-eight hours." 

What the team lacked in ex- 
perience and individual flare, 
they more than made up for 
with teamwork. As the new 
players mixed with the veter- 
ans, they each accepted their 
roles and the team developed 
continuity. This new-found 
"synergy" propelled JMU to a 
6-0 start in which thev 

Men's Soccer 

"v 



"We were play- 
ing as a team 

and for the team, 
which doesn't 

always happen 

xvith a new mix 
of kids." 



outscored opponents 22-3 and 
were ranked as high as sixth in 
the nation by the Intercolle- 
giate Soccer Association of 
America poll. 

"Chemistry had an awful lot 
to do with it. We were playing 
as a team and for the team, 
which doesn't al- 
ways happen with 
a new mix of kids," 
explained Coach 
Martin. 

While the Dukes 
knew that they 
would have plenty 
of scoring punch on 
the forward line 
with the speedy se- 
nior pair of Ivan 
Sampson and Jeff 
Todd, what they 
did not count on 
was the tremendous success of 
freshman Patrick McSorley. 
McSorley recorded seven goals 
in the season's first six games, 
including a hat-trick in JMU's 
upset over sixth-ranked Wake 
Forest, on his way to breaking 
the school's freshman scoring 
record. 




First Row: Jeremy Olsen, Alberto Apodaca, David Villarreal, Chad Wilkinson, Brent Bennett, Ivan Sampson, Kevin 
Born. Second Row: Patrick McSorley, Bob Johnston, Chris Maltese, Jel^f Todd, Duncan Satchell, Mark Mathewson, 
Brian Albrecht, Enrico Gaglioti, K.P. Wawrzyniak, Glenn Hechler, Kaarlo Kankkunen. Third Row: Josh Baer, Todd 
Downen, Seth Coker, Stuart Halsall, David Clarke, Brian Bailey, Matt Blechner, Joe O'CarroU, David Bucciero, Kyle 
Swords, Mike Smith, Granville Woodson, Nathan Fairchild, Jon Pillion. 




tC^V ,i ^I'O}!-- \h\lkl l\< 



REJECTION ♦ Goalkeeper Joe O'Carroll grabs the 
ball before it goes into the JMU goal. O'Carroll 
finished the regular season with a total of 38 saves. 



^3S Fall Sports 




THIRST-AID ♦ Senior Ivan Sampson 
quenches his thirst on the sidelines 
in between halves. In his fourth year 
on the team, Sampson was an 
inspirational leader for the Dukes. 



GOOD ONE ♦ JMU player Bob 
Johnson shares a laugh with his 
opponent after play has stopped. 
The Dukes earned an NCAA bid for 
the first time since 1976. 





Highlights 

-Patrick McSorley and Brent 

Bennett led the Dukes' regular 

season offense with ten goals a 

piece. Five of Bennett's goals were 

game winners. McSorley added 

four assists and Bennett three. Bob 

Johnston and Ivan Sampson led in 

assists with nine and seven, 

respectively. 

-Goalkeeper Joe O'Carroll allowed 

only 12 goals in 18 games with 36 

saves and 6 shutout performances. 

-Sampson brought his career totals 

to 24 goals and 13 assists by the end 

of the regular season. 
-The Dukes started their season by 
opening with victories over UNC 
and 6th ranked Wake Forest; they 
continued with four more straight 
victories during which they 
outscored their opponents 16-2. 



TRICKY FOOTWORK ♦ Patrick 
McSorley heads upfield toward East 
Carolina's goal. JMU defeated the 
Pirates by a score of 3-0, one of their 
five regular season victories over a 
CAA foe. 



Courtt'sif of Sporli Media Resources 

ON THE RUN ♦ Kaarlo Kankkunen 
boots the ball as he continues 
toward his opponents' goal. One of 
the highlights of the Dukes' season 
was their 5-0 win over 13th ranked 
George Mason. 



X-^ 






Men's Soccer 



137 



USING YOUR HEAD ♦Kevin Born jumps to head 
the ball into the Marshall goal in a home game. 
The Dukes were 6-2 in games played at their home 
field. 

AGILITY* Kaarlo Kankkunen powers past the 
Marshall University player. The Dukes beat 
Marshall 4-2 at home. 








Hunt 




SCORES 




JMU 




OPP 


2 


North Carolina 


1 


4 


Wake Forest 





4 


Marshall 


2 


4 


Howard 





4 


UNC Wilmington 





4 


Delaware 








Virginia 


3 


3 


Mt. St. Mary's 


1 


1 


Towson State 





2 


George Mason 


3 


4 


American 





3 V 


irginia Commonwealth | 


1 


Old Dominion 





3 


East Carolina 





2 


Richmond 


] 


2 


William and Mary 


2 


1 


Maryland 


2 


9 


Monmouth 







DEFTLY DONE ♦ 
DavidVillareal evades 
the ECU defense. 



STRENGTH OF SAMPSON ♦ 
Ivan Sampson dribbles down the 
field toward his opponent's goal. 



138 ^^^^ ^p"'"*^ 



» 



OOKING AHEAD ♦ Brian Albrecht looks down 
le field for an open teammate to pass the ball to. 
Ibrecht hit the game winning goal in the CAA 
lampionship against William and Mary. 




MEN'S SOCCER TEAM ROSE 
ABOVE THE COMPETITION 



P 




McSorley provided the offense 
with a late game lift fromthe 
bench and his intense work 
ethic on the field proved to be 
an effective complement to the 
flashy style of Sampson. As op- 
posing defenses keyed on 
Sampson, who repeated as a 
first team All-CAA selection, 
the scoring lanes were left open 
for Todd and the offensive 
midfielders. 

Utilizing a five man 
midfield. Coach Martin placed 
responsibility on the halfbacks 
not only to set up the offense, 
but to score as well. The 1992 
unit proved to be more capable 
of taking control of a game and 
featured a pair of second team 
All-CAA players in the inter- 
national duo of Brent Bennett 
and freshman Kaarlo 
Kankkunen. Bennett recorded 
ten goals on the season, includ- 
ing five game winners while 
Kankkunen tallied six goals 
and four assists. Meanwhile, 
team captain Brian Albrecht, 
senior Alberto Apodaca and 
junior Chris Maltese brought 
stability and experience to the 
midfield and provided parity 
in the attack as the trio com- 



bined for nine goals. 

Defense posed a particular 
dilemma due to the gradua- 
tion of all three starters in the 
back. Rather than place new 
players in a high-pressure situ- 
ation. Coach Martin called 
upon his veterans to make the 
adjustment from their usual 
positions to defensive roles. 
Senior Kevin Born anchored 
the defense at sweeper and was 
rewarded with second team 
All-CAA honors for his efforts. 
Juniors Bob Johnston and K.P. 
Wawrzniak assumed the mark- 
ing back positions, but when 
Wawrzniak went down with a 
broken collar bone early in the 
season, sophomore David 
Villareal and freshman Nate 
Fairchild stepped up to the 
challenge. In goal, senior Joe 
O'CarroU held on to his start- 
ing position and recorded 10 
shutouts and an impressive 
0.78 goals against average. 

With the team coming to- 
gether offensively and defen- 
sively, the Dukes entered the 
CAA Championships with 
high hopes. They disposed of 
North Carolina Wilmington 1- 
in the first round and faced 




DILIGENCE ♦ David Villareal battles his Marshall 
opponents to get the ball upfield. Villareal scored 
the game winning goal against North Carolina this 



13th ranked George Mason in 
the second. Remembering a 3- 
2 loss to the Patriots in Octo- 
ber, JMU claimed a decisive 5- 
victory with the help of Kevin 
Born and Ivan Sampson, who 
scored two goals a piece. The 
Dukes then faced William and 
Mary in the championship 
game. The teams had played to 
a 2-2 tie two weeks before, but 
November 8th was a day for 
the Dukes who claimed a vic- 
tory, a championship and a 
NCAA bid with the 2-1 score. 
Born, the tournament MVP, 
scored again and Brian 
Albrecht had the game win- 
ner. 

-Dan Goldstein 



COOL4 Brent Bennett keeps his 
hands warm during a break in the 
game. Bennett had ten goals in the 
season and five were game winners. 



Men's Soccer 



139 



cL 





WOMEN'S SOCCER TEAM 

CONTINUED TO MAKE A 

NAME FOR THE PROGRAM 




♦ jMU's Women's Soccer 
team smashed its way through 
the season falhng just short of 
the NCAA playoffs. The Dukes 
beat 14th ranked Rutgers and 
played top 20 teams such as 
UVA, N.C. State, and William 
and Mary to the wire. The 
team spent most of the season 
in the top 20, and only missed 
the playoffs because of the lack 
of a postseason conference 
tournament. According to 
head coach Dave Lombardo, 
the lack of women's soccer pro- 
grams in the CAA prevented 
the Dukes from aligning with a 
conference. That meant the 
team would have to finish sec- 
ond in a region that was full of 
top 20 teams. Although it hurt 
the Dukes' chances to make 
the playoffs, Lombardo was 
happy with the independent 
status, because of the ease of 
scheduling top 20 teams, and 
the lack of weak sisters (typical 
of a conference set-up) wast- 
ing games. 



Against a schedule that in- 
cluded four top 20 teams the 
Dukes posted a 12-6-1 record, 
8-1 at home. They narrowly 
missed beating eighth ranked 
NC State, losing 3-1 in over- 
time, and almost sunk sixth 
ranked UVA. 

Captain LeeAnne 

Marinaccio said, "We played 
with a lot of heart [against 
UVA]." Captain Chantel 
Schwandt thought the Dukes 
were going to win in the wan- 
ing minutes of the 2-1 loss. She 
said, "we dominated them the 
last 20 minutes of the second 
half, we just didn't finish 
them." 

After the loss to UVA, the 
Dukes had their backs to the 
wall. They felt they would need 
to win all six remaining games 
to qualify for the playoffs. They 
defeated Creighton in a tour- 
nament, but fell to American 
four days later. They thought 
at the time that it was the end 
of any hopes for a bid, but the 



soccer polls did not register the 
loss when they beat Rutgers. 
The Dukes actually climbed in 
the polls to 1 4th in the country, 
the spot Rutgers had held. 

With the 1-0 victory over 
the Scarlet Knights in their fi- 
nal home game, it looked like 
the Dukes might qualify for 
theNCAAs. They would have 
to defeat William and Mary on 
the road to do it, though. They 
fell just short, dropping a tough 
2-0 game, and lost their hopes 
of a bid in the process. 

Nonetheless, the Dukes had 
served notice to several larger 
programs that the JMU pro- 
gram was not to be taken 
lightly. Coach Lombardo, in 
his third year at JMU improved 
to 38-20-1, and scheduled op- 
ponents that proved his team's 
worth. 

- Vasha Hunt 

FORCEFUL ♦ Junior Chantel 
Schwandt maneuvers away from her 
George Mason opponent. The Dukes 
went on to win the game, 3-2. 




FAST TRACK ♦ Despite being pulled 
by her uniform sleeve, LeeAnne 
Marinaccio continues her path 
towards her opponent's goal. 



^t\Q Fall Sports 



TRUE GRIT* The Dukes watch a 
tough game against George Mason. 
Team members supported each other 
on and off the field. 



BRIGHT LIGHT ♦ Shading the sun 
from her eyes, Carrie Proost waits 
for play to continue. The Dukes were 
12-6-1 overall. 








SCORES 






JMU 




OPP 




8 


Loyola, Md. 





American 1 


3 


George Mason 


1 


1 Rutgers 


3 


Wright State 


2 


William and Mary 2 





George Washington 





2 Cincinnati 1 


1 


UNC Greensboro 





1 Xavier, Ohio 3 


1 


North CaroHna State 


3 


HIGHLIGHTS 


3 


Radford 


1 


-On October 24th, the Dukes beat 


5 

4 
6 

4 


Temple 

Maryland 

Washington State 

Monmouth 

Maryland-Baltimore Co 


1 
1 
2 




thirteenth ranked Rutgers, 1-0. 

-The Dukes outscored their 

opponents 44-21 throughout the 

season. 

-The team posted seven shutouts in 


1 


Virginia 


2 


1992. 


1 


Creighton 


n 


-Coach Lombardo's record was 38- 
20-1 after three seasons. 



Women's Soccer 




ffsl/ c'^ Sports 



Front Row; Jennifer Donaldson, Karen Schulstad, LeeAnne Marinaccio, Chantel Schwandt 
Lori Strottman. Middle Row: Ashley Williamson, Lele Hossenlopp, Anne Metzger, Dana 
Albertella, Cheryl Carr, Susie Pizzurro, Carrie Proost, Julie Reule, Jon-nell Berry, Cathy 
Reid. Back Row: Coach Dave Lombardo, Jamie Dykes, Kristen Newill, Kim Tufts, Nikole 
Maslovs, Kerri O Connell, Brandy Stafford, Carrie Blumenthal, Katherine Carpenter, 
Heather lones, Alison Foley. 




FALLING STAR* Goalie Lori 
Strottman dives to catch the ball 
while warming up for a game. JMU 
goal keepers combined for 84 saves. 



POWER PLAY* Ashley Williamson 
deftly controls the ball against a 
UMBC player. The Dukes were 8-1 
at home in 1992. 



Women's Soccer ^ Z.J- "| 



SWING THROUGH ♦ Doug McCarthy 

plays a slight right to left off the tees in practice. 

McCarthy had an 80.2 scoring average in 1992. 

IN MOTION* Keeping his eye on the ball, Kyle 
Lemish slams a drive straight through the fairway. 
Lemish participated in the Washington &Lee 
Invitational, where the team finished fourth. 






^H 


^^^^KB^^W^^!^ 




Hk . ^^^^1 


H 




'^ x^W 

'^'^^(V. 


^^^^^^IE'*f 




^m ' ^ 


^_^^ 




- 


'* 



TRAPPED ♦ Pleasant Hughes blasts out of a 
bunker in a practice round. The team practiced at 
Spotswood Country Club off of Route 33 in 
Harrisonburg. 

SHOOTING STRAIGHT* Scott Graber concen- 
trates before putting the ball. Graber and Hill 
Mallory led the team, each with a 76.4 scoring 
average. 






L 




•» 



^^B^i^ii 



i A-2 Fall Sports 





1 







JMU GOLFERS HIT THEIR 

STRIDE AS THE SEASON 

PROGRESSED 



♦ Golf is a sport typically 
viewed as a leisure activity, 
enjoyed at posh country clubs 
and resorts. However, seven 
men at JMU knew the mental 
and physical challenge of com- 
peting in collegiate golf. 

Under the leadership of 
Coach Thomas Hurt, this year's 
golf team consisted of several 
new members in addition to 
veterans such as Hill Mallory, 
Pleasant Hughes and Scott 
Graber. Mallory, a four year 
veteran of the JMU squad, 
claimed, "The team consistency 
has gotten stronger over the 
past four years." Because the 
team consisted of only seven 
members, the men formed a 
strong team unity during their 
long hours of practicing and 

STEADY. ♦Todd Jenkins gets the 
ball rolling with a smooth stroke. 
Jenkins shot 79-81 at the Virginia 
Intercollegiate League in Hot 
Springs, Va. 



traveling to tournaments. 
Thus, even though the men 
competed individually, the en- 
couragement they received 
from their teammates helped 
them through their tourna- 
ments. 

In addition to a demanding 
practice schedule, members of 
the golf team traveled to tour- 
naments approximately every 
other weekend. During the sea- 
son, JMU hosted only one home 
tournament. The rigorous 
schedule continued through 
both semesters because golf 
was one of JMU's few two-sea- 
son sports. 

The team began the season 
with a strong fourth place fin- 
ish at the annual Washington 
and Lee Invitational. In that 
competition, Scott Graber tied 
for fourth place in individual 
competition. Pleasant Hughes 
tied for sixth place, and Hill 



Men's Golf 



Mallory and Brady O'Neill had 
strong finishes. 

Another competition in 
which the Dukes played well 
was the Black Knight Invita- 
tional in West Point, N.Y. The 
team finished second out of 
fifteen team enteries. Mallory, 
Graber and Hughes again led 
the team, along with Brady 
O'Neill and Doug McCarthy, 
who improved their season av- 
erages with strong perfor- 
mances in the event. 

In the final standings of the 
fall season, Scott Graber and 
Hill Mallory led the team with 
76.4 averages per round, fol- 
lowed by Pleasant Hughes' 76.8 
average. At the season's end, 
the members were pleased 
with their individual perfor- 
mances as well as their accom- 
plishments as a team. 

-Christine Letsky 




Left to Right: Scott Graber, Hill Malloy, Doug McCarthy, Todd Jenkins, Brady O'Neill, Kyle Leniise, 
Pleasant Hughes. 



CONCENTRATE ♦ Hill Mallory hits a mid iron 
from the first cut of rough. Mallory tied for sixth 
at the Black Knight Fall Invitational. 



II 



Men's Golf i ^3 




FALL SEASON PROVED TO BE A 
SUCCESS FOR LADY GOLFERS 



♦ "Calay's not home. She just 
left for a golf tournament in 
South Carolina." Anyone try- 
ing to reach Calay Jaynes, or 
any other member of the 
women's golf team, was accus- 
tomed to hearing these or simi- 
lar words. Jaynes, the team 
captain,and the rest of the team 
traveled to five different week- 
end tournaments this season. 
The team had only one home 
tournament in their fall sea- 
son, which was held in 
Staunton. This busy schedule 
of traveling, along with the 
many hours of practice, left 
the women's golf team with 
few free moments. 

The women were led by 
third year coach Susan 
LaMotte, who had high hopes 
for her voung team. She con- 



ceded that, "We are definitely 
young," but she noted that 
some of the underclassmen had 

already become ex- 

perienced colle- 
giate golfers in 1 991 
when the Dukes 
won the ECAC 
tournament. 
Jaynes, the only se- 
nior on the squad, 
pointed out that age 
was not the decid- 
ing factor. "We have 
a very close-knit group and it 
makes a big difference," she 
said. "There's no competition 
between the players on the 
team, we all support each 
other." 

The women consistently 
placed in upper standings of 
competitions, in fact, thev 



"There 's no 

competition 

between players 

on the team, we 

all support each 

other. " 

♦ 



placed in the top half of team 
standings in all competitions 
except one. But the highlight of 

the season was the 

team's exceptional 
finish in the ECAC 
Championships in 
Conneticut. Coach 
LaMotte had said in 
the pre-season that 
one of the team's 
goals was to repeat 
as ECAC champi- 
ons. And that they 
did. Jaynes and Heather 
Breeden finished second and 
fifth respectively, while Christy 
Power and Heidi McWilliams 
tied for fifteenth. 

The friendships and dedi- 
cation that developed on the 
team made 1992 a success. 
-Christine Letsky 




PEACEFUL* Heather Breeden and 
Calay Jaynes take a rest by the lake 
during a practice round at Yale. The 
Dukes finished first. 



BLAST* Calay Jaynes plays out of a 
bunker in warm-up. Jaynes' 
consistency inspired the team in 
tournaments throughout the season. 






i ^A- Fall Sports 



I 




TENDING ♦ Heather Breeden holds 
the pin while her competitor putts. 
Despite a pre-season shoulder injury, 
Breeden played consistently. 



ANTICIPATION ♦Heidi 
McWilliams warms up on the 
practice green. The Dukes took first 
m the ECAC championship in 1992. 



Tournaments 




mMPVBiPi 




Tar Heel Invitational 




8 1 IHI^ J 




Longwood Invitational 








Duke Invitational 




* 




JMU Invitational 






ECAC Championships 




i^ 




Highlights 






-Calay Jaynes placed second at the 




^C 




Longwood Invitational Tournament 




1^ 




in September. 




T 




-Niki Crist finished first in the JMU 




\ 




Ivitational in October. 




M 




-The Dukes finished second as a 




f ■ 




team at the Longwood Invitational 




f m 




and they won the ECAC Champion- 




.f \ 




ships; at the championships Jaynes 




Sl^. 




ihot 237(three days) for second place 
and Heather Breeden finished fifth 










with 248. 


^^^^^^ 






-The Dukes also finished 


Hi 




IjH 


fourth at the JMU 


■% 


WiHKPI 


W^ 


Invitational which was 


.^ K 




played at Staunton on 


-■^i^fW-^M '"^iOB 1 


1 


October! 0-11 th. 


mP^-W ^9 1 




PING POWER* Coach 


W^m ~'^ 1 




LaMotte and Niki Crist 


w ^ ^ 




display Crist's award for 


■i^ ••*-II ^^. ^ 


.^_ 


finishing first at the JMU 


* :■ ^mgmS^^ 


■'■ 


Invitational. The 


. ) f^tM^ 


< 


freshman shot 76-80 to 




top the field. 


^#1 (^ ^^^m'4g^^ 



Women's Golf 




First Row: Niki Crist, Heather Breeden, Kim Grahn, Heidi McWiUiams, 
Robin Campbell. Second Row: Coach Susan LaMotte, Christy Power, Calay 
Jaynes, Jessica Adams, Gina Little, Heather Betts. 



CHIPPER* Christy Power takes a 
couple minutes to work on her short 
game. Power tied for fourth at the 
Longwood Invitational in Septem- 
ber. 



Women's Golf i ^3 



Nru'imn 



ALL RIGHT ♦ Freshman Paul Schaftner strokes a 
backhand in practice. The team was extremely 
young this year, with only two seniors on the 
roster. 

EAGER ♦ John Lisack prepares to return the ball 
down the line. The tennis team played in 
competitions in both the fall and the spring. 




SLAM ♦ With a look of concentration, Brian 
Phoebus hits a backhand to his opponent. The JMU 
team played in four out-of-state tournaments this 
fall. 



i ^(5 Fall Sports 





'REPARATION* Kevin Long bounces the ball 
X'fore serving to his opponent. Much of the 
Lukes' success was due to their dedicated off- 
season training regimine. 





FROM TOP TO BOTTOM OF THE 
ROSTER, TENNIS PLAYERS CON- 
TRIBUTED TO A TEAM EFFORT 



♦ The men's tennis team fin- 
ished the fall season much im- 
proved from the previous year. 
The team was fairly young, 
consisting of one freshman, 
seven sophomores, one junior 
and two seniors. Drew 
Wittman, in his third year of 
coaching, believed that the 
team showed potential and 
gained valuable experience 
which would be useful for the 
spring season. 

The team did well in the 
majority of their key tourna- 
ments in the fall. The team com- 
peted in five tournaments, four 
of which were held out-of-state. 
At the one home competition, 
the JMU Invitational, freshman 
Matt Rowe and sophomore 
Kevin Long won the Flight One 
doubles championship, while 
sophomores John Lisack and 

WITH EASE ♦ Landon Harper 
strokes a backhand during practice. 
During the season, team members 
competed in both individual and 
doubles matches. 



Matt Gabler won the doubles 
championship in Flight Two. 
The Colonial Athletic Associa- 
tion Fall Invitational, held at 
East Carolina University, was 
considered one of the high- 
lights of the season. In singles 
competition. Matt Rowe won 
the consolation finals, while 
Jamie Samuel and Sean White 
both reached the quarter-finals. 
Matt Rowe and Kevin Long 
both made it to the finals of the 
tournament. Coach Wittman 
explained the significance of 
the CAA Fall Invitational by 
saying, "It shows that we can 
compete and do well against 
the other teams in the confer- 
ence." 

In addition to their matches 
in the fall, the team also pre- 
pared for a spring season. The 
fall season consisted of mostly 
tournament play, while the 
spring season entailed more 
dual match competition. In ad- 
dition, their schedule included 
an annual spring break trip. 

Men's Tennis 



which gave the team an oppor- 
tunity to play teams from all 
over the nation. The Dukes 
used the weight facilities and 
conditioning programs to stay 
in top shape during the off- 
season. 

Many members of the team 
felt that their experiences in 
the fall would help their spring 
performances. This was espe- 
cially true for freshman Matt 
Rowe and sophomore John 
Lisack, both in their first year 
on the JMU team. Both players 
claimed they enjoyed their first 
season and felt it would help 
their future endeavors at JMU. 

Throughout the season, the 
team was led by Jamie Samuel, 
a senior team captain. Samuel 
believed that many of the 
Dukes proved to be tough com- 
petitors who performed well. 
He also felt that, "the fall sea- 
son helped the team gain expe- 
rience and confidence." 
-Melanie Stone 




Front Row: Chad Layman, Jamie Samuel, Landon Harper, Brian Phoebus, Matt Herman. Back Row: Head Coach 
Drew Wittman, Kevin Long, Matt Gabler, Jonas Cirotas, Sean White, John Lisack, Matt Rowe, Asst. Coach Larout 



Men's Tennis 



147 



INTENSITY* Caroline Cox uses her overpower- 
ing backhand to beat her opponent with a deep, 
cross-court shot. Cox, as a sophomore, competed 
as a starter for the second year at JMU. 

40-0 ♦ Meredith Jamieson serves from the ad court 
to finish off her opponent. Jamieson, from 
Springfied, Va, was a welcome addition in 1992. 





EYE ON THE BALL* Deb DeYulia concentrates 
on following the ball to her racket's sweetspot for 
a down-the-alley winner. The Dukes were led by 
Coach Malerba in her 17th season at JMU. 



Matches 

JMU Invitational Tournament 
ITCA Team Regional Qualifier 
JMU vs. Virginia Tech 
JMU vs. West Virginia 
ITCA Final Four Team 
Championships 
ECAC Championships 
ITCA Regional Tournament 



ACE ♦Katie Piorkowski puts her all into her serve. 
Piorkowski, from Glastonbury, Connetitcut, was 
ranked 13th in New England in her age group. 



-^ Zf g Fall Sports 




I 



senii 







YOUNG TENNIS TEAM IMPROVED 
IN TOUGH SEASON 




♦ The 1992 JMU women's ten- 
nis team excelled in the 1992 
season, overcoming doubts 
about their very young team. 

"We're really 

young," com- 
mented coach 
Maria Malerba. "1 
can't remember a 
year like this when 
we did not have a 
senior in the top 

six." 

Coach Malerba 
started her seventeenth season 
very optimistic of her young 
team. "We would like to go to 
the ITA regional tournament 
at William&Mary and have a 
respectable showing, "she 
said. "We'll be the youngest 
team there." Two of JMU's top 
positions went to the newest 
members of the team, fresh- 

RIGHT BACK ATCHA' ♦Darian 
Smith rallies along the baseline. 
Smith, from Jupiter, Florida, was a 
returning starter as a sohomore. 



"I can 't remem- 
ber a year like 
this when we 
didn 't have a 

senior in the top 
six. " 

♦ 



men Meredith Jamieson and 
Katie Piorkowski. Jamieson 
was ranked tenth in the mid- 
Atlantic region and was the 

Virginia state 

doubles runner-up 
as a senior at West 
Springfield, while 
P i o k o w s k i 
wasranked thir- 
teenth in New En- 
gland." 

JMU started its 

1 992 season by host- 
ing eight teams in the JMU In- 
vitational Tournament. Com- 
peting teams included Ameri- 
can, Davidson, George Mason, 
Maryland, Penn State, Rich- 
mond, and Virginia. Although 
the Dukes did not place as a 
team, they sent a few members 
to the semi-finals. Two of JMU's 
players, Renee Bousselaire and 
Jody Craybas, could not par- 
ticipate because they were at 
the International Tennis Asso- 
ciation National Clay Court 



Women's Tennis 



Tournament. 

The Dukes also placed some 
of its players at the ECAC 
Championships in Piscataway, 
New Jersey. In singles play, 
JMU placed three of its mem- 
bers. Bousselaire earned semi- 
finalist honors, Jamieson took 
the honor of consolation round 
champion, and Piorkowski 
made it to the finals, only to be 
beaten. In the doubles cat- 
egory, the Dukes pulled out 
two honors. The team of 
Bousselaire/Craybas were 
runners-up at the finals, while 
the team of DeYulia/Smith 
were consolation round run- 
ners-up. 

JMU ended the year with a 
record of 10-8 in singles play 
and 3-5 in doubles. Coach 
Malerba expected about a .500 
year, stating that her young 
team would be a powerful force 
in 1993. 

-Joe Olson 




POISED ♦Jody Cray has finishes her return of 
service by strongly following through on her 
backhand. The Dukes had only one senior on the 
team in 1992. 



Front Row: Renee Busselaire, Caroline Cox, Katie Piorkowski, Kristy Jessen. Back Row: Deb 
DeYulia, Darian Smith, Meredith Jamieson, Jody Crayhas. 



Women's Tennis 



1^9 




MEN'S CROSS COUNTRY CON- 
CLUDED STRONG SEASON BY 
BEATING CAA OPPONENTS 




♦ The 1992 men's cross coun- 
try team trained and raced their 
way to their best season ever. 
Runners logged countless 
miles through parks, trails, and 
local streets en 
route to winning 
their first ever Co- 
lonial Athletic As- 
sociation champi- 
onship. Head coach 
Bill Walton claimed 
that "this team definitely ranks 
as the best team in jMU his- 
tory." 

The young Dukes team was 
led by senior Chris Straub, jun- 
iors Matt Holthaus, Chris 
Baker, Jeff Thompson, Phil 
Dickenson, and sophomores 
Tom Jeffrey, Dave Holliday, 
John Slessinger, Mike Marshall 
and Scott Jackson. 

Strong teamwork and lead- 
ership played an integral role 
in the team's success. During 
races, they used the "contact- 
pack running" approach, 
which involves a leader who 
sets a pace with three or four 



t 



"We fotalhj 

executed our 

game plan and it 

worked. " 



% 



teammates running with him. 
Straub, the senior captain, 
stated that the team, "consists 
of many personalities, but ev- 
eryone respects one another 
and we are close 
friends." 

This year's sea- 
son started out with 
a successful third 
place finish at the 
Spiked Shoe Invita- 
tional behind only power- 
houses Penn State and Penn- 
sylvania. Straub, Holthaus, and 
Baker led the Dukes by placing 
in the top 20 out of 1 64 runners. 
A strong showing at the 
Furman Invitational in South 
Carolina resulted in another 
impressive third place effort, 
and the first ever victory over 
the University of Virginia. The 
Dukes closed out their invita- 
tional meets by winning the 
Liberty invitational. The out- 
standing performance yielded 
five runners in the top 10, led 
by Holthaus' 25:43.8 for the 
five-mile course. 



The season culminated with 
the championship at the con- 
ference race in Willliamsburg. 
Holthaus, Straub and Marshall 
led the way to the first CAA 
championship in school history 
by finishing second, third and 
fifth, respectively. "For one of 
the first times, we totally ex- 
ecuted our game plan and it 
worked. This is what we have 
been building towards for two 
years now, and it is a great 
feeling to have accomplished 
our goal," Straub said after the 
race. 

Walton stated, "This is defi- 
nitely one of the biggest high- 
lights I've had coaching cross 
country here." Walton credited 
newly-named full-time coach 
Pat Henner with much of the 
success. "Pat has done an 
amazing job. He worked ex- 
tremely hard and motivated 
the kids into doing what they 
did. Having him as a full-time 
coach was a large factor in us 
getting here." 

-Rob Singer 




TAKING IT IN STRIDE ♦ Five JMU 
runners do strides on the Godwin 
practice field. Cross country team 
members logged many miles in 
preparation for their races. 



STAYING TOGETHER* A group of 
Duke harriers lead at the Liberty 
Invitational. "Pack-style" running 
was a key ingredient in JMU's 
winning the CAA championship. 




*» 



Fall Sports 





GuHfoyk 




ALL SMILES ♦ Chris Sfraub and 
Chris Baker smile as they warm-up. 
A proper warm-up and thorough 
stretching helped prevent injuries. 



Tournaments 
Spiked Shoe/Penn State 

Invitational 

Morven Park Invitational 

at Virginia Military Institute 

Furman Invitational 

Liberty Invitational 

CAA Championships 

Highlights 

-At the Liberty Invitational, JMU 
took first out of nine schools by 
finishing five of the top ten runners. 
-At the CAA Championships, the 
Dukes won again with four of the 
first ten runners and nine 

out of the top twenty. 
-Matt Holthaus finished 
third at the Liberty meet 
and second at the CAAs, 

while Tom Jeffrey 
finished fourth and sixth 
respectively. 
-Chris Straub finished 
third at the CAAs and Jon 
Schlesinger finished first 
in the meet against VMI. 



OFF AND RUNNING ♦ 
With the firing of the gun, 
the Dukes take off en routi 
to thier first place finish 
the Liberty Invitational. 
HolthausdOS) got third. 




EYES ON THE 
PRIZE* Paul Moye 
and Matt Holthaus 
sprint towards the 
finish line. Runners 
tried to save a little 
energy for their late 
race kick. 




Guilfoyle 




First Row: Marshall Smith, Kevin Scanlon, Chris Baker, Chris Straub, Gavin McCarty. Second Row: Jeff Thompson, 
Mike Marshall, Dave Holliday, Paul Moye, Jay Thomas, Chris Kearns, Matt Holthaus, Jon Schlesinger. Third Row: 
Aaron Hatfield, Scott Jackson, Rob Hoadley, Tom Jeffrey, Phil Dicken^m. 



Men's Cross Country ^ 3 ^ 



A HELPING HAND* )uli Speights helps Amv 
Taylor avoid cramps by stretching before 
practice. The two co-captains led the Dukes to 
a second place finish at the CAA champion- 
ship. 

THREE'S COMPANY* Liz Heany, Melissa 
Herbert, and Melissa Freda embark on a long 
run. Women's cross country team members 
gained endurance and strength through their 
high mileage workouts. 




UinlU'UIr 


uA 


(*^ 




CAN'T TOUCH THIS* 
Senior Juli Speights 
gets mentally prepared 


k ' 


. JP 




Ik - 


N^^afa 


ilk 


before her race. 


^ \k 


~ m 


n 


Speights helped lead 


9 


^ 


p 


the young JMU team 


M 


4qu J 


|r 


to one of their most 


m 


'Htty 




successful seasons 


,.-/." 


^■f^v 




ever. 


r 


^- 




Highlights 
-JuU Speights coming 


r , 




1 


off an All-American 
track season in the 


' 




u . 


spring led the cross 


Ciitlfoyle 




-The Dukes finished second in the 

CAA Championships, with Amy 

Taylor, Speights and Melissa Freda 

all finishing in the top ten. 

-The program began organizing for 

the future by adding six freshmen to 

the team in 1992. 

MEETS 

Spiked Shoe Invitational 

Georgetown Invitational 

Furman Invitational 

Liberty Invitational 

CAA Championships 

ECAC Championships 

NCAA Championships 



GET LOOSE* Liz Heaney prepares 
for a run at Purcell Park. Heaney 
finished with a time of 19:42 at the 
CAA Championships. 



i52 Fall Sports 





■=77=" '^Tr' 




FTnl 




i 



T^-; ,,i^(>; *•'■"■- . 







//foi/li' 



TAKING IT IN STRIDE ♦Melissa 
Adams and Bridgette Fudella do 
strides after practice. The strides 
helped build leg strength and speed. 



CROSS COUNTRY RUNNERS PROVED- 
TO BE NATURAL LEADERS 



♦ Long, grueling practices and 
intense races symbolized the 
1992 women's cross country 
season. Many miles spent run- 
ning through the mountains 
and many hours on the track 
led the Dukes to a successful 
season capped off by a second 
place finish at the Colonial Ath- 
letic Association champion- 
ships. 

The team was led by senior 
co-captains Amy Taylor and 
Juli Speights and Coach Gwen 
Harris. Speights, a fifth-year 
senior, returned this year after 
receiving All- American honors 
last year in outdoor track. 
Other than the two co-captains, 
the profile of the team was that 
of a young Duke's squad. 
Other consistent runners in- 
cluded Juniors Melissa Freda, 
Stephanie Herbert, and Liz 
Heaney, sophomore Theresa 
Prebish, and Freshmen Mona 
Gupta and Mehssa Adams. 

The team attributed much 
of their success to their work 



ethic. Speights commented, 
"The work ethic of the team 
was 100% better than last year. 
The attitude was more posi- 
tive, and it was refreshing to 
have freshman ex- 
cited about running 
and running hard." 
Taylor added, "Our 
training has 

changed this year 
and has helped a 
lot." 

The season was 
marked by a vast 
improvement over 
last year. The Dukes placed in 
the top four in every meet this 
season against the stiffest 
competion they had ever faced. 
They raced well against the 
highly touted Atlantic Coast 
Conference schools. They did 
this despite a foot injury that 
hobbled Herbert, a consistently 
high placer, for much of the 
season. 

The team started the season 
with a fourth place finish at the 



"Our training 
has changed 

this year and 

has helped a 

lot." 

♦ 



Lady Lion meet at Penn State. 
At the Furman Invitational in 
South Carolina, the Dukes 
placed an impressive third out 
of twenty-two schools with 
Speights, Taylor, 
and Freda all plac- 
ing in the top ten. 
The final invita- 
tional of the season, 
at Liberty, saw the 
Dukes taking first. 
Speights, Taylor, 
and Freda placed 
first, second, and 
fourth respectively 
in the Liberty Invitational. 

At the conference champi- 
onships, the Dukes placed sec- 
ond only to perennial power 
William and Mary. Taylor, 
who placed second, stated, 
"William and Mary was very 
concious that we could have 
beaten them. This was as well 
as we have ever run at CAA's 
and with a much younger 



team. 



-Rob Singer 



Women's Cross Country 




Front Row: Stephanie Herbert, Liz Heany, Melissa Freda, Theresa Prebish. 
Back Row: Jcianne Ware, Bridgette Fudella, Melissa Adams, Mona Gupta, 
Amy Taylor, Juli Speights, Jill Baumgander, Cindy Price. 



LEADING THE PACK* Three members of the 
team lead the Dukes' warm-up before the CAA 
championship race. The race, in Williamsburg, 
determined the conference champion. 



Women's Cross Country \ Z^ ^ 



Volleyball 




CouiU'iii rif Sfvrh Mfiliii RfMnin^ 



Front Row: Debbi Prince, Zee Anastas, Alison Harris, Sean Barnak, Mary Harrington. Second Row: 
Susan Martin, Marcey Docid, Christine Amick. Third Row: Mehssa Skasko, Wendi Miller, Patti Bucaria 
Amber Jaunnibenis, Jennifer Sternberg. 



SCORES 




JMU OPP 1 


3 MarshaU 





2 Ohio 


3 


Ohio State 


3 


3 West Virginia 


2 


3 Boston College 





Virginia Tech 


3 


1 Rutgers 


3 


3 Liberty 


2 


3 Virginia Commonwealtl- 


1 


3 Eastern Kentucky 


2 


3 North Carolina State 


2 


1 Montana State 


3 


2 Radford 


3 


2 Virginia 


3 


1 Virginia Tech 


3 


Maryland 


3 


3 Georgetown 


2 


1 Villanova 


3 


3 Delaware 


2 


3 American 





George Mason 


3 


2 George Washington 


3 


William and Mary 


3 


2 Virginia 


3 


3 UNC Wilmington 


1 


3 East Carolina 





3 Liberty 





3 Loyola, MD 





3 Hartford 


1 


3 Colgate 





3 Dartmouth 





2 CornelJ 


3 


3 Towson State 


1 




UP & OVER ♦ Zoe Anastas propels 
the volleyball over the net. The 
women competed in three major 
tournaments in addition to their 
regular season matches. 



TEAMWORK ♦ Sophomore 
Christine Amick and senior Patti 
Bucoria watch a shot go wide. The 
Dukes lost this match after winning 
the first two games. 



^3^ Fall Sports 








ROLLER COASTER SEASON DID 

NOT STOP VOLLEYBALL TEAM 

FROM WORKING HARD 



ni 



d. 



♦ The 1992 women's volley- 
ball team made a name for 
themselves in a sport domi- 
nated by larger schools. Play- 
ing against schools such as 
Georgetown, West Virginia, 
and North Carolina State, 
proved to be a challenge to the 
young JMU team every step of 
the way. 

The lady Dukes started their 
year with a road trip to 
Marshall, West Virginia. JMU 
swept all three games in the 
match 15-11, 15-3, 15-11, mak- 
ing their record 1-0. "\ thought 
we played very well," com- 
mented senior Wendi Miller. 
"\ was expecting a tough match 
and 1 think we got it." But from 
then on, 1992 proved to be an 
up and down season for JMU. 

ITS FOR YOU ♦Junior Amber 
Jaunrubenis sets for senior Wendi 
Miller. Members of the team agreed 
that teamwork and unity were 
essential components of success. 



Much of the season was an 
effort by the Dukes to play con- 
sistently. From September 3rd 
to October 9th the team was 
very streaky, losing two, win- 
ning two, giving two, taking 
four and then falling to their 
opponents in five straight 
matches. 

JMU proved to be a strong 
contender in several tourna- 
ments, though. In the Eastern 
Kentucky Invitational, JMU 
won their first two matches 
against Eastern Kentucky and 
North Carolina State, sending 
them into the finals against 
Montana State. JMU and Mon- 
tana state traded game wins, 
but at the end, the Dukes had 
to settle for a second place fin- 
ish. In the Cornell Invitational, 
JMU took victories against 
Hartford, Dartmouth, and 
Colgate, winning three out of 
the four matches played. The 
Dukes' only loss was to Ivy 



league powerhouse, Cornell. 
JMU took the first two games, 
sliding by Cornell 16-14,16-14, 
but the tournament hosts ral- 
lied and won the next three, 
beating the Dukes 15-5, 15-8, 
15-10. 

JMU also proved to be a con- 
tender in the CAA. The Dukes 
racked up wins against CAA 
rivals American, East Carolina, 
and North Carolina 
Wilmington. JMU's two CAA 
losses were at the hands of 
George Mason and 

William&Mary, but those two 
losses were early in the season. 

After a rough start, JMU ral- 
lied in its last half of the season. 
At one time, JMU dominated 
by winning seven of eight 
matches. "We're at a peak right 
now," said senior Patti 
Bucaria," We just gotta hold it." 
-Joe Olson 





SUPER SPIKE ♦ Senior 
Wendi Miller goes up 
for a kill against 
Liberty. The Dukes 
won the match, three 
games to two. 



BACK AT YOU* 
Freshmen Debbi Prince 
and Susan Martin 
block a George 
Washington spike. 



VoUeybaO i55 



rVE GOT IT ♦ Sherry Mohr 
concentrates on the ball as she 
prepares to chase after it. The team 
was led by Head Coach Christy 
Morgan in her second year at JMU. 




SPEEDY^ With speed 
and agilitv, freshman 
Heather Hoehein beats 
a Duke player to the 
ball. The young team 
concentrated on 
working together to 
build a unified 
atmosphere. 

CLOSE CALL ♦ Junior 
Carol Hilliard tries to 
control the ball before 
it goes out of bounds. 
Hilliard was one of 
four juniors on the 
young team. 







SCORES 




JMU 

1 Duke 


OPP 

4 


3 


Maine 


1 


5 




Georgetown 

Virginia 

Richmond 



2 
2 





New Hampshire 


2 


1 


Northeastern 


4 


1 

1 


Springfield 
American 






1 


North Carolina 


2 




2 


Maryland 

William and Mary 

Radford 


4 
1 






Davidson 


1 


2 


Virginia Commonwealth 3 | 





Old Dominion 


7 


2 


Virginia 


3 


2 


Richmond 





1 


Old Dominion 


10 




IN CONTROL ♦ Nancy Yago maneuvers the ball 
past an opposing Duke player. Yago was one of 
the two seniors on the team. 



inaii«iv( 



156 



Fall Sports 




FOOTWORK ♦ Tri-captain Tricia Kenney 
maneuvers the ball as she heads down-field 
toward her opponent's goal. The Dukes were 
ranked 15th in the preseason. 




Irnni 





FIELD HOCKEY SQUAD 

GAINED EXPERIENCE BY 

FACING STIFF COMPETITION 



♦ JMU's Field Hockey team 
rebuilt around a young nucleus 
in 1992. They wanted to chal- 
lenge major teams, and they 
wanted to earn 
some respect. 

In the pre-season 
polls, JMU was 
ranked 15th in the 
nation. It was the 
first time JMU had 
ever even been 
ranked in a pre-sea- 
son poll. The fall 
schedule was filled with other 
ranked teams such as two time 
defending NCAA champion 
ODU and fourth ranked UNC, 
12th ranked Ohio State and 
14th ranked Duke. Coach 
Christy Morgan said that in 
practice, the team focused on 
fundamentals and team unity. 
She also added, "Our goal is to 

READY FOR ACTION ♦ EUeen 
Arnaldo prepares for an offensive 
attack. This summer, Arnaldo 
participated in the USA Field 
Hockey Development camps. 



"We want to 
focus on us, 
on being the 
best we can 

be." 
♦ 



play well. We want to focus on 
us, on being the best we can 
be." 

The nucleus of Leslie Nason, 
Tricia Kenney, 
Megan Kelly, Kelly 
Bloomer, and 
Eileen Arnaldo led 
the Dukes as they 
beat strong teams 
like Maine Univer- 
sity and 
Georgetown, and 
scared sixth-ranked 
UNC, just falling to the Tar 
Heels 2-1. 

Coach Christy Morgan 
thought the UNC game 
showed that the team had 
made major progress. "They 
were number six and we were 
in it every second," she said. 
The game was a big one for 
Danyle Heffernan as well. She 
scored the lone goal off of UNC, 
her first of the season. "It was 
so exciting," Heffernan said. 
"When I heard it I went 'Wow!' 
It was an incredible feeling 

Field Hockey 



when the crowd went wild! 
But the goal was a team effort. 
I was just in the right place at 
the right time." 

JMU held their own against 
other ranked teams, playing 
close games against top 20 pro- 
grams such as UV A, Maryland, 
New Hampshire, and North- 
eastern. They even played 
tough against first ranked 
ODU, faUing 7-0, but scrapping 
the whole game on a cold rainy 
November day. 

The Dukes started the first 
round of the CAA champion- 
ships in style, beating the Rich- 
mond Spiders 2-0. In the sec- 
ond round, however, the 
Dukes were overpowered by 
ODU and thus ended their 
post-season play. 

The Dukes had played 
ranked teams tough, and were 
in high-impact form by late 
season. They had taken a re- 
building year and squeezed 
everything out of it. 

-Vasha Hunt 




First Row: Jen Ruggiero, Carol Milliard, Eileen Arnaldo, Katherine Clark, Caryn Habay, Sherry Mohr, Stephanie 
Slewsome. Second Row: Gwen Stolzfus, Danyle Heffernan, Jennifer Kuk, Megan Kelly, Coach Christy Morgan, Shell) 
Behrens, Kelley Bloomer, Nancy Yago, Tricia Kinnev, Kate Bingay. Third Row: Dianne York, Heather Colbert, Pam 
Stewart, Heather Almborg, Amy Tice, Heather Hoehlein, Leslie Nason, Sherry Squaires, Kari Allen, Renee Ranere. 



Field Hockey i3Z 



SUPPORTIVE ♦ Meg Gugliemo and 
trainer Shandra McKay carry an 
injured Suzie Pizzurro from the field. 
Trainers received academic credit for 
their efforts. 



WRAP IT UP ♦ Trainer 
Susan Nipps ices and 
wraps Elvin Brov\Ti's 
arm. Football trainers 
and managers put in 
up to five hours a dav 
at Bridgeforth Stadium 
during the football 
season. 




CHEERFUL* Junior Dianne York THIRST QUENCHER ♦Junior 

smiles as she watches a field hockey Eizabeth Gurney stands by to take 
game. Managers went to all games. care of the needs of the volleyball 

players. 



\ ^O Sports Feature 






LJ} 





MANAGERS AND TRAINERS 

WERE AN INTEGRAL PART OF 

JMU ATHLETICS 



♦ Almost every varsity sport 
at ]MU had two groups of stu- 
dents who, without the glory, 
aided their teams throughout 
the seasons. These people were 
the trainers and managers. 
They had distinctly different 
jobs to perform, but both were 
essential for the smooth opera- 
tion of the team. JMU's man- 
agers and trainers were a 
unique kind of people and their 
jobs were clearly not for every- 
one. 

Managers found themselves 
spending a great deal of time 
with their teams, such as foot- 
ball managers, who averaged 
five hours a day in Bridgeforth 
Stadium. With such a large 
time commitment involved, 
one might wonder what moti- 
vated the managers. Kelly 
Stefanko, a junior football man- 
ager claimed she decided to 
manage because, "As a fresh- 




man, it was a way to get in- 
volved and meet people." In 
addition to the benefits of meet- 
ing people and being closely 
involved with JMU athletics, 
the managers also earned a per 
semester wage (depending on 
the sport), and were allowed to 
register for classes early. Many 
managers felt that they were 
sports fans who became very 
close to the athletes while earn- 
ing some money for their ef- 
forts at the same time. 

As for the trainers, their rea- 
sons for getting involved with 
athletics were slightly differ- 
ent. The athletic training pro- 
gram included approximately 
thirty five trainers each semes- 
ter. Being an athletic trainer for 
one of the JMU teams was a 
degree requirement for the 
Athletic Training Program. But 
most of JMU's trainers were 
once athletes themselves and 



WATER BREAK ♦ 
Suzana Earner balances 
cups of Gatorade as 
football player Mike 
WoUever looks on. 
Managers were paid a 
stipend sum each 
semester for their 
efforts. 



they enjoyed keeping up with 
sports. When asked why she 
got into athletic training, Sandy 
Lutz explained her interest by 
saying, "I was an athlete in high 
school and was injured so 1 
spent a great deal of time in 
sports medicine clinics where I 
gained my interest." The pro- 
gram allowed for hands on 
experience in dealing with in- 
juries, but working closely with 
the athletes and supporting the 
various teams were also ben- 
efits of the job. 

Each time a JMU team went 
into action, so did a group of 
dedicated supporters. And the 
smooth-running athletic pro- 
grams were a testimony, not 
only to the players and coaches, 
but also to the managers and 
trainers who formed the back- 
bone of most teams. 
-Joe Russo 



Managers and Trainers I ^^ 



cL 




^^ 




"- ATHLETES WORKED ON THEIR 
STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE DURING 
AND AFTER THEIR SEASONS 



What helped the runner's 
legs get stronger, the pitcher's 
arm last longer in a game, and 
gave the swimmer better en- 
durance? It was one of the 
prominent parts of 
thehfestyleofJMU 
athletes. Weight 
training helped ath- 
letes in all sports 
excel within their 
program and 

against the compe- 
tition. 

Weight training was an im- 
portant part of every team at 
JMU. From football to lacrosse, 
every team was assigned a cer- 
tain time to go to Godwin 
weight training room for their 
workout routines. "From three 
to four, we work on the weights 
with our designed programs, 
then from four to five, we have 
our conditioning activities," 
commented baseball player 



"Even/tune I use 

the training 

center, my 

performance 

improves. " 



Jerry Burton. 

Ron Stefancin and Sherry 
Summers were the head train- 
ers at the Godwin gym. To- 
gether they designed workout 
programs designed 
to help each indi- 
vidual excel in his 
or her sport. Senior 
Stu Strange stated 
that, "Everytime I 
use the training cen- 
ter, my perfor- 
mance improves." 
Even within the same sport, 
each program was totally dif- 
ferent. A high-jumper and a 
discus thrower would not have 
the same weight program, even 
though they are on the same 
team. Each athlete's workout 
was focused on building 
strength and stamina where 
most needed. 

The athletic trainers also 
worked with athletes who had 



injuries and needed special at- 
tention to certain muscle 
groups. This helped the injured 
athlete recover more quickly 
and with the reassurance that 
someone with special training 
was there to help. 

For every team at JMU, there 
was a staff of athletic trainers 
ready to help. The combina- 
tion of good weight training 
facilities, a capable staff and 
the personal motivation of the 
athletes created a visible dif- 
ference in most teams. Other- 
wise, our track team would 
have been a little bit slower, 
our wrestling team a little less 
strong , and our women's vol- 
leyball team, a little less pow- 
erful. -Joe Olson 

LIFTING ♦ Baseball catcher Jerry 
Burton looks ahead as he does some 
upright rows. Baseball players had 
to lift during the winter months to 
prepare for their season that began 
in February. 




WORK IT* Dancer Patty Kim 
concentrates on her arm curls. In 
addition to their practices, members 
of the dance squad lifted weights 
and attended aerobic classes. 



GOOD MEDICINE* Stephanie 
Herbert passes a medicine ball to her 
teammate Theresa Prebish. Team 
members often worked out in pairs 
so they could encourage each other. 



f/o/kl 



IRON MAN ♦ Track runner Matt 
Holthaus bench presses during his 
workout. Members of the track team 
lifted weights for leg strength and 
all-over body fitness. 




160 



Sports Feature 



BACK PRESS ♦ Lacrosse player Meg Cortezi lifts 
the bar as Karlene Lydic spots. As a freshman 
Cortezi quickly learned the dedication it took to be 
a IMU athlete. 




FAST TRACK ♦ Track 
and cross country 
runner Juli Speights 
strengthens her legs on 
a weight machine. 
Speights' rigorous 
training schedule 
helped her become the 
only JMU female 
runner to receive ail- 
American honors. 



ON YOUR GUARD ♦ Offensive 
guard Scott McGiney watches in the 
mirror as he lifts weights to 
strengthen his arms. Football players 
followed a strict off-season training 
program. 



Weight Training | O I 






A^ 



lj/ 



DUKES CONTINUE TO 

SETTHE STANDARD IN 

THE CAA 



TIP4 In a practice at the Convo, Jeff Chambers 
follows up a missed shot with an easy tip. 
Chambers led the Dukes on the boards for the 
second year in a row. 



J 



♦ The Dukes of JMU began 
the 1992-93 season with re- 
newed hopes of reaching the 
NCAA tournament. A 35-7 
conference record in the three 
previous seasons had resulted 
in three regular season titles, 
but victory had proven elusive 
in each CAA tournament. 
Without an automatic invita- 
tion to the final 64, the Dukes 
had pinned their hopes on an 
equally elusive at-large bid. 
"We've beat some tough teams 
in the past, which is what you 
have to do to get an at large 
bid," said Clayton Ritter, "but 
it hasn't happened the last 
couple of years, so there is a lot 
more emphasis on the confer- 
ence tournament." So the new 
season began, and the Dukes 
knew what they had to do — 
continue to play tough against 
out-of-conference teams, keep 
beating CAA opponents and, 
above all, win the Colonial 



ON THE MOVE* 
Sophomore Kent 
Culuko drives past his 
opponent from 
Furman. Culuko had 
19 points in the season 
opener. 



Tournament. 

In his fifth year at JMU, 
Coach "Lefty" Driesell had all 
of the ingredients for a memo- 
rable season. He had five re- 
turning double-figure scorers 
(including four experienced 
seniors), a deep bench, a reju- 
venated coaching staff, and 
thousands of dedicated fans. 
Jeff Chambers, Bryan Edwards, 
Paul Carter, William Davis and 
Kent Culuko promised to pro- 
vide plenty of offense in 1992- 
93. JMU was alsoone of the first 
schools to grab headlines when 
it was announced that local 
hero and NBA star Ralph 
Sampson would be joining the 
program as an assistant coach. 
And there were editorials in all 
the university publications 
pleading for a rebirth of the 
Electric Zoo. As the season be- 
gan, Madison fans had high 
expectations for their experi- 
enced team. 



Senior center Jeff Chambers 
fought off an early season fin- 
ger injury to lead the Dukes in 
several categories. "My scor- 
ing is down and that hurts," 
said Chambers, "but when 
you're not scoring, you have to 
do other things; playing de- 
fense and passing the ball." He 
led the team in rebounds, play- 
ing time, blocked shots and, 
strangely for a center, assists. 
He was also among the team 
leaders in steals and shooting 
percentage, hitting over 56% 
from the floor. 

Senior Bryan Edwards was 
the Dukes' floor leader, and 
the point guard averaged about 
15 points and 3 assists per 
game. He also led the team in 
steals, and shot over 40% from 
three- point range. He led with 
26 points in JMU's upset of 
19th ranked California. 





■'^n^ii.n 



^ S2. ^i"'^"" Sports 







abve 
leleasf 
kifti 




STEADY* Paul Carter looks for an 
open man as he avoids the defense. 
Carter averaged about 11 points per 
game in his senior year. 



RISING ♦ Bryan Edwards leaps 
above the American defense and 
releases a long finger roll. Edwards 
led the Dukes with 15 points against 
American. 



SHOOTING STAR* William Davis 
breaks out his baseline move in a 
preseason game. Davis provided a 
crucial spark for the Dukes through- 
out the season. 



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Giiilfo\/ti- 




FOCUSED ♦Clayton Ritter shoots a 
short jumper against Richmond. 
Ritter made all four of his shots from 
the floor against the Spiders. 



Men's Basketball 



163 



SOARING ♦ Brvan Edwards defends a shot by 
Tra\'is Wells in practice. The Dukes practiced the 
tough man to man defense, which Coach Driese 
said would win games. 




Cuiltmil. 

CHAMP ♦Channing McGuffin 
concentrates on his free throw 
attempt. McGuffin joined the Dukes 
as a walk-on in 1990 and became a 
reserve point guard. 



WITH AUTHORITY* Freshman forward Kareem 
Robinson pulls down a rebound between William 
Davis and Michael Venson. Against Maryland- 
Eastern Shore, Robinson tied Paul Carter with 8 
team- leading rebounds. JMU beat its opponents 
throughout the season by 60 rebounds. 



SURE-HANDED* Darren McLinton 
triggers the offense against Auburn. 
McLinton is the son of former 
Washington Redskin Harold 
McLinton, and his brother Kevin 
plays basketball at the University of 
Maryland. 



^ /^ A Winter Sports 



REACHING ♦ Junior Michael 
/enson finishes his drive with a 
ayup against Auburn. Venson led 
he team with nine rebounds against 
'"as well. 






DUKES CONTINUE TO 

SETTHE STANDARD IN 

THE CAA 



JMU fans came to expect 
stutter-step drives, clutch fade- 
away threes,and steady ball- 
handling from Edwards, who 
always seemed to deliver. 

Paul Carter was perha ps the 
most steady player on the 
squad. He scored (flppg), re- 
bounded (7rpg), drew some of 
the toughest defensive assign- 
ments, played over 30 minutes 
per game and did it all consis- 
tently throughout the season. 
Carter and Chambers com- 
bined for about 37% of JMU's 
assists, a testimony to the big 
men's versatility and court 
sense. Leading the team in of- 
fensive rebounds. Carter got a 
lot of second chance points 
which also helped him shoot 
58% during the regular season. 

A holdout from Driesell's 
initial recruiting class, William 
Davis finished a career of ups 
and downs on a high note. As 
CAA Rookie of the Year in the 
1988-89 season, Davis had led 
the Dukes in scoring and he 
returned to that leadership role 
in his final year. Although he 
most often came off of the 



bench, the 6-5 forward was the 
Dukes' spark. "Every minute I 
get, I just try to make it count," 
commented Davis. "I try to be 
the best team player I can be." 
Along with his patented 
Michael Jordan-like baseline 
moves, Davis contributed from 
beyond the three-point stripe 
in the 1992-93 season, leading 
the team with better than 507o 
proficiency. 

Moving into the starting 
lineup in his junior year was 
Clayton Ritter. He came into 
his own as a collegiate player 
early in the season, leading the 
team with 20 points in an im- 
pressive 89-80 victory over 
Auburn on December 5th. 
Ritter more than tripled his 
scoring average from last sea- 
son, led the team with an as- 
tounding 63%i shooting from 
the floor, and was second in 
blocked shots. "I'd been doing 
it in practice for two years," 
said Ritter, "I just needed the 
opportunity to do it in the 
game." 

Kent Culuko, CAA Rookie 
of the Year for the 1991-92 sea- 

Men's Basketball 



son, continued his solid play 
as a sophomore. He helped get 
the season rolling by leading 
the team in scoring in two of 
the first three games, and he 
averaged over 13 points per 
game from then on. Culuko, 
despite facing tough defenses 
after his CAA-record 80 three- 
pointers last season, went on 
to claim the JMU career record. 
Just two thirds of the way 
through his sophomore year, 
he passed the previous three- 
point mark of 122. More im- 
portantly, though, he started 
most games in 1 992-93 and con- 
tributed to the program as a 
maturing collegiate player. 

Freshman Darren McLinton 
arrived at JMU to take over 
back-up duties at point guard. 
He played about 12 minutes 
per game, usually giving 
Edwards a rest, and contrib- 
uted capably in all categories. 
As the season progressed, 
McLinton proved his ability to 
score on the collegiate level as 
he led the team with 11 points 
in a game against East Caro- 
lina. "It was a highlight for me 




Front Row: Chase Hale, Travis Wells, Kent Culuko, William Davis, Jeff Chambers, Tiiul dirlcr, Brvan 
Edwards, Channing McGuffin, David Quinn. Second Row: "Lefty" Driesell, Chuck Driesell, Darren 
McLinton, Clayton Ritter, Kareem Robinson, Jon Hunter, Vladimir Cuk, David Foskuhl, Louis Rowe, 
Michael Venson, Ralph Sampson, Bart Bellairs. 



Men's Basketball 



165 




BOVE A 



DUKES CONTINUE TO 

SETTHE STANDARD IN 

THE CAA 



because coach had the confi- 
dence to leave me in there," 
said McLinton, who looked for- 
ward to a promising career at 
JMU. 

Junior Michael Venson and 
freshman Kareem Robinson 
also saw significant playing 
time. Both players provided a 
spark off of the bench at vari- 
ous times throughout the sea- 
son. Venson had 15 points, 5 
rebounds and 4 assists in a cru- 
cial game against Richmond, 
and tied Culuko with a game- 
high 20 points against Morgan 
State. Robinson's propensity 
for powerful dunks helped 
make him the second most pro- 
ficient shooter on the team and 
an exciting addition to the 
squad. 

Channing McGuffin and 
Travis Wells added depth to 
the backcourt as David Foskuhl 
and Vladimir Cuk did in the 
frontcourt. Freshman Tony Jor- 
dan, a contender for quarter- 
back on the 1 993 football squad, 
joined the team half way 
through the season. 

The Dukes opened with 
tliree victories, the second com- 
ing against a tough Auburn 
team. Averaging 95 points in 
these games, it was clear that 



VICTORIOUS ♦The 
Dukes celebrate during 
the waning moments of 
another blowout at the 
Convo. The Dukes 
were 13-1 at home 
during the regular 
season. 



JMU had the expected offen- 
sive punch. A disappointing 
and sloppy loss to LaSalle on 
national television, followed by 
a tough overtime loss at Penn 
State made it clear that the sea- 
son would not be a cake-walk, 
though. "In the games we lose, 
we have poor offensive con- 
trol," noted Chambers. 

The Dukes rebounded with 
three more victories including 
two of their niost impressive; 
they dumped Oregon State by 
fourteen and beat 19th ranked 
California by fifteen. Before 
starting conference play, JMU 
traded games, losing to 7th 
ranked Seton Hall, beating 
Rutgers and then giving away 
a rare and disappointing home 
game to George Washington. 
"We've done well," com- 
mented Ritter. "We've beat 
some teams nobody thought 
we could, but we've also lost to 
some we should have beat." 
Nonetheless, the Dukes were 
7-4 and were ready for their 
CAA opponents. 

JMU opened conference 
play with more offensive 
power, scoring 90 or more 
points in the first five games. 
They won seven straight and 
then manhandled their last out- 



of-conference competitor Mor- 
gan State, 110-73. At 15-4, JMU 
was running away with the 
CAA and looking good for 
post-season play, but they had 
some tough road trips in front 
of them. Their North Carolina 
trip resulted in two conference 
losses to East Carolina and 
UNC-Wilmington, which they 
followed a week later with a 
loss to Old Dominion. At 16-7, 
8-3 in the conference, the Dukes 
were then chasing Richmond. 
JMU responded by travelling 
to the Robins Center in Rich- 
mond and completing their 
first sweep of the Spiders in a 
decade. Two remaining home 
games took the Dukes to 11-3, 
and they had held on for their 
fourth straight regular season 
conference title. 

Unfortunately, the 1992-93 
season began to look like the 
previous three when it was 
tournament time. The Dukes 
made it past George Mason and 
American only to lose in the 
championship to East Carolina, 
the seventh seed . For the fourth 
year in a row, the Dukes and 
their fans had to settle for an 
NIT appearance after a strong 
season. 

-John Rogers 




^ /^ ^ Winter Sports 







:OUNT IT* Junior Clayton Ritter 
.hoots a jumper over his American 
)pponent. Ritter shot over 60% from 
he floor tor the season. 



REVERSE* Senior Paul Carter takes 
home a reverse dunk. Carter viias 
perhaps the most consistent 
performer for the Dukes. 



SWAT* Soaring along the baseline, Jeff Chambers 
goes after another block. Chambers finished 
second among all-time JMU shot blockers. 



EYE ON THE BALL* Kent Culuko 
drives past the American defense for 
two of his first half points. Culuko 
finished the game with 13 points. 




FLEET FOOTED * Senior guard Bryan Edwards 
stays with his man in an away game at Richmond. 
With such defense, Edwards led the team in steals 
in the 1992-93 season. 



SKYING * Freshman forward Kareem Robinson 
goes high with a jump hook as his fans look on. 
Robinson's shot blocking and powerful dunks 
made him one of the Zoo's favorites. 



Men's Basketball 



ENCOURAGEMENT* Coach 
Sampson talks to guard Kent Culiiko 
while he watches the Dukes warm 
up. Sampson was the NBAs first 
draft pick in 1983. 




Cuiltoi/U' 



LOOKING ON ♦ Ralph Sampson 
watches the American game. 
Sampson was the national collegiate 
plaver of the vear three times at the 
University of Virginia. 



^#>^■yfe*';M^:^}Jivi 



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^ ^Q Sports Feature 






RALPH SAMPSON JOINS 

THE MADISON BASKETBALL 

PROGRAM 



ci— i=: 



♦ The JMU community grew 
just before the 1992-93 season, 
in fact it increased by seven 
feet, four inches. The univer- 
sity made room for a local leg- 
end as Ralph Sampson joined 
coach "Lefty" Driesell's coach- 
ing staff. The mutually satisfy- 
ing arrangement gave 
Sampson a chance to make his 
debut in coaching, while the 
JMU basketball program had 
another name to lend it legiti- 
macy. 

"I've always wanted to 
coach," Sampson told the 
Washington Post. "\ think I can 
do it well. I teach the game a 
little bit differently because I'm 
fresh out of the NBA." And the 
JMU players did not disagree. 



"He's a great medium," said 
junior forward Clayton Ritter. 
"He knows both sides, playing 
and coaching." Ritter was also 
impressed with Sampson's 
"approachability." 

Senior center Jeff Chambers 
agreed that coach Sampson 
was a good addition to the staff. 
"He's been there on the college 
level as well as pro and it's easy 
for him to relate to us as play- 
ers," said Chambers. "He's easy 
to talk to. He's a good guy." 

Sampson's career was either 
side-tracked or ended in 1992 
by continuing knee trouble 
and, after short stays with the 
Washington Bullets and in 
Spain, he returned to 
Harrisonburg, where he was 



born and raised. Then Driesell 
recruited him, this time suc- 
cessfully (Driesell had make 
an intense effort to get Sampson 
to attend the University of 
Maryland, where he was coach- 
ing). Sampson, already a leg- 
endary player, proved at JMU 
to be the best thing a coach 
could be — a true student of the 
game. 

Depending partly on 
Sampson's knees, there was a 
good possibility that Driesell 
would be searching for another 
assistant in 1993, but, for at 
least one season, the univer- 
sity was honored by the pres- 
ence of a classy and gentle gi- 
ant. 

-John Rogers 




AI'PROVAL* Coaches Sampson and Driesell 
watch their basketball team with pleasure. Driesell 
was unsuccessful in recruiting Sampson to 
Maryland, but he had better luck at JMU. 



PUMPED* Fans of JMU and Ralph Sampson 
cheer on the Dukes at the Convo. Sampson was 
greeted much more warmly by the Electric Zoo in 
1992 than in 1982, when he played for Virginia. 



Sampson ^ /^ O 





irl 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL TEAM 

OVERCAME INEXPERIENCE AND 

INJURIES 







♦ The James Madison Univer- 
sity women's basketball team 
celebrated its 70th year at JMU 
by overcoming several injures 
and working with an extremely 
young team. The Lady Dukes 
consisted of only three upper- 
classmen, with six sophomores 
and three freshmen to fill the 
rest of the roster. "Since we 
don't have experienced play- 
ers, we'll give as many young 
players as we can a building 
experience for the future," com- 
mented llth-year head coach 
Shelia Moorman. With inex- 
perience at such a high level, 
fall practices became an essen- 
tial part of the 1992-93 season. 
Each player refined her skills, 
both as an individual and as a 
team member. 

The Dukes brought back 
three starters from the previ- 
ous year, sophomores Krissy 
Heinbaugh, Christina Lee, and 
KaraRatcHff. Heinbaugh, CAA 
Rookie of the Year in 1991-92, 
one of the most promising re- 

OPEN* Mary Eileen 
Algeo looks for Kara 
Ratliff in the lane. 
Algeo stepped in and 
performed solidly in 
the second half of the 
season when the team 
was plagued by 
injuries. 



turning players, developed 
mononucleosis, and was lim- 
ited to only five games. Sopho- 
more Jackie Freeman and 
Freshman Sarah Schreib, also 
were sidelined due to illness or 
injury. Throughout the sea- 
son, JMU had to play with less 
than a full team, requiring the 
healthy players to step up and 
carry the team. "Injuries were 
hard to deal with at first," said 
sophomore Christina Lee. "We 
were down to eight players, 
but we dealt with it, and I feel 
eight is enough to get the job 
done." 

The Dukes started the year 
by winning their eighth 
straight season opener, this one 
against Morgan State. From 
the very beginning, JMU domi- 
nated the court, outscoring 
MSU 22-4 in the first eight min- 
utes of play. The Bears tried to 
come back in the first half, but 
only managed to score sixteen 
more points for a half time score 
of 39-20. In the second half. 




Ginlfpi/lt' 



IN CONTROL* Gail Shelly works 
the perimeter in a home game. Shelly 
was one of JMU's key players on the 
court. 



JMU again took control of the 
floor. In the last eight minutes 
of play, the Dukes outscored 
Morgan State 26-6, running the 
final score to 80-47. 

JMU's first roadtrip took 
them to sunny Tempe, Arizona, 
for the Arizona State Dial Clas- 
sic. JMU's first battle was 
against the Marquette War- 
riors, a powerhouse in the 
Great Midwest. The Dukes 
took an early lead and were 
ahead of the Warriors 44-35 in 
the first-half, but JMU couldn't 
hold on to the lead, ending with 
a loss, 92-79. But the Dukes 
made-up for their loss with a 
victory in the consolation 
round against Grand Canyon 
University. Lee scored a career 
high 16 points against GCU 
and was named to the all-tour- 
nament team, while Ratcliff 
also set a career mark at 18 
points. 

The team's next match took 
them down Interstate 81 to 
Radford University. 




^ y ^i"*^'' Sports 




PERFECT FORM ♦ Heather Hopkins 
shoots over the Spider defense. 
Hopkins was one of three freshmen 
to see playing time. 



MAKING A MOVE* Kara Ratliff looks for the ball 
as she posts up on her opponent. Ratliff turned in 
a tenacious performance in the paint against the 
ECU Pirates. 



STANDING TALL* Andrea 
Woodson troubles her Tribe 
defender at the Convo. Woodson 
came back from an injury to assist 
the Dukes in their successful season. 




GuHfoyle 



MOVIN' ON* Christina Lee blows 
past her opponent from George 
Mason. The Dukes won the game 56- 
53. 



Women's Basketball 



HUDDLE* During a dead ball, the 
members of the team huddle. Strong 
team unity boosted the morale of the 
team. 

ACCURACY ♦ Mary Eileen Algeo 
tries a 12 foot jumper against ECU. 
When she was not shooting, Algeo 
was frequently giving assists. 




BENDING LOW ♦Freshman 
Danielle Powell stretches for the 
loose ball. Powell brought good 
defensive techniques to the guard 
position. 



"17^2 Winter Sports 





DFF THE FINGERS* Krissy Heinbaugh takes a 
ay-iip in practice. Although sidelined much of the 
•eason, Heinbaugh promised to be a force on a 
alented team next year. 



N 




lur 



In 



ni 




in 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL TEAM 

OVERCAME INEXPERIENCE 

AND INJURIES 




Throughout the game, the two 
teams fought for the lead, even- 
tually sending the game into 
overtime. Even in the over- 
time play, the two teams were 
neck and neck, vying for the 
lead, but in the end, the High- 
landers edged the Dukes 84- 
80. "As a team we need to im- 
prove on our shot selection," 
commented Lee. "Our shot se- 
lection from the field is weak." 

After their three games 
away, the Dukes headed back 
to Harrisonburg to take on 
Maryland-Baltimore County. 
JMU overpowered the Retriev- 
ers from the getgo, finishing 
them off in style, 88-58. Even 
with injuries piling up on the 
team, the Dukes stomped on 
their opponents, with Ratcliff 
generating 25 points, her sea- 
son best. 

On December 2 1 , JMU faced 
one of its toughest opponents, 
Vermont. In the 1991-92 sea- 
son, Vermont went 29-1, 14-0 
in the North Atlantic Confer- 
ence, and sent their team to the 



NCAA Tournament. With 
three starters from that power- 
house team returning, JMU had 
a tough game to play. Even 
though JMU sent several 
women into double-digits, the 
sheer power of the Catamounts 
proved to be too much for the 
young Lady Dukes, who took 
their third loss. of the season. 

While most of the JMU cam- 
pus was away at winter break, 
the Lady Dukes took to the 
road, and ended up in Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, for the 
Lasalle Invitational. In the first 
round of competition, JMU 
faced the Nebraska 

Cornhuskers. The 

Cornhuskers kept JMU down 
the entire game, and Jackie 
Freeman was the only Duke in 
double digits, with 13 points. 
In the end, Nebraska came out 
the victor, 87-63. "Most of the 
teams on our schedule return 
veteran teams," said Moorman. 
"It's a killer schedule, and it 
doesn't fit where we are from a 
personnel and experience 

Women's Basketball 



standpoint." Moorman's plan 
for the year was to get in some 
hard games for her young team 
in order to get them to see what 
it was like, and to learn from 
their mistakes. 

The experience may have 
paid off for the Dukes because 
they came back in the consola- 
tion round to slaughter their 
competition. Central Connecti- 
cut State, 92-61. 

Playing great teams like Ver- 
mont and Nebraska really had 
an effect on the young Lady 
Dukes. JMU travelled back to 
the Convocation Center to face 
the Saint Peter's Peahens. With 
their increasing confidence, the 
Dukes sailed passed the Pea- 
hens 84-61. Junior Gail Shelly 
scored a career best 20 points 
in the effort. 

JMU's next challenge came 
from Virginia Commonwealth, 
who had all five of its starters 
return from the previous year. 
The Rams kept the Dukes on 
their toes, taking the lead sev- 
eral times during the game. 






C('j/r(csi/ cf S;n'r/s M,\fia RL■^^>ura^ 



Front Row: Christina Lee, Gail Shelly, Jackie Freeman, Sarah Schreib, Krissv Heinbaugh, Jackie Pratt, Mary Eileen 
Algeo, Danielle Powell. Second Row: Floretta Jackson, Robin Eldridge, Sherry Summers, Heather Hopkins, 
Michelle Gurile, Andrea Woodson, Kara Ratliff, Sheila Moorman, Betsy Blose, Andrea Morrison. 



Women's Basketball 



173 




WOMEN'S BASKETBALL TEAM 

OVERCAME INEXPERIENCE 

AND INJURIES 




In the end it was JMU who 
finished on top, though, taking 
the win 65-62. 

JMU's next battle was 
against the Spartans of UNC- 
Greensboro. The Lady Dukes 
sHd past the Spartans 63-45, 
sending several Dukes into 
double-digits. The JMU win 
was impressive, especially 
with one fourth of the team 
sidelined. "Injuries motivated 
us to play for those who 
couldn't play," commented 
freshman Heather Hopkins. 

That moti\'ation really paid 
off in their first three CAA 
games, after which they were a 
perfect 3-0 in the CAA and in 
first place, tied with Old Do- 
minion. In the first CAA game, 
Christina Lee scored 14 points 
before a record crowd of 4, 280 
at the Convo. The next con- 
tender was the Seahawks of 
UNC-Wilmington, who had 
four returning starters from the 
previous year. But again, the 
power of the Dukes was too 
much for the Seahawks to 
handle. The third CAA win for 



the Dukes came from the Tribe 
of William & Mary, who also 
had four returning starters to 
challenge the young Dukes. 

After going 3-0, the Dukes 
had to face one of their biggest 
challenges, their co-leaders in 
the CAA, Old Dominion. The 
Monarchs were the only CAA 
team to have all five starters 
return from the previous year, 
the year in which they snatched 
the CAA title away from the 
Lady Dukes. From the begin- 
ning of the game, one could see 
the experience of ODD take 
over the court. The Monarchs 
stunned the Dukes, holding 
them to 25% shooting in the 
first half and 307c for the game. 
JMU scored its lowest total in 
the entire season, only scoring 
42 points to Old Dominion's 
71. 

The next home game 
brought the Richmond Spiders 
to Harrisonburg for yet another 
CAA bout. The Dukes took an 
early lead in the first half, and 
held on to crush the Spiders 
76-59. "We want to maintain 



nit.nil, 




our second place status and 
peak during tournament time," 
said Hopkins. With the Rich- 
mond win under their belt, 
JMU upped their CAA record 
to 4-1, second behind ODU. 

On yet another road trip, 
the Dukes headed up to visit 
the American Eagles. The two 
teams played into overtime, 
but the Eagles were able to slide 
by JMU 75-69. "It was a disap- 
pointing loss," said sophomore 
Kara Ratcliff," it just proves 
that we need to improve on 
our away game record next 
year." It was a discouraging 
loss in that several players 
achieved career highs, such as 
Sophomore Christina Lee, who 
scored 21 points to lead the 
Dukes. 

As the conference season 
came to a close, the team had 
put itself in a good position for 
the tournament. Their tena- 
cious play earned them a good 
seed and a chance to challenge 
ODU, once again. This despite 
the problems they faced. 
-Joe Olson 




LCX)K AWAY^Gail 
Shelly dishes the ball 
off during a hiimo 
game. Shelly led the 



JUMPER* Using her 6'1" frame, 
freshman forward Heather Hopkins 
uses her height as an advantage. 
Four members on the young squad 



team in three-pointers. were over six feet tall. 




-i y A Winter Sports 




BANK SHOT* Sophomore Christina 
Lee goes up for two, despite a 
jammed finger. Injuries plagued the 
young team throughout the 1992-93 
season. 




BOX OUT ♦ Preparing to retrieve a 
foul shot, junior Andrea Woodson 
waits for the release of the ball. 
Woodson led the team in rebounds 
for most of the season. 



FINESSE ♦ Going up for an easy two 
points, sophomore Kara Ratliff 
reaches towards the basket. Ratcliff 
averaged over thirteen points a game 
for the season. 



Women's Basketball 



175 



ARMED & DANGEROUS* Shelly 
Brown faces off for competition. The 
team's great record was due to ski 
and hard work. 




LOCKER ROOM 
TALK* Coach 
Deborah Lung gives 
Lynn Mulhern and 
other team members 
' pre-meet advice. 
Lung's guidance was a 
large factor in her 
team's success. 

MASKED* Elaine 

Schoka prepares her 
defense in a home 
meet. Fencers had to be 
on guard all the time in 
order to block their 
opponents' moves. 



Ciiilfoitlc 




Fencing 



Guilfoi/U- 






i 



CiiilUn/U- 

PARRY NICE ♦Julie Benson moves in to 
attack an opponent with her foil. 
Fencers gained points for "point-on" 
attacks. 



^.i^^ 



I 



Front Row; Elaine Schoka, Lori Levine. Second Row: Julie Benson, 
Meredith Walters, Lvnn Mulhern, Shellv Brown, Kerrie Bogaz, Julia Tock, 
Melissa Fineo. 



^YS ^i"*^'^ Sports 



\ 



\ 



ONTEMPLATION ♦ Lori Levine watches a 
ammate compete in a match. Fencers perfected 
leir skills through practice and watching others 
erform. 





d. 




^=^ MIXTURE OF VETERANS 
AND NEW MEMBERS 
ALLOWED FENCERS TO 
FOIL FOES 



J 



♦ The JMU fencing team en- 
joyed a successful season, a fact 
attributed to the large number 
of returning fencers. The team 
had a strong tradition of six 
state championships to build 
upon, and did their best to fin- 
ish another season in the top 
ranks of state competition. 

Co-captain Lynn Mulhern 
claimed she returned to the 
team each season because fenc- 
ing is "a different kind of sport. 
Fencing is not a sport in which 
everyone partakes. Most high 
schools do not offer the option 
of fencing, so it is not a main- 
stream sport. That is why I like 
it — it is different than other 
sports." 

Another characteristic 
unique to fencing was the fact 
that it ran year long, with com- 
petitions held in both the fall 
and spring. The fall competi- 
tion focused on individual 



matches, and team competi- 
tions were held in the spring. 
Therefore, the 
women practiced 
year round, with a 
regimen that in- 
cluded daily prac- 
tice of fencing skills 
as well as weight 
lifting three days a 
week to increase 
agility and strength 
in the upper body and legs. 

The team had success early 
in the season with what Coach 
Deborah Lung considered "a 
major victory" over Navy. The 
team agreed with her senti- 
ments, and felt their team unity 
was a deciding factor in the 
victory. Despite the fact that 
there were new faces on the 
team, the women developed a 
quick bond that improved their 
performances through the ad- 
vice of other team niembers. 



"Everyone seems 

comfortable with 

everyone else, 

even the newest 

members. " 



Mulhern commented "we get 

a lot of enjoyment out of this 

sport. ..the veterans 

continue to return, 

and we always 

seem to have new 

recruits. Everyone 

seems comfortable 

with everyone else, 

even the newest 

members. They [the 

newest members] 

get right out there and seem to 

enjoy themselves." 

The fencing team's effort 
paid off in February when they 
won their sixth straight state 
title. Elaine Schoka won the 
individual title and Mulhern 
finished second as the Dukes 
advanced to regionals and as- 
pired to NCAA competition. 
-Jen Williams 
Heather Gustin 




PRACTICE^ Lori Levine lunges at 
Kerrie Bogaz in practice at Godwin. 
The fencing team continued their 
winning ways in 1992-93. 



ATTACK ♦With balance and proper 
form, Meredith Walters practices at 
Godwin. The Dukes' practice paid 
off with their sixth straight state title. 



Fencing ^~7~Z 





1 992-93 WAS A BANNER YEAR 

FOR THE MALE SWIMMERS 

AND DIVERS 



♦ With two new coaches and 
a relatively young squad, the 
men's swimming and diving 
team faced the very difficult 
task of defending their title as 
CAA champions. Having 
claimed the championship title 
in 1991-92, the new team had a 
lot to live up to. Coach Sid 
Cassidy began his career as 
JMU's head coach, ha ving been 
the assistant coach for rival 
Florida State University. His 
first season was a successful 
one, as he led the Dukes to 
victories over such opponents 
as Duke, Shippensburg and 
George Washington. The 
Dukes dominated the CAA, de- 
feating everyone on the con- 
ference schedule through Janu- 
ary. The Dukes were proud of 
their record despite losses to 
the University of Pittsburgh 
and Florida State, two schools 
ranked in the top thirty. 

The successful season was 
accomplished through the ef- 
forts of both seasoned veterans 



BiliTTT 

MM U| 

niiBi 



and relatively young team- 
mates. Jeremy Davey led the 
team both as captain and as a 
leader in the backstroke and 
individual medley events. He 
swam individual bests in ev- 
ery one of his events at the 
Pittsburgh meet, as did many 
of the other swimmers. An- 
other strong swimmer for the 
Dukes was sophomore Mark 
Gabriele. Winning events in 
nearly every meet, Gabriele 
gained NCAA considerations 
for his times in both the 100 
and 200 meter butterfly. He 
hoped to automatically qualify 
for the NCAA's by swimming 
well at the CAA champion- 
ships. Other primary competi- 
tors for the Dukes were sopho- 
more Derek Boles and sopho- 
more Gian Pozzolini. 

The diving squad had new 
coaching as well, as Mike 
Westwood joined the Dukes 
from Penn State. A four-time 
NCAA qualifier, Westwood 
brought both diving and coach- 

Men's Swim /Dive 



ing experience to the JMU team. 
Overcoming injuries and the 
loss of their best d i ver to gradu- 
ation, the Dukes concentrated 
on turning inexperienced 
divers into strong competi- 
tors. Chad Triolet returned as a 
strong competitor, while senior 
Greg Roth, sophomore Chris 
Lee, freshmen Pat Cavanaugh 
and Omid Jazaeri developed 
into divers on a competitive 
level. Their best competition 
was the meet against Florida 
State and Duke at Tallahassee, 
when the Dukes beat the Blue 
Devils. 

The young squads com- 
peted well this season, and 
with the recruiting strengths 
of the new coaches, they looked 
forward to continued success 
for the program. 

-Kate Travers 

HIGH ROLLER ♦ Omid Jazaeri 
performs from the high dive as the 
judges and fans look on. Such 
performances helped the Dukes beat 
teams like Duke during the season. 



^2^ 



f^f^i,^W 






'C. 



«ii;.-j 



First Row: Coach Mike Westwood, Pat Cavanaugh, Omid Jazaeri, Matt Stanshurv, Mark Patton, Mark Gabriele, 
Derek Boles, Bryan Holden, Captain Jeremy Davey, Corbitt Wright, Coach Sid Cassidy. Second Row: Coach David 
Tyler, Jeff Taylor, Bob Horsch, Chad Seegars, Brian Flamm, David Caldwell, Chad Troilet, Greg Burns, Chris Schutz, 
Mike Powell, Rich Rowland. Third Row: Stefan Huh, Gian Pozzolini, Jason Bing, Kevin Faikish, Erik Doetsch, Matt 
Benin, Matt Franko, Adam Kidder, Steven Ball, Matt Baranv, Grog Roth, 




^....^1. ■ . irh>i>iiti 



"i y8 Winter Sports 




STAR SPANGLED ♦ Senior Jeremy Davey holds 
the flag aloft at the beginning of a meet at JMU. 
The young team made a valiant defense of their 
CAA title in the 1992-93 season. 




CONGRATULATIONS* A group of wmnmg 
JMU swimmers gather after a meet. JMU 
consistently had strong finishers throughout the 
season. 



Men's Swim /Dive 



UNTUCKED ♦ Junior Sandra Martello comes out 
of a tuck as she completes a dive. The women's 
di\ing team competed with precision and grace in 
the 1992-93 season. 











_*._ 




kiU 









I . I- ♦ 5S 



Z'i I 



I 65 • I I » 70 li 



MEETS 

Virginia Tech 

Drexel 

at South CaroHna 

at American 

at Old Dominion 

at Buffalo Invitational 

at Florida State and Duke 

Shippensburg 

George Washington 

at William and Mary 

Richmond 




BREATHER ♦One of the "S'Women" 
turns her head out of the water to 
take a breath. Freestyle was one of 
the more popular events at the swim 
meets. 




MORAL SUPPORT* Freshman Kristin Brinser 
stays along the pool's edge to congratulate 
swimmer Missy Zipf as she completes her final 
lap. Teammates provided a great amount of 
encouragement during meets. 



THRILL OF VICTORY* A swimmer 
checks her winning time after her 
event. Several members of the JMU 
team participated in more than one 
event. 



^80 W'"''^'' Sports 



i 

■tRAIGHT & NARROW ♦Junior Sharon Freeland 
Hnters the water without a splash. Clean and 
Berfect performances were the result of many 
Hours of practice. 







FEMALE SWIMMERS AND 
DIVERS CONTINUED TO MAKE JMU A 
FORCE TO BE RECKONED WITH 



♦ The JMU women's swim 
and dive team excelled in al- 
most every meet it entered . The 
combination of seasoned vet- 
erans, with fresh new talent, 
proved to be a force that few 
could overcome. 

JMU's first meet ended with 
an explosive win for the Lady 
Dukes, blowing past Virginia 
Tech 149-94. "It was an im- 
pressive win," commented 
coach Judy Wolfe, "the Hokies 
have always had a strong pro- 
gram." 

The Dukes next meet proved 
to be no different, with JMU 
paddling by Drexel 182-99. It 
was one of their most impres- 
sive wins, taking the Dukes to 
2-0. 

With two wins behind them, 
the Lady Dukes faced a rough 
four- meet road trip, sending 
them up and down the east 
coast. Their first meet required 
a visit to the University of South 
Carolina, where the Dukes 
were overcome 95-203. "We 



weren't as strong as our first 
two meets," said Cindy Walker 
"but it was a great 
learning tool for the 
rest of the season." 

JMU's next two 
meets proved that 
the team could 
learn from their 
mistakes. The 
Dukes surpassed 
CAA rivals Ameri- 
can and Old Dominicin, taking 
their record to 4-1 overall and 
2-0 in the CAA. The Dukes' 
next challenge was at the Buf- 
falo Invitational. JMU was up 
against eight other teams, but 
the Lady Dukes rallied and 
took first place honors. 

Over the last part of winter 
break, the Dukes travelled 
down to Florida, competing in 
two tough meets. JMU first took 
on the Blue Devils , overcom- 
ing Duke to win the meet. Beat- 
ing such an ACC powerhouse 
showed JMU's total team 
strength, but the meet also had 



"Our win was 

very important 

to show our 

power in the 

CAA." 

♦ 



a down side. At that same tour- 
nament, JMU faced the tough 
host team. Florida 
State edged past the 
Dukes, giving them 
their second loss. 

Later in the sea- 
son, JMU took its 
record to 8-2 with 
an impressive win 
over CAA rival Wil- 
liam and Mary. The 
Dukes stomped the Tribe's 
swimmers, placing first in 
twelve of the thirteen events. 
"Our win was very important 
to show our power in the 
CAA," commented swimmer 
Erin McDonnell, winner of the 
100-yard and 1000-yard 
freestyle. 

The JMU women's swim 
and dive team had an impres- 
sive year, earned top honors in 
most meets they entered while 
reniaining a powerhouse in the 
CAA. 



-Joe Olson 




Women's Swim/ Dive 




First Row: Sharon Freeland, Michelle Stefan, Melissa Tallent, Kristni Bruiser, Trish 
Lazarus, Cindy Walker, Julie Shea, Peggy Keane. Second Row: Amy Robinson, Christine 
Schilling, Missy Zipf, Kristen David, Denice Luviano, Caitlyn Fitzmaurice, Meri VoUmer, 
Stacy Beard, Marcy Lipp. Kristin Colvin. Third Row: Sandy Martello, Jen Flannery, Jenny 
Simmons, Malia Bell, KrisHn Balint, Kathv Hawk, Becky Andrews, Erin McDonnell, 
Annette Bultema, Melissa Stefan. 



Women's Swim/Dive ^ f-\^ 





YOUNG, TALENTED WRESTLING 

TEAM GOT THE JMU PROGRAM 

ROLLING 




♦ Last season the JMU wres- 
tling team only held one senior 
on the roster, and this season 
that number only rose to two. 
Using last year as a rebuilding 
year allowed the young team 
to season into more experi- 
enced wrestlers. Coach Jeff 
Bowyer said, "We're still real 
young with only two seniors. 
Now that the younger wres- 
tlers have had a chance to learn 
the system, we can spend more 
time on technique." 

This season's recruiting 
class was one of the best Coach 
Bowyer had ever haci, but he 
knew that the lack of collegiate 
experience might hinder his 
youthful team. "We have great 
recruits with great talent, but 
the problem witlt having such 
great talent is that everybody, 
including myself, expect great 
things right away. Without the 
experience, they put them- 
selves in situations where they 
get too aggressive at times and 
wrestle sloppy, but that's just 
from the lack of experience," 



noted Bowyer. 

Injuries were such a prob- 
lem in wrestling that the team 
who showed up the healthiest, 
often did the best. When JMU 
was able to put all of their men 
on the mat, they were one of 
the best in their conference, and 
proved so by winning the JMU 
Invitational, beating teams like 
Virginia Tech, VMl, and the 
University of Virginia. 

This season's team was led 
by fifth-year senior, Mike 
Smith, and third-year sopho- 
more, Brian Dugan. The two 
captains agreed that the team 
had progressed a lot this sea- 
son. Smith felt that the 
program's progress was due 
to an excellent recruiting year, 
a good team attitude, as well as 
coach maturation. Smith said 
that being one of the only vet- 
erans on the team had its perks. 
"1 can enter each match with 
years of experience under my 
belt as well as confidence," he 
said. 

Throughout the season, the 



Wrestling 



Dukes relied on individual ef- 
fort and motivation. "We're 
performing the best we can 
right now. Every time we put 
one of our guys on the mat, we 
get a good effort. We can't al- 
ways put our best wrestlers 
out because of injuries, but the 
wrestlers that we put out are 
doing a good job," said Bowyer. 

Bowyer added that the one 
change for next year will prob- 
ably be to start later in the year. 
"Since it is a sixth month long 
season, starting later in the sea- 
son should cut back on inju- 
ries." 

The future couldn't help but 
look good for the JMU wres- 
tling program with high goals 
and promising talent. Sopho- 
more Jude Arena said, "We're 
definitely headed in the right 
directions. We only graduate 
two seniors and we plan to just 
build on each year." 

-Jon-nell Berry 

CHAMPION ♦ Brian Gray claims 
another victory for JMU. The Dukes 
were led by coach Jeff "Peanut" 
Bowyer, in his fifth year of coaching. 




Cotirle$\l of Sports Mciitil Kc 



First Row: Jtm Wadsvvorth, Mike Loomis, Mike Gordon, Jamie Wnde, J.imie Arnett, Jon Fair, Pete Smith, Joii Guarino, Matt Wieand. 
Second Row: Brian Koogler, Matt Chang, Chris Morse, Jason Wetih, David Leventhal, Sean McKenzie, Alex Gardner, Sloan Frey, Roy 
Campbell, Jared Giordano, Doug Detrick, Reid Suko, Travis Hicks. Third Row: Coach Jeff Bowyer, John Clayton, Andy Jenkins, Keith 
Zimmerman, Danny Link, Andrew DeFilippis, Kurt Hulett, Mike Smith, Franke Slanek, Todd Crompton, Jude Arena, John Capriotti, 
Brian Gray, Josh Henson, Dan Bender, Bob Hamilton, Cris Lull, Coach Ken Herceg. 



'I 8 2 ^i"^^'' Sports 




HOLDING ON ♦ Bob Hamilton grapples with his 
opponent in a match at Godwin Hall. As in the 
previous two seasons, the Dukes occasionally 
struggled with injuries in 1992-93. 





WORKING HARD ♦ 
Jude Arena prepares to 
roll his opponent. The 
Dukes' twenty-first 
season was one of 
improvement. 



CONCENTRATION* 
Trying to stay out of a 
tough position, Sean 
McKenzie fights for 
leverage on his 
opponent. JMU had 
one of the best 
recruiting classes in the 
country in 1992. 



Wrestling ^ Q^ 



BALANCE ♦ Perfect position on the 
parallel bars is what Scott Never shoots 
for. The parallel bars required a 
tremencioiis amount of concentration 
and upper body strength. 




MEETS 
at Navy Invitational 
at Radford 
at Cornell 
Shenandoah Valley Invita- 
tional 
William and Mary 
at Great Lakes Champion- 
ships 
at NAGL Championships 
Kent State 
at William and Mary 
at ECAC Championships 
Virginia State Champion- 
ships 




PERFECTLY STILL* Working on 
the still rings, Dan Ryan tries to 
perfect his move. The rings were a 
tough event for most gymnasts, 
requiring a number of different 
skills. 

ON HIS HIGH HORSE* Co-captain 
Mike Onuska prepares for his 
dismount. Onuska, one of JMU's 
best, finished first on the pommel 
horse against Radford with an 8.6. 



■Ptf 



^ g Zf Winter Sports 





jj^:^ 





MEN'S GYMNASTICS TEAM 

WORKED WELL AS A UNIT IN 

1992-93 



J} 



♦ After a 1991-92 season full 
of injuries, the men's gymnas- 
tics team embarked on their 
1992-93 season with a strict 
work-out regimen that empha- 
sized flexibility and weight 
training to lower the risk of 
repeat injuries. 

The season began when the 
JMU men competed in the 
Navy Invitational Meet, a con- 
sistent, but not extraordinary 
effort. The meet was encourag- 
ing, but it also showed the team 
what improvements the sea- 
son would need to bring, as co- 
captain Mike Jenks noted. "The 
team basically did well for this 
first meet, yet there is much 
room for improvement," said 
Jenks. The Dukes finished fifth 
at the Navy Invitational, 
though they placed first in the 
rings and floor exercise. Will- 
iam and Mary, Pittsburgh, 
Navy, and Radford were oth- 

POISED ♦John Seeley attempts a 
cross on the still rings. Seeley 
received a 9.0 on the rings against 
Radford, earning a second place. 



ers that participated in the in- 
vitational. 

In their first regular meet, 
JMU faced Radford in one of 
the closest meets of the year. 
After the floor exercise, the two 
teams were neck and neck, with 
Todd Mercer tying the top 
Radford gymnast at 8.95. In all, 
JMU placed first in three out of 
the six events, with Mike 
Onuska taking all around hon- 
ors. Despite the effort, though, 
Radford managed to slip by 
the Dukes 233.15 to 232.65. 

Men's gymnastics were a 
little different than women's. 
The only two events that both 
have in common were the vault 
and the floor exercise, but in 
the men's event the vault is 
placed longways to make it 
more challenging. The men's 
other events were the pommel 
horse, still rings, parallel bars, 
and the horizontal bar. 

To attain improvement, the 
men upgraded their strict prac- 
tice routines. Practices con- 
sisted of four hour workouts. 



five days a week. During each 
day of practice, the team mem- 
bers perfected several differ- 
ent routines, while also work- 
ing on improving their flex- 
ibility. During practice, the 
team members also offered 
each other advice on how to 
add creativity and enthusiasm 
to individual routines. 

The eight man team was 
very close and the support they 
offered each other helped im- 
prove performances and build 
confidence. Co-captain Mike 
Onuska felt this closeness was 
an asset to the team as the sea- 
son progressed after the Navy 
Invitational. "Each meet is a 
learning experience, we can see 
our weaknesses, then work to- 
gether to eliminate those weak- 
nesses," he said. Apparently 
the Dukes were quick learners 
as the gymnasts turned in an- 
other strong season at JMU. 

-Jen Williams 
Heather Gustin 



Men's Gymnastics 




LOitlU^lt Ot b^lO!l> iWcdhl Kt'xflJIt 



Left to right: Travis King, Co-captain Michael Jenks, John Seeley, Scott Neyer, Scott 
Verschilling, Todd Mercer, Dan Rvan, Co-captain Mike Onuska 



Men's Gymnastics '^ P\^ 



BALANCING ACT* Julie 
Cardiiiali practices her skills 
on the beam. Gymnasts 
worked hard in practice to 
perfect their skills and moves. 



PERFECT TEN ♦Alisa 
Gosline concentrates before 
her dismount. This was a 
difficult event as the beam 
was only four inches wide. 




i-L 




FLYING SOLO ♦Missy 
Liposky grasps the high 
bar during her uneven 
parallel bar routine. 



^QS Winter Sports 



IN PROGRESS* Coach Scott 
Gauthier and a gymnast 
discusss the results of the 
team competition. 






GYMNASTS SHOWED THEIR STUFF 
IN ANOTHER STRONG SEASON 




♦ Using individual strengths 
and strong team unity, the JMU 
women's gymnastics team 
proved their worth in the C A A 
as well as against non-confer- 
ence competitors. 

Performing the extremely 
difficult moves in gymnastics 
took several hours of practice, 
usually about five times a week. 
Without this training and hard 
mental concentration, the team 
would not have been able to 
perform as well, while increas- 
ing the possibility of injuries." 

While total team points de- 
termined the winner of each 
meet, individual competition 
was also a strong factor in all 
JMU victories. Each gymnast 
was competing against each 
other as well as the other teams. 

Of the different events, bal- 
ance beam, floor exercise, 
vaulting, and the uneven par- 
allel bars, each gymnast had 
one event that they excelled in. 
While awards were given in 



each category, gymnasts tried 
to excel in all categories in or- 
der to win all- 
around honors. 

The gymnasts' 
practice began to 
pay off early in the 
season. In their sec- 
ond meet, the 
Dukes travelled up 
to East Brunswick, 
New Jersey, to face Rutgers. 
JMU almost swept the four 
events, placing first in three of 
them. Julie Cardinali per- 
formed an excellent floor exer- 
cise to receive a 9.4, Sharie 
Murphy soared to a 9.15 in the 
vault, and Jennifer Grinnell 
won with an impressive 9.2 in 
the uneven parallel bars. Even 
though no one from JMU won 
the all-around competition, 
JMU took the victory, passing 
by Rutgers, 181.55 to 179.70. 
Such well rounded individual 
efforts set the pace for the 1 992- 
93 season. 



Women's Gymnastics 



"Our team 
really uses 
individual 

strengths as a 
tool. " 

♦ 



"Our team really uses indi- 
vidual strengths as a tool in 
our 
meets,"commented 
Julie 
Cardinali, "where 
one girl is weak, 
another girl can 
pick up the 
slack. "After the 
Rutgers victory, 
JMU boosted its record to 2-0. 
JMU challeged itself, facing 
tough competition outside of 
the CAA. Its third meet was a 
four way meet against Cornell, 
Northeastern, and Kent State. 
The Dukes approached every 
event like it was the only one, 
concentrating hard on the in- 
dividual victory, while still try- 
ing to earn a team win. 

The Dukes proved to be a 
powerful entity in gymnastics, 
neatly reconciling individual- 
ity and the team concept. 
-Joe Olson 




iSiinrlL'^tiof Sports Mcdm Rc^iirces 



LEAPS & BOUNDS ♦Junior Sharie Murphy 
prepares to complete her last tumbling pass in her 
floor routine. The floor exercise was one of the 
four events during a meet in which gymnasts 
participated. 



First Row: Co-captain Missv Liposky, Julie Cardinali, Marchelle Yoch, Meg Woods, Ivy Wells, Joy Wells, Emily 
Winett. Second Row: Alystra Little, Penny Cash, Co-captain Alisa Gosline, Vikki Kettlehut, Jennifer Grinnell, Kim 
Kupkam, Mary Hayes, Sharie Murphy. 



Women's Gymnastics '^ f-K~7 



SELF DEFENSE* The JMU Marti.il 
Arts Club warms up with knumb- 
chucks. Members met weekly to 
\vork on their skills. 



NICE TRY4 A rugby player laterals 
the ball to his teammate in an 
attempt to score. The men's rugby 
team has consistently placed among 
the top teams in the state. 




CLUB SPORTS 

Bowling 

Caving 

Fencing 

Co-Ed Field Hockey 

Co-Ed Water Polo 

Women's Rugby 

Men's Rugby 

Women's Softball 

Outing 

Martial Arts 

Karate 

Men's Lacrosse 

Men's Volleyball 



CAVE MAN ♦ Graham Youngblood 
sits on a ledge in a cave near 
Harrisonburg. The caving club 
travelled to many local caves. 



H,m-> 






bi-thn 






I^H 


■ 


^ 




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flv ^ 




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' - 




^Kr 






^ P\f\ Sports Feature 





.JMU STUDENTS LOOK TO CLUB 

SPORTS FOR COMPETITION AND 

GOOD TIMES 




♦ Club sports at JMU pro- 
vided an opportunity for all 
students to get involved, offer- 
ing an alternative to varsity 
sports. From caving to racquet- 
ball, club sports gave many a 
chance to get involved in a 
broad range of activities. 

JMU has always been a force 
at rugby, winning several state 
tournaments. This school year 
was no exception. The 
women's team took the state 
title, won regional honors, and 
was ranked third in the east 
coast. The men's team also car- 
ried on its winning tradition, 
finishing third in the state. 

JMU's Bowling Club took 
regular outings to Valley Lanes 
on South Main Street. Experi- 
enced and not-so-experienced 
bowlers played together in an 
atmosphere of friendly com- 
petition. "You have your good 
days and your bad days, but 
it's always good to have friends 
supporting you," said senior 
Chris Pursell. 

For a different twist, the 



Caving Club sponsored trips 
to local caves. Caving provided 
more of a challenge than most 
club sports due to its strenu- 
ous physical demands. "1 re- 
ally like that 3-D Maze 
Cave. ..it's tough, but it's so 
much fun," commented Cav- 
ing Club Vice-President Gra- 
ham Youngblood. The 3-D 
Maze Cave was a local cave 
fifteen minutes away from 
campus. 

One of the most popular club 
sports was skiing. JMU's close 
proximity to Massanutten Ski 
Resort made the skiing trips 
both convenient and enjoyable. 
For the novice skier, lessons 
were available in both skiing 
and snowboarding, while 
Massanutten's advanced trails 
allowed the more experienced 
skier to show off his expertise. 

Closer to home, JMU's War- 
ren Campus Center provided 
a club sport of it's own — pool. 
The pool rooms were always 
filled, and club members could 
be seen sneaking in games be- 



fore class as well as in the 
evening hours. 

For those with a death wish, 
skydiving was also an option 
for some students. Some stu- 
dents were turned away from 
skydiving because of its high 
danger aspect and its high cost. 

For those who wanted a 
thrilling time, but with a little 
less chance of injury, white 
water rafting was an alterative. 
Rivers Inc., in Lansing, West 
Virginia, offered a large vari- 
ety of river trips. Their week- 
end package was a favorite, 
providing two nights camp- 
ing, New River Gorge raft trip, 
buffet lunch, pasta dinner, and 
drinks at the Red Dog Saloon. 

No matter what the sport, 
JMU's clubs offered a wide 
variety of choices while pro- 
viding instruction and friend- 
ship to all those involved. 

-Elizabeth Cartwright 




Gtiilftn/le 



BULLSE\E» A JMU soffball player cleanly picks 
up a grounder. On rainy days, the team went into 
Godwin for practice. 



SPLISH SPLASH iJMU waterpolo members 
defend their goal. The waterpolo team enjoyed 
playing a game that few people ever experienced. 



Club Sports ^QO 




CHEERS! Three ]MU students are 
among many spectators who cheer on 
the Dukes. The enthusiasm and spirit 

of the crowds helped motivate the 
team players. 

HEAD TO HEAD. Dan Colitti and 

Kerri Callahan take advantage of an 

empty bike rack outside of the Ubrary 

for a chat. Friendships made on 

campus helped alleviate stress. 

OLASSBS BVJTO-R: 

KRDSTJ 

Sh\AL^K(£L'[=OKV 



Rogers 



POWER 



OF 
THE 




Each individual made his or her own 
impact on student Hfe at JMU. Fresh- 
men to seniors had equal opportunity to 
express their views by voicing their 
opinion and supporting things they 
believed in. Each set of class officers 
combined the individuality of the stu- 
dents into a unifying force to work for 
change. 

Groups of students with similar ideas 
and beliefs came together to make their 
impact on JMU. When people talked, 
they not only made their individual 
voices heard, but many times suceeded 
in influencing others and making their 
impact in that manner. Their influence 
was evident as more students became 
involved and spoke out for what they 
thought was important. 

From the freshmen about to take the 
first step into life on their own to the 
seniors about to leave for the real 
world, students had opportunities to 
make their impact. 



INDIVIDUAL 



Classes Divider ^ ^ ^ 



Meredith A. Abbate,Sp. Path /Theatre,Portsmouth, RI 

James L. Abercrombie, Mgt, DanviIle,VA 

A. James Acosta, Mass Comm., Springfield, VA 

WilHam M. Acree, Psych., Tappahannock, VA 

Gillian L. Adams, hit. Affairs/French, Arlington, VA 



Laurel R. Adams, History, Forest Hill, MD 

Stacv L. Adkisson, Spanish, Richmond, VA 

Sarah E. Ainsley, Psych., Waynesboro, VA 

Michael A. Akers, Fin. /CIS, Fredericksburg, VA 

Tanya Albert, Business, Kelkheim, Germany 




BONDING. Seniors John Rogers and 
Carrie Desmond relax and catch up on 
the latest news. After four years, most 
seniors had formed strong and lasting 
friendships with fellow students. 



HARDLY WORKING. Seniors Angle 
and Scott Reynolds hang-out in the 
WXJM office. Working together for 
several years helped create friendships 
between people with similar interests. 



Diane I. Albrite, Psych., Harrisonburg, VA 

Jody M. Albrittton, Graph. Design, Buena Vista, VA 

John S. Aldridge, Actg, Roanoke, VA 

Vonya P. AUeyne, Mktg, Harrisonburg, VA 

Mitchelie Alston, Human Comm., Dover, DE 



Kara L. Anderson, Actg, Richmond, VA 

Travis L. Anderson, Mgt, Sugar Grove, VA 

Peter K. Angstadt, Jr., Actg, Dover, DE 

Pamela D. Anthony, Speech Path., Portsmouth, VA 

Jo Ellen Ardinger, Pol. Science, Hagerstown, MD 



Nicole M. Ardoin, Int. Bus., low^a City, lA 

Philip A. Arra, Fin., Aldie, VA 

Elizabeth M. Arritt, Fash. Merch., Covington, VA 

Cary S. Ashby, English, The Plains, VA 

Laura J. Asiello, Actg, Springfield, VA 



192 



Seniors 




Kara G. Atkins, Comm., Richmond, VA 
John L. Atkinson, Mktg, Richmond, VA 
Kristen Auclair, Eng./ Human Comm., Fulton, MD 
Amy T. Aument, Enghsh, Falls Church, VA 
Michelle R. Averette, Theatre, Va. Beach, VA 



Kent H. Baake, Mgt, Alexandria, VA 

Sarah L. Bachman, Psych., Pasadena, MD 

Ameer A. Badri, Comp. Science, Harrisonburg, VA 

Brian K. Bailey, CIS, Huntsville, AL 

Carol A. Bailey, Math/Sec. Ed, Baltimore, MD 



For ThE Last TIivie 




3eK\ioi^s p\^e,pcM^e- to 

You could spot them among a 
crowd of 10,000. They were the 
ones who either had perma-grin 
syndrone or who looked like they 
had pulled twenty consecutive all- 
nighters. One night they were 
frantically conducting research in 
the library; the next night they 
were celebrating at JM's. They 
were Seniors. 

The senior year was character- 
ized by both carefree and stress- 
ful times. Bombarded by count- 
less thesises and projects, seniors 
spent a great deal of time research- 
ing, writing and presenting. 
Graduate school applications, re- 
sumes and interviews com- 
pounded the stress. Being an up- 
perclassman did have its advan- 



say tkeit^ good-byes 

tages, however. Priority class reg- 
istration was always a cherished 
priveledge. 

After four years of the college 
experience, seniors had mixed 
emotions about leaving JMU. "A 
part of me will always be with 
JMU," commented senior Ann 
O'Connor. Senior Doug Rose felt 
that the positive apects of gradu- 
ating would overshadow the 
negative aspects such as leaving 
friends behind. 'T'm definitely 
ready to close this part of my life 
and move on." While seniors ad- 
mitted that a fear of the unknown 
was in the back of their mind, 
they agreed that they were ex- 
cited about the future. 
-Cindy Scott 



Karin L. Bailey, Mass Comm., Lynchburg, VA 
James S. Bak, Hth. Science/Phys.Ther.,Annandale,VA 
Caryn A. Baker, English, Va. Beach, VA 
Karen M. Baker, Mktg, Sterling, VA 
Sarah F. Baker, Psych., Norfolk, VA 



Megan M. Baldwin, Psych., Westerville, OH 
Sarah D. Baldwin, Alt. Disp. Res., Vienna, VA 
Daniel Balkey, Actg, Marlton, NJ 
Molly A. Ball, Mktg/Kines., Laguna Beach, CA 
Stephen Y. Ball, Psych., Pittsburgh, PA 



Brooke S. Ballantyne, Biology, Springfield, VA 
Cynthia L. Ballentine, Vocal Perf., Fairfax, VA 
K. Stuart Bane, English, Salem, VA 
Philip W. Barbour, English, Roanoke, VA 
Kelly J. Barefoot, Mktg, Wexford, PA 



Seniors [^ ^ 



Karen L. Barger, CIS, Purcellville, VA 

Christine A. Barile, Int. Bus., Harrisonburg, VA 

Lisa M. Barnes, Biology, McLean, VA 

Amy P. Barnett, Psych., Newport News, VA 

Lisa A. Barsnica, Speech Path., Fairfax Station, VA 



Becky L. Bartells, Biology, Forest, VA 

Matthew J. Bartlett, Finance, Rockville, MD 

Kathryn L. Barton, Psych., Woodstock, NY 

Tonna K. Basham, Actg, Charlottesville, VA 

Jamie M. Baskerville, Pol. Sci./MCOM, McLean, VA 




TiiE Coiviii\q of AqE 

Sfuderv-l-s celeb^*a+e fKeir legality irv a variety o^ ways 



All students could not 
wait for it to happen. Anticipa- 
tion began sometime during the 
student's junior year. By that 
time, some friends had already 
done it, while others soon 
followed. It was inevitable, it 
was unavoidable, and it was 
well worth the wait — turning 
twenty-one. 

Being of age had special 
significance in a college town. 
Nights were no longer limited 
to friends' parties. Suddenly, a 
whole new world had been 
opened. What was once only 
dreamed of actually occurred. 
Happy Hour at JM's, karaoke 
night at Tulley's and Baltimore 
Zoos at Spanky's. 



Nothing quite com- 
pared to the actual birthday 
celebration. Senior Marcia 
Rahming said, "I threw a party 
on my birthday. I also went out 
and had my first drink at 
Spanky's. I got a Roasted and 
Toasted and two pitchers of 
beer." 

Other students made it 
a point to go out and test their 
new legal IDs. "My friends and 
I went to the store and paraded 
around with beer boxes on our 
heads. My friend tried to take 
my picture getting my ID 
checked, but the guy wouldn't 
let us," explained senior Leona 
Baker. 

But what about those 



students that did not turn 
twenty-one during the school 
year? Did they miss out on the 
tradition of the 21 cent pitcher? 
"I thought I was missing out, 
but on my birthday my closest 
friends came to see me and 
they took me out. 1 still had an 
awesome birthday with my 
friends from school even if it 
wasn't at JMU," said senior 
Robin Parker. 

When it is finally time 
to get that 21 cent pitcher at 
JM's, students found a driver, 
got some extra money and, 
most importantly, didn't forget 
their two ID's. 

-Anna Seldon 




Stacey L. Bassler, Health Fitness, Midlothian, VA 

Erica M. Bates, Speech Path., Lanham, MD 

Jarvis E. Bates, Finance, Lexington, KY 

Ingrid A. Batra, Nursing, Falls Church, VA 

Karen E. Bautz, English, Annandale, VA 



Jason S. Bazar, Int. Affairs, Va. Beach, VA 

Lisa N. Beck, Speech Path., Va. Beach, VA 

Paula D. Beeghly, Psych., Somerset, PA 

Stephanie A. Bekhor, Eng. /Spanish, Fairfax, VA 

Stephanie L. Bell, Mathematics, Montclair, VA 



Susan E. Belmont, Int. Bus., Hauppauge, NY 

Heidi S. Bensenhaver, English, Va. Beach, VA 

Michele E. Benson, Mass Comm., Hampton, VA 

William R. Benton, Psych., Lexington, VA 

Kirsten E. Berg, Mass Comm., Fairfax, VA 




194 



Seniors 




Barbara Berger, Comm., Simsbury, CT 

Jonathan L. Bernstein, Actg, Fredericksburg, VA 

Jason L. Bertholomey, Biology, Pulaski, VA 

Sheila N. Bess, Actg, Portsmouth, VA 

Lysa E. Biederman, Theatre/Antho., Annandale, VA 



Sibyl L. Biller, Econ, Waynesboro, VA 
Robert A. Bingham, History, Burke, VA 
Tammi L. Bird, Mktg, Pasadena, MD 
Lisa M. Bishop, Mathematics, Palmyra, PA 
Jon H. Bjork, CIS, Great Falls, VA 




BOTTOMS UP! Students toast to 
celebrate the arrival of the weekend. 
Students considered not only taste but 
also the price when choosing their beer. 



THE GOOD LIFE. Senior Glenn 
Bloodworth engages the assistance of a 
sofa cusion to avoid falling over. A 
student's twenty-first birthday was 
usually a landmark occaison. 




James S. Black, Anthropology, Vienna, VA 
Bethany J. Blair, Psych., Falls Church, VA 
Deidre Y. Bland, Actg, Petersburg, VA 
Glen A. Bloodworth, Biology, Charlottesville, VA 
James S. Boatwright, Psych., Bristol, VA 



Tracy E. Bodeo, Biology, Belford, NJ 

Lara J. Bohlool, CIS, Woodbridge, VA 

Tabitha M. Boley, Mgt, Madison, VA 

R. Michael Bollar, Human Comm., Richmond, VA 

Jeanne M. BoUendorf, Anthropology, Crozet, VA 



Rudolf V. Boquiron, Finance, Va. Beach, VA 
Daniel B. Borden, Biology, Reston, VA 
Jason A. Bosher, Mgt, Kilmarnock, VA 
Mark R. Boucher, Mgt, Harrisonburg, VA 
Lauren D. Bowers, English, Ellicott City, MD 



Seniors [ ^^ 



Trent A. Bowers, Mktg, Fairfax, VA 

Rebecca L. Bradshaw, Social Work, Richmond, VA 

Lolita E. Breckenridge, History, Portsmouth, VA 

Erin B. E. Breland, Music Ed., Woodbridge, VA 

Jennifer M. Bresnahan, Psych., Manassas, VA 



Scott M. Breza, Biology, La Vale, MD 

Michelle M. Brisson, Hth&Hum. Serv., Arlington, VA 

Lara M. Brittain, Music Ed., Woodbridge, VA 

Barbara J. Britton, English, Newport News, VA 

Crystal L. Brogan, Physics, Roanoke, VA 













UNSTOPPABLE. Kareem Robinson 
goes up for two. It was the first official 
opportunity for the players to show 
their stuff on the court. 



STRIKE A POSE. Morgan Smith 
performs during Midnight Madness. 
The Dukettes provided pre-game 
entertainment. 



Kristine E. Brooker, Comm., Vienna, VA 

Christine E. Brookhart, MCOM/Eng., Alexandria,VA 

Karen A. Brooks, MCOM, Colonial Heights, VA 

Sheila H.M. Brooks, History, Princefield, MD 

Brooke P. Brosious, Human Comm., Harrisonburg, VA 



Amy W. Brown, Psych., Staunton, VA 

Christopher C. Brown, Biology, Fairfax, VA 

Elvin Brown, Sociology, Floral Park, NY 

Jeremy W. Brown, History/Soc. Sci., Sabillasville, MD 

Joel M. Brown, English, Galax, VA 



Kimberly A. Brown, CIS, Forest, VA 

Laura A. Brown, Pub. Adm./Pol. Sci., Arlington, VA 

Melvin J. Brown, English, Colonial Beach, VA 

Natasha T. Brown, Mass Comm., Gordonsville, VA 

Nekea J. Brown, Int. Aff./French, Alexandria, VA 








<!? 










196 



Seniors 




■?*= 



Nicole A. Brown, Mktg, Richmond, VA 
Rachelle D. Brown, Mass Comm., Forest, VA 
Shelby A. Brown, Mass Comm., Williamsburg, VA 
Wendy C. Brown, Kinesiology, Carson, VA 
Anne C. Browning, Psych, ClenAllen VA 



Tabitha E. Broyles, Psych., Falmouth, VA 
L. Scott Bruggermann, Pol. Science, Va. Beach, VA 
Shari R. Bruton, Finance, Richmond, VA 
Allison N. Bryant, Pub. Relations, Potomac, MD 
Desiree Y. Bryant, Mass Comm., Frederick, MD 




lyiidiNiqhi MacIness 

Letting loose at i\\& s+k*ol<e o^ tw/elve 



At the end of the football sea- 
son, as the weather turned colder, 
another team of Dukes prepared 
for their yearly tradition. Mid- 
night Madness. NCAA rules 
strictly specified the date that col- 
lege basketball teams could begin 
practice. JMU chose to take ad- 
vantage of every minute by hold- 
ing the first basketball practice at 
midnight on the specified date, 
which fell on Halloween. 

Players and spectators 
used this opportunity to psych 
themselves up for basketball 
season. Parties were held off 
and on campus as students 
gathered beforehand and went 
to the convocation center ready 



to cheer on their favorite team. 
Alan Riddle and his apartment 
mates held a party before the 
festivities. "With Midnight 
Madness and Halloween on the 
same night, we didn't need 
another reason to party. Besides, 
we wanted to start the basket- 
ball season off right for our 
senior year." 

Students in costumes 
began arriving around 10:30. 
New this year was a laser light 
show. However, that was not 
the highlight of the evening. 
The students and fans were 
there to see the men's and 
women's basketball teams in 
action. The teams were intro- 



duced, followed by a scrimmage 
between the purple and gold 
men's teams. 

Midnight madness was 
a chance to see the new team in 
action. It highlighted key 
players and previewed new 
oness. Kareem Robinson and 
Darren McClinton demon- 
strated their talents, while 
players such as Jeff Chambers 
and Willie Davis showed their 
leadership on the court. Mid- 
night Madness began the season 
on a powerful note. The Dukes 
were ready for a winning 
season, and the fans were ready 
to cheer them to victory. 

-Kate Travers 




Jeannie Buckingham, Biology, Va. Beach, VA 
Jennifer L. Buckley, Psych., Harrisonburg, VA 
Stephanie Buersmeyer, Mathematics, Burke, VA 
Amy J. Bugenhagen, Finance, Winston-Salem, NC 
Jacqueline Bullock, Paint/Art Hist.,Harrisonburg,VA 



Marie A. Buntua, Pol. Sci. /English, Great Falls, VA 
Ken M. Buraker, Art, Culpeper, VA 
Harold D. Burch, Mathematics, Charlottesville, VA 
Julie M. Burgess, Fashion Mdse, Harrisonburg, VA 
Susan K. Burgess, Human Comm., Callao, VA 



Angela M. Burke, Public Rel., Charlottesville, VA 
Kelly P. Burke, History, Mechanicsville, VA 
Scott T. Burnett, History, Stuarts Draft, VA 
Jay C. Burnett, Pol. Science/ Mktg, South Boston, VA 
David B. Burns, Mathematics, Culpeper, VA 



Seniors I ^/ 



Julia E. Burns, Psychology, Covington, VA 

Derek A. Butler, Economics, Burke, VA 

Janice A. Butler, Gen. Studies, Emporia, VA 

Audrey L. Butts, Mktg, Portsmouth, VA 

Jeffrey H. Byers, CIS, Charlottesville, VA 



Angela D. Byrd, English, Martinsville, VA 

Christopher V. Byrd, Mktg, Centerport, NY 

Melanie L. Byrd, Psych., Va. Beach, VA 

Ana Calderon, Psych. /Ed., Springfield, VA 

Roland M. Calvert, Finance, Arlington, VA 



PeopIe Are Siill HAviNq Sex 



_p\n i^'\crease \y\ 

The "free love" years of 
the sexual revolution had 
definitely come and gone. The 
world was now in the midst of a 
completely different era, 
concerning itself with un- 
planned pregnancy, AIDS and 
other forms of sexually trans- 
mitted diseases. The questions 
and problems of sex in the 90's 
were ones with which students 
were continually confronted. 

The decision to have sex 
had become increasingly more 
difficult for students. They had 
a lot inore to lose knowing that 
sexually transmitted diseases 
run rampant on college cam- 
puses. Who wanted to risk 
contracting a deadly disease for 



awai^eKvess led to ynoy^e. resporvsibilfi+y 



a meaningless one night stand? 

For those choosing to 
have sex and wanting to do it 
safely, there were many campus 
programs to provide them with 
the information they needed. 
The Health Center provided 
extensive information on the 
topics of STD's and pregnancy 
prevention for any student 
needing it through programs 
and brochures. The Center 
strongly supported the nation- 
wide push for condom use as a 
means of prevention in both 
areas. 

AIDS Awareness Week 
during the month of October 
brought several guest speakers 
to campus lecturing on related 



topics. Programs in the resi- 
dence halls also gave students 
the information they needed for 
safer sex. 

Many students choos- 
ing to have sex did so because 
they were involved in a serious 
relationship. When students 
were committed to one another, 
they often chose a more per- 
sonal form of birth control, like 
the pill. 

Those deciding not to 
be sexually active may have 
chosen to do so for several 
reasons. Some felt they are not 
ready or they were waiting until 
marriage while others refrained 
from sex for religious reasons. 

-Beth Anne Howie 




Anne D. Campbell, Mktg, Richmond, VA 

William A. Campbell, Psych., Gaitherssburg, VA 

Aldo J. Canestrari, Kin., Orchard Park, NY 

Felicia R. Canipe, Psych., Warrenton, VA 

Claudine Caracciolo, Psych., Huntington, NY 



Jennifer L. Carbary, Int. Bus., Arlington, VA 

Derek R. Carbonneau, Comm., Harrisonburg, VA 

Heather E. Carbonneau, Art, Harrisonburg, VA 

Susan O. Garden, Pub. Rel., Winchester, VA 

Kathleen M. Cardile, Mktg, Gaithersburg, MD 



Martina M. Cardine, Nursing, Harrisonburg, VA 

Jennifer L. Carey, MCOM./Theatre, Fairfax, VA 

Christine E. Carlson, English, Alexandria, VA 

Sherry L. Carlton, Finance/French, Vienna, VA 

Gwen A. Carpenter, Finance, Moneta, VA 




198 



Seniors 



I 




Matthew J. Carpenter, Psych., Sylesville, MD 
Jeffrey A. Carriker, Finance, Burke, VA 
Marci J. Carscallen, Mass Comm., Stafford, VA 
Christine L. Carter, Finance, Hampstead, MD 
Marcus C. Carter, Soc. Science, Bremo Bluff, VA 



Wendi A. Carter, Speech Path., Charlottesville, VA 
J. Mark Cary, Pol. Science, Pacific Grove, CA 
Teresa A. Cash, Speech Path., Gloucester, VA 
Katharine L. Caterson, Mgt, Absecon, NJ 
Leslie A. Catts, Anthro., Middletown, DE 





CHOICES. The decision to have sex is a 
serious one in this day and age. The 
issues of pregnancy, STDs and rehgious 
values all affected students's choices. 



PREVENTION. In today's sexually 
aware society, couples found that using 
condoms was a good idea to prevent 
unwanted pregnancies and diseases. 




Priscilla R. Cavalca, Int. Affairs, Charlottesville, VA 
Samuel J. Cavaliere, Comp. Science, Stanhope, NJ 
Celestine L. Caviness, Biology, Seoul, Korea 
Barbara A. Cecchini, Dance, Staunton, VA 
Cheryl A. Cekada, Actg, Harrisonburg, VA 



Vincent A. Centofanti, Mass Comm., Eldersburg, MD 
Elaine M. Chapman, AIS, Winchester, VA 
Sherri L. Charity, CIS, Charles City, VA 
Matthew D. Charleston, Actg, Woodbridge, VA 
S. Ursula Chavez, English, Vienna, VA 



Tonya L. Cheek, English, Springfield, VA 
Lynette M. Chewning, Fine Arts, Va. Beach, VA 
Bunkye Chi, English, Springfield, VA 
Belinda D. Chilson, Speech Path., Corning, NY 
Allen E. Chin, Actg, Burke, VA 



Seniors \^^ 



Ann M. Christopher, Fash. Mdse., Harrisonburg, VA 

Krista D. Christy, Health Admin., Alexandria, VA 

Sandi L. Ciarlo, HRM, Wilmington,DE 

Daniel S. Ciatti, History, Fairfax Station, VA 

Jonas G. Cikotas, Finance, Alexandria, VA 



Ian A. Cillay, Mktg, Bethesda, MD 

Mark A. Cipolleti, Mass Comm., Richmond, VA 

Kenneth M. Clair, English, Cicely, AK 

Kevin A. Clark, CIS, Colonial Heights, VA 

John S. Clarke, Pol. Science, Fairfax, VA 









PUMPING IRON. Jacob Leelam and his 
big brother Randy Nutter work out at 
Nautilus. Excercising was one of many 
activities in which they participated. 



GHOSTBUSTERS. Two little brothers 
play at Lake Quake. The httle brothers 
enjoyed each others company as well as 
that of their big brothers. 




Lisa S. Clausen, Psych., Va. Beach, VA 

Tajuana 1. Clayton, Pol. Science, Montross, VA 

Keith M. Cleary, Actg, Lynbrock, NY 

Karen F. Clemmer, Biology, Goshen, VA 

Susan L. Clevenger, Int. Bus. Fredericksburg, VA 



William A. Coates, Mktg, Reston, VA 

Carlecia D. Cobbins, CIS, Yorktown, VA 

Kimberly E. Cochron, Mgt, Mt. Jackson, VA 

Michael S. Coffee, Pol. Science, Rockville, MD 

Gayle H. Cohen, Mass Comm., Martinsville, VA 



Amanda L. Cole, Human Comm., Burke, VA 

Bradford L. Cole, CIS, Derwood, MD 

Wendy R. Cole, Mktg, Franklin, VA 

Aileen S. Coles, Fash. Mdse., Harrisonburg, VA 

W. Hunter Collier, Psych., Va. Beach, VA 




200 Seniors 



I 




Michelle G. Collier, CIS, Burke, VA 
David L. Collins, Pol. Science, Roanoke, VA 
Holly A. Collins, Speech Path., Altevista, VA 
Drew E. Conard, Actg/Finance, Burnsville, MN 
Michael R. Conley, Music Comp., Yorktown, VA 



Windy C. Conner, Hth. Care Admin., Danville, VA 

Donald P. Conners, CIS, Glen Burnie, MD 

Julie M. Contos, Mktg, McLean, VA 

Susan E. Cook, Human Comm., Vienna, VA 

Marie S. Cooney, English, Alexandria, VA 




Mugin 

STUDLY. Ben See flexes as he jokes 
with his big brother. This program gave 
students a chance to get involved with 
younger friends. 



Biq BROihERS ancJ Biq SIsters 

3+udervfs dedicafe fKe,ir i\yv\& fo Kelpiiag otKe.»^s 



Do you remember 
having one person in your life 
who served as a role model and 
whom you really looked up to? 
Many of the children living in 
the Harrisonburg area are 
underprivileged and need a role 
model in their lives. Some JMU 
students have chosen to help fill 
up this void in local children's 
lives through the Big Brothers/ 
Big Sisters program. 

Students who became 
involved in the program first 
went through a lengthy applica- 
tion process to be sure they are 
matched with the best possible 
child. The application process 
was used to match students 



with children that had similar 
interests and hobbies. It was 
necesssary for students and 
children to be compatible 
because they would be together 
for two years. The long applica- 
tion was well worth it in the end 
because the the Big Brothers/ 
Big Sisters program proved to 
be rewarding for both the 
student and the child involved. 
The program required 
students to spend about five 
hours a week with the little 
brother/little sister. Many 
students gave up their limited 
free time on week-ends and 
spent vacations and holidays 
with their little brother or little 



sister. Activities they did 
together varied from renting a 
movie to helping with home- 
work. Grad student Harvey 
Powers said that he taught his 
little brother how to throw a 
football. 

Although the program 
was a big time commitment, it 
was one which students did not 
regret. Despite her busy sched- 
ule, Jennifer Horsely was glad 
she became a big sister. "The 
program gives me a good 
feeling because I have been so 
lucky. I get a chance to give 
back what I have to someone 
else who's disadvantaged." 

-Beth Anne Howie 




Alison N. Cooper, Psych., Va. Beach, VA 
Kristin L. Copeland, Psych., Annandale, VA 
James T. Copp, Finance, Mechanicsville, VA 
Randall W. Corbin, Kin., Roanoke, VA 
Charles S. Corprew, History, Va. Beach, VA 



Brian J. Correie, Mktg, Stephens City, VA 

Ericka S. Cotton, Mass Comm., Newport News, VA 

Lisa G. Cox, Speech Path. Roanoke, VA 

Christi M. Cozens, Mktg, Richmond, VA 

Lisa K. Crabbs, Psych. /Early Ed., Salem, VA 



Beth Crawford, Psych., Alexandria, VA 

Catherine R. Crider, Psych., Clifton, VA 

E. Branch Crockett, Mktg, Fairfax, VA 

Warren A. Crowder, Geography, Mechanicsville, VA 

Diana K. Crupi, Chemistry/ Biology, Califon, NJ 



Seniors 20 i 



Lisa L. Crutchfield, History/Anth., Va. Beach, VA 

Laura S. Culp, Geography, Harrisonburg, VA 

Wendy G. Cunningham, Econ., Harrisonburg, VA 

Prudence F. Cuper, EngHsh, CaUfon, NJ 

Tommi L. Curd, Sociology, Salem, VA 



Timothy J. Curtin, Mktg, Vienna, VA 

Patricia L. Daggett, Music, Warrenton, VA 

Christina M. Daley, Soc. Work, Wynnewood, PA 

Michael T. Damoth, Int. Affairs, Blue Ridge, VA 

Cynthia P. Dardine, English, Washington, D.C. 




h SEARch of Lost FuNds 



3tude^Afs go to ext 

Being a college student is often 
synonymous with being poor. As 
tuition costs increased, students 
were forced to pinch pennies even 
more. Despite the high costs of 
living, JMU students found ways 
to cut corners. 

Students living off campus 
found ways to cut costs by living 
in houses where the rent was 
cheap. "I pay only $155 a month 
so I save a lot of money there," 
said junior Zoe Anastas. They also 
lowered food costs by clipping 
coupons and eating plenty of 
pasta. Sophomore Dan Kaufman 
said, 'T live off of Ramen Noodles 
— eight packages for $1.00." 

For some students the food bill 



v-e.n\e-S to sti^etcK tkeii^ dollcik's c\v\a cents 



was nothing compared to their 
others, especially the phone bill. 
Students with a boy- or girlfriend 
managed to run up hefty bills as 
time passed . "I spend more money 
on my phone bill than 1 do on all 
my other bills put together," said 
sophomore Kristi Shackelford. 

Alcohol costs added up quickly 
and as always the answer was to 
drink cheap beer. "The Beast" was 
still the most popualr cheap beer. 
After a while, students got used to 
the taste. Some students actually 
admitted to liking it. Junior Grant 
Jerding said, "There's no such 
thing as bad beer." 

Although students watching 
their finances could not go out to 



eat very often, those with a meal 
contract could at least go to the 
Steakhouse. Who could complain 
about a steak dinner as a part of 
the meal plan? 

Students also saved money by 
seeing movies on campus rather 
than in theaters where the cost 
was almost $4.00 more. Movies 
arrived at Grafton-Stovall a few 
weeks after they played at regu- 
lar theatres, but the wait was 
worth it for money conscious stu- 
dents. 

If these tactics failed, students 
were sometimes forced to break 
down and call Mom and Dad col- 
lect to ask for more money! 

-Beth Anne Howie 



Alexander K. Darrough, Geography, Stafford, VA 

Angela E. Davis, History, Alexandria, VA 

Eric M. Davis, Psych., Waldorf, MD 

Michael F. Davis II, Graph. Design, Stafford,VA 

Raymond P. Dean, Accounting, Finksburg, MD 



Kristi A. Decker, Art Hist., Richmond, VA 

Patricia L. Delk, Pol. Science, Norfolk, VA 

Jeffrey W. Dellers, Mass Comm., Blacksburg, VA 

Priscilla A. Demeo, Soc. Work, Woodbridge, VA 

Heather L. Dennis, Int. Bus., New Milford, PA 



Kristine L. DePersia, Biology, Woodbridge, VA 

Amit M. Desai, Bio./Med. Tech.,Christiansburg, VA 

Katherine E. Desarno, MCOM. /English, Ocean, NJ 

Carrie A. Desmond, English, Bellport, NY 

Mark P. DeStefano, Comm/Eng., Silver Spring, MD 



2.02. Seniors 





Brian D. DiBartolo, Geog./ History, Hillsdale, NJ 
Michele B. Dickinson, Mgt, Livingston, N] 
Sara L. Didrickson, English, Midlothian, VA 
Mary T. Dimino, Mgt, Manassas, VA 
Uyen T. Dinh, History, Reston, VA 



Diane M. DiPalo, Psych., Middletown, NJ 
Christine L. DiTrani, Biology, River Vale, N] 
Robert M. DiTullio, Econ. /English, Vienna, VA 
Bernie R. Dombrowski, Mgt, Dale City, VA 
Kristen L. Domroe, Soc. Science, Mountainside, NJ 





NOTHING HERE, Chad Hogston looks 
for some food of substance. Living off 
campus had its disadvantages, such as 
never having a stocked refrigerator. 



MAKING CEMs l.nipU po^ket^are 
common during college years. Students 
often pinched pennies during the week 
to be able to go out on v^'eek-ends. 



Robert P. Dorr, Actg/CIS, Oakton, VA 

James P. Douglas, History, Covington, VA 

Noelle Douglas,Psych./Crim Just,Fredericksburg, VA 

W. Dave Douglas, Music Ind., Reston, VA 

Amy J. Douglass, Sociology, Harrisonburg, VA 



Tara D. Douglass, Sociology, Alexandria, VA 
Jennifer L. Downing, Actg., Nassawadox, VA 
Peter J. Doyle, Pol. Science, Smithtown, NY 
Carolyn L. Driesell, Psych., Harrisonburg, VA 
Janet L. Driscoll, Human Comm., Harrisonburg, VA 



Kevin Drummond, Human Comm., Ellicott City, MD 
Craig R. Dubois, Biology, Wheaton, MD 
Thomas V. Duff, Biology, Millboro, VA 
Anne E. Duke, English, Gaithersburg, MD 
Michele D. Dunbar, Sociology, Germantown, MD 



Seniors £20 J? 



Randall S. Dunn, History, Richmond, VA 

Veronica L. Dymond, Econ., Vienna, VA 

Joan M. Eaton, Nursing, Hampton, VA 

Douglas S. Echols, Mgt, Roanoke, VA 

Marilynne Eder, Human Comm., Annandale, VA 



Africa L. Edmonds, English, Va. Beach, VA 

James C. Edmonds, Psych., Falls Church, VA 

Aimee A. Edwards, Art, Charlottesville, VA 

David D. Elam, Art, Fairfax, VA 

Susan H. Elmore, Actg, Richmond, VA 



SWEET MUSIC. Daniel Robinson and 
Jon Pineda of Jonnie's Heritage 
entertains the crowd at Cool Aid. Local 
bands were one of the main attractions 
at Cool Aid. 



Giulfoyle 

KICK BACK. A WXJM staff member 
enjoys the sounds at Cool Aid. WXJM 
sponsored the event to benefit Mercy 
House. 



Shereen M. Elnahal, Actg, Midlothian, VA 

Peggy A. Errierson, English, Waynesboro, VA 

Jennifer L. English, Pub. Health/Ed., Moneta, VA 

Jennifer G. Erdman, English, Harrisonburg, VA 

Lisa A. Errico, Actg, Vienna, VA 



Matthew S. Ertel, Mus. Ind., McMurray, PA 

Mary Anne C. Estrella, Int. Bus., Norfolk, VA 

Camilla D. Eubanks, Nursing, Esmont, VA 

Anne L. Evans, English, Easton, MD 

Katherine E. Evans, Int. Affairs, Accomac, VA 



Keith E. Evans, Mktg, Richmond, VA 

Nathan T. Evans, CIS, Richmond, VA 

Thomas G. Evans, History, Midlothian, VA 

Vanessa M. Evans, Mktg, Richmond, VA 

Karin M. Eyrich, Sociology /English, Stafford, VA 



204^ Seniors 





Tara C. Falwell, Comm., Reston, VA 
Misti L. Fannin, Psych., Manassas, VA 
Jacqeline L. Farmer, Hth Science, Richmond, VA 
Tibbie A. Farnsworth, Great Falls, VA 
Lisa A. Farrar, Nursing, Roanoke, VA 



Anthony A. Fedullo, Sports Mgt, Harrisburg, VA 
Monica S. Feldman, Marketing, Va Beach, VA 
Anne E. Ferguson, Spanish, Rice, VA 
Barbara K. Ferguson, History, Fairfax, VA 
Eleanor A. Ferguson, Psych., Alexandria, VA 




Jaiyi^jn' foR ChARiiy 



For the past few years the 
American music industry has 
been characterized by its efforts 
to raise awareness of public is- 
sues such as homelessness. Ben- 
efit concerts around the globe, 
such as Live Aid, drew thousands 
of spectators and raised money to 
help homeless citizens, as well as 
those with terminal diseases such 
as AIDS and cancer. In the spirit 
of these efforts, WXJM sponsored 
Cool Aid in the spring of this past 
year. The concert benefitted 
Mercy House and raised over 
$2,000 to help homeless families 
in the Harrisonburg-Rockingham 
area. 



Despite the length of the 
event — it lasted eight hours — 
over 750 students came out and 
supported the cause. Students 
energetically danced to the music 
of local bands such as Cicada, The 
Dance Crashers, Succotosh, 
Johnnies' Heritage and The Dave 
Matthews' Band. "It was a great 
mixture of talent," commented 
Brian Belforte, percussionist for 
Johnnies' Heritage. "It gave 
people with different perspectives 
on music a chance to hear some- 
thing different than what they 
usually listen to." 

The concert offered more than 
music, however. Promotional 



items such as t-shirts and CDs 
were sold, as well as food and 
drinks. Intermission entertain- 
ment was provided by Cilia, 
JMU's improvisational acting 
troupe. The event also provided 
students with a sense of accom- 
plishment and fulfilment. As stu- 
dent Christian Munson stated, 
"The music, the people, just the 
party in general was incredible 
and what made it more so was 
knowing we were helping people 
out." 

-Cindy Scott 



twii/ft'i//c 




Gina L. Feria, Psyc, Harrisonburg, VA 
Stephen R. Fernandez, CIS., Harrisonburg, VA 
Gina N. Ferrigno, Hth. Fitness, Roanoke, VA 
Cara H. Feys, Int. Affairs, Rockville, MD 
Melinda R. Fields, Psyc, Oakton, VA 



Chanson E. Finney, Pol. Science, Fairfax, VA 
Lori E. Firestone, Pub. Admin., Warrenton, VA 
Amy S. Fitzgerald, Music Ind., Centerville, VA 
Sharon K. Fitzgerald, Nursing, Fairfield, VA 
John R. Fix, Geology, Redbank, NJ 



Scott C. Fleshman, Mathmatics, Beuna Vista, VA 
Eric S. Fleshood, English, Mechansville, VA 
Kenneth F. Flester, Music Ed., Whitestone, VA 
Ginger L. Flora, Management, Va Beach, VA 
Kelly D. Floyd, OSM, Lovingston, VA 



Seniors 2-05 



Connie E. Fontenot, Finance, Fredricksburg, VA 

Paul D. Forbes, History, Hempstead, NY 

Monyette L. Foreman, CIS, Richmond, VA 

Pamela A. Foreman, English, Chesterfield, VA 

Jayne E. Forrar, Psych., Shrewsburg, NJ 



Stephen S. Forrey, Finance, Lancaster, PA 

Jeffrey P. Fortescue, Mass Comm., Red Bank, NJ 

Cynthia B. Francis, Hth. Admin., Columbia, MD 

Elizabeth M. Francis, Fash. Mdse., Salisbury, MD 

William E. Freed, Finance/ Actg, Va Beach, VA 




Heores AncI HeroInes 



S+uden+s pat+e 

Everyone had their heroes. 
From atheletes to politicans to 
movie stars, there was usually 
someone that you admired from 
afar, looked up to or aspired to be 
like one day. Students often 
looked up to someone in their 
own field. Sarah Allen admired 
musical theatre star Michael 
Crawford for his "incredible 
voice," as well as his success in his 
career. "Micheal Crawford is my 
love god," said Sarah. "I want 
him to sing with me in my senior 
recital." Sarah owned most of 
Michael Crawford's CD's and also 
had his movies on tape. 

Others had hereos that had 
little to do with their choice of 
careers. Sports lovers could usu- 
allv list off the vital statistics of 



^*^A +Ke^rvselves aj+er 

their favorite player at the drop of 
thehat. Chris O'Donnell was such 
a fan of hockey player Eric 
Lindros. "1 admire Lindros for his 
awesome athletic ability. He also 
seems like a really nice guy, even 
though he's really famous and 
really rich." 

Some students admired those 
in the public eye. Greg Facchiano 
looked up to comedianDenis 
Leary because of his attitude and 
his openmindedness. "1 like this 
guy because he's so outspoken - 
he's not afraid to say what he 
wants to say, and he doesn't care 
what other people think," said 
Greg. 

A hero didn't have to be any- 
body famous. Students sometimes 
found role models in their own 



del: 



families. "I look up to my mom," 
said Colleen Magin. "She'sa nurse 
and I admire the way she has 
dedicated her life to helping 
people." Students also found he- 
roes in their communities, such as 
pastors or teachers. 

While some people thought 
heroes were a good influence, 
there were some that disagreed. 
"1 don't have any heroes, because 
1 think that they limit you," said 
sophomore Jeff Gothelf. "You 
shouldn't try to be anybody else; 
you should always be yourself." 

Heroes gave some students 
something to aspire towards. By 
patterning themselves after some- 
one else, students were able to 
better reach their own goals. 
-Kristi Shackelford 



SUCCESS. This executive for Wal-Mart 
was a role model for students. Sam 
Walton's success epitomized the goals olll 
most business students. 



Cameron M. Freeman, Soc. Science, Richmond, VA 

Cheryl L. Freeman, Marketing, McLean, VA 

Dana D. Freeman, Nursing, Crozet, VA 

Gina G. Freeman, Nursing, Timberville, VA 

Erika L. Freihage, Psych., Potomac, MD 



Kelly S. Friday, CIS, Lorton, VA 

Carolyn E. Friend, Fash. Mdse., Richmond, VA 

Lee M. Frost, Mass Comm., Va. Beach, VA 

Michelle M. Fruth, Psych., Va. Beach, VA 

Blessed C. Fuller, Speech Path., Hampton, VA 



Donna K. Fulmer, Soc. /Music Ed., Woodstock, VA 

Stacie J. Funk, Psych., Vienna, VA 

William T. Fylstra, Mgt, Kinnelon, NJ 

Frank T. Gadams, Finance, Richmond, VA 

Michelle L. Gallice, Biology, Herndon, VA 



2 O Seniors 





Erin E. Galvin, Int. Affairs, West Point, NY 
Margaret E. Gardner, Geography, Knoxville, TN 
Judith K. Garland, History/English, Springfield, VA 
Wendy J. Garpow, Economics, Tampa, PL 
Brendan R. Garrett, Music, Manheim, PA 



Amy L. Gartrell, Biology, Catonsville, MD 
Jonathan P. Gathright, Finance, Mechanicsville, VA 
Sarah-Jane Gatley, HCOM/ English, Falls Church, VA 
David A. Gaul, Chemistry, Sterling, VA 
Elissa J. Gellis, Org. Comm., Midlothian, VA 





PARTY ON! Wayne Campbell and 
Garth Algar serve as heroes to college 
students who enjoy a good laugh. The 
character's popularity soared when the 
movie Wayne's World as released. 



JAMES-CLOSE-UP. The statue otjames 
Madison outside of Carrier Library 
recieves a very close inspection. James 
Madison's integrety served as a basis for 
tradition at Madison. 




Mary Beth Gelven, Anthropology, Falls Church, VA 
Jennifer L. Gendron, Russian, Hampton, VA 
Karen R. Gerard, Art Hist., Chesapeake, VA 
Chanses R. Gianniny, CIS, Ruckersville, VA 
Mary M. Gibrall, Finance, Richmond, VA 



Beth N. Gibson, History, Manassas, VA 

Joseph M. Gibson, Philosophy, Harrisonburg, VA 

Jeffrey C. Gies, Mktg., Hampton, NH 

Jennifer Gillespie, Soc. Sci. /History, Woodbridge, VA 

Lori M. Gilliam, History, Richmond, VA 



David J. Glassbrook, Mgt, Pittsford, NY 
Catherine A. Glembocki, Actg, McLean, VA 
Douglas I. Glickman, Actg, Baltimore, MD 
Tiffany J. Gobbi, English, Herndon, VA 
Jason L. Gochenour, Kin., Luray, VA 



Seniors 2.0~Z 



Leslie A. Godley, Int. Affairs, Yorktown, VA 

Frank M. Goetz, Mktg, W. Hartford, CT 

Sharon R. Goff, Fash. Mdse., Richmond, VA 

Fernando Gomez, Comp. Science, Alexandria, VA 

Maritess Gor\zales, HCOM, Fredericksburg, VA 



David J. Good, Pol. Science, Charlottesville, VA 

Lesa D. Goodman, English, Montpelier, VA 

Theresa G. Goodwin, Actg, Culpeper, VA 

Robert A. Gordick, CIS, Newport News, VA 

Jennifer A. Gorman, Int. Bus., Newport News, VA 




[^"!^ 





Christopher M. Gowen, Biology, Lynchburg, VA 

Charis L. Graeser, Psych., Chester, VA 

Mary Lynn Grammer, Mktg, Disputanta, VA 

Maria I.L. Granados, Int. Bus., McLean, VA 

Sandra K. Grantham, Actg, Dale City, VA 



Kevin W. Graves, Soci./Pol.Science, Crozet, VA 

Angela E. Gray, Fash. Mdse., Hampton, VA 

Catherine A. Gray, Pol. Science, Alexandria, VA 

Craig W. Greener, Finance, Flourtown, PA 

William ]. Greenhalgh, Soc. Sci., Mechanicsville, VA 



2.03 Seniors 




Jennifer R. Gregorio, Music Ed., Va. Beach, VA 
Stacie L. Gregory, CIS, Prince George, VA 
Andrew R. Greis, Math /History, Burdett, NY 
EUzabeth Griffin,Sp. Path./ Audio,Mechanicsville, VA 
Margaret K. Grogan, Chemistry, Richmond, VA 



Lauri M. Grooms, Pol. Sci./Soci., Trevilians, VA 
Jennifer M. Grossman, EngHsh, Southbury, CT 
Tracey V. Guise, HeaUh Science, Lynchburg, VA 
Michelle R. Gurile, Health Science, Pataskala, OH 
Adam R. Gutterman, Philosophy, Norfolk, VA 



Wrf^^!") I 




Fun For All AqEs 



P'u^*ceII P*arl< gave students a p\c\(ze- to be a kid 




Purcell Park had a 
special meaning to most every- 
one who lived in Harrisonburg. 
Different people found different 
meanings in the park and it met 
the demands placed upon it. 

The rolling hills and 
soft gravel path lent itself to the 
runners who used it to log their 
miles. Senior Michael Jakaitis 
said, "I enjoy running at Purcell 
Park because of the beautiful 
scenery. Plus I like seeing all of 
the kids playing. It reminds me 
of the fun times I had as a kid." 

A main attraction of 
Purcell Park was Kid's Castle. 
Neighborhood parents could 
take their kids there and watch 
them play. Kids could play 



with their friends and enter the 
realm of the imagination as 
kings and queens ruled their 
domain. Not only 
Harrisonburg youth took 
advantage of the castle; many 
JMU students could be seen 
playing on the various swings 
and other obstacles there. 

The park also served 
other purposes. Local youth 
football games, IPC football. 
Alpha Chi Omega's Frisbee 
Fling and various other club 
sponsored activities took place 
there. It was also a popular spot 
for picnics, walks or a friendly 
game of tennis. Senior Randy 
Corbin said, "I find the park to 
be very romantic. I enjoy taking 



e a Kia again 
dates there as it is a quiet place 
to talk. It's also good for late 
night walks." 

A final aspect of the 
park was that it united JMU 
students and the Harrisonburg 
community. It was a place 
where the two could meet on 
common ground and enjoy 
common activities. There was a 
sense of pride from all in the 
park. As senior Doug Campbell 
remarked, "Purcell Park is 
unique in that it brings together 
students and local residents in a 
relaxed atmosphere. Although 
we don't mingle much, there is 
an awareness of the other's 
lifestyle." 

- Rob Singer 



H. Jordan Hague, Mgt, Charlottesville, VA 
Karen E. Haines, Psych., Great Falls, VA 
Nicole M. Hajj, Int. Bus., Piano, TX 
John W. Haley, Mass Comm., Fairfax, VA 
Courtney A. Hall, Psych., Fairfax, VA 



Monique L. Hall, Speech Path., Harrisonburg, VA 
Rosetta Halm, Nursing, Alexandria, VA 
Deborah L. Halterman, Pol.Science, Monterey, VA 
Cheryl D. Hamilton, Comp. Science, Roanoke, VA 
Sara N. Hammel, Mass Comm., Sudbury, MA 



Anneliese L. Hancock, French, Reston, VA 
Stephanie L. Hannum, Mass Comm., Jefferson, MD 
Cathryn J. Hansen, Speech Path., Portsmouth, VA 
Trendee E. Harding, Econ., Arlington, VA 
Kristen M. Hargett, Span. /Russian, Chesterfield, VA 



Seniors 209 



Alison L. Harris, Pol. Science, Laurel, MD 

Annette Y. Harris, Mktg, Lorton, VA 

Julie N. Harris, Social Work, Stuarts Draft, VA 

Sonja A. Harris, OSM, Dillwyn, VA 

Yolanda M. Harris, OSM, Lynchburg, VA 



Deborah A. Harrison, Actg, Portsmouth, VA 

Gina L. Harrison, Nursing, Broadway, VA 

Marv Catherine Hart, History, Alexandria, VA 

John C. Hash 11, Actg, Bluefield, VA 

Deana K. Hawkins, Hth. Science, Woodstock, VA 




MaII CaU 



■f-lopej-ul S+udervfs (SKecked JV\a\\ Oj+erv 



Some people did it once a 
day. Others were known to do it 
twice or even three times in one 
day. Whether after meals or be- 
tween classes, people are always 
making trips to the post office in 
hopes of finding their mailboxes 
filled with letters from friends 
and family. 

For many though, especially 
upperclassmen, that was a rare 
treat. Junior Ann Hart said she 
has been getting less and less 
mail over the years. "I definitely 
got more mail as a freshman," 
said Hart. For her as well as a lot 
of others, mail from home de- 
creased as JMU mail, flyers and 
junk mail increased. 

When students returned from 



summer vacation this year, they 
were greeted by a new and im- 
proved post office resulting from 
the expansion of the Warren 
Campus Center. Among the 
renovations were new purple 
furniture and carpeting and an 
additional wall of mailboxes. 

Students who had multiple 
box mates hoped the increased 
spaced would ease the over- 
crowding of boxes. For some 
there were not enough new boxes 
to balance the increase in enroll- 
ment. "There are now four people 
sharing my P.O. box when there 
used to be only two," said Hart. 
Some things never change! 

-Rebecca Haile 




CHIT CHAT. Angela Pino and Kim 
Williams take a break from their busy 
schedules to relax in the renovated 
Campus Center. 



LETTERS AND BILLS. Edgar Trott 
sorts through his personal mail. 
Students found themselves checking 
their boxes frequently. 



Geni 1. Hawkins, Mgt/Psych., Harrisonburg, VA 

Christopher D. Haws, Psych., Norfolk, VA 

Scott K. Hawthorne, Pol. Science, Woodbridge, VA 

Elizabeth B. Hayes, English/ Psych., Rockville, VA 

Michael Hayton, Human Comm., Falls Church, VA 



Kirk R. Hazelgrove, Biology, Va. Beach, VA 

Jennifer A. Heard, Pol. Science, Richmond, VA 

Kristine N. Hee, Mathematics, Herndon, VA 

Frank G. Heisler, Finance, Centreville, VA 

Dana G. Heller, Psychology, Gaithersburg, MD 



Suzanne J. Henderson, Biology, Richmond, VA 

Kathleen 1. Henretta, Soc. Work/Sociol., Roanoke, VA 

Lee A. Herbert, Comm., Harrisonburg, VA 

Rachelle A. Herndon, Hth. Science, Rustburg, VA 

Sarah T. Herrick, Int. Bus., Richmond, VA 



^\\J Seniors 





Cherri M. Hess, Speech Path., Chesterfield, VA 
Christopher Hess, Art/Graph.Des., Nags Head, NC 
Deanne L. Heyer, Psych., Greenbelt, MD 
Joseph E. Hicks, History, Fredericksburg, VA 
Denise Higgins, Psych., Goodview, VA 



Laura M. Hilbert, English, Woodbury Hts., NJ 
Hope L. Hill, Soc. Science, Prince George, VA 
Roberta E. Hill, English, Piney River, VA 
Hannah K. Hinely, Psych., Decatur, GA 
Mari S. Hines, Psych., Grantville, GA 




RIDING THROUGH. David Mangum 
was in such a hurry to retrieve his mail 
that he decided to ride his bike into the 
Campus Center. 

CARE PACKAGES. Janice Quick 
retrieves a package for a student. 
Students look forward to receivirmg the 
purple slips in their P.O. boxes. 




Sheryl A. Hines, English/Pub. Rel., Montpelier, VA 
Stephen P. Hinz, CIS, Fairfax Station, VA 
L. Nichole Hitchings, Fash. Mdse., Va. Beach, VA 
Hope E. Hodsdon, Kin., Chesapeake, VA 
Kristen G. Hoffman, English, Fairfax, VA 



Karen M. Hoke, Hth. Science /Biology, Herndon, VA 
David C. Holloway 111, Mktg, Wayne, PA 
Kristen C. Holmquist, Int. Affairs, Reston, VA 
Kathryn M. Holt, Psych., Lynchburg, VA 
Karen E. Honaker, Hth. Science, Oakton, VA 



Marcy Honnold, Int. Affairs/Spanish, Highlands, NJ 
Karen F. Hope, Pol. Science, Purcellville, VA 
Dawn M. Hoppe, English, Norfolk, VA 
Jennifer T. Horan, HRM, Richmond, VA 
Ronald E. Horton, English, Richmond, VA 



Seniors 2 i i 



Amy B. Howard, Biology, Lancaster, PA 

Elizabeth G. Howard, Actg, Newport News, VA 

M. Etta Howard, Socio. /ECED, Harrisonburg, VA 

Debra E. Howell, Econ., Columbia, MD 

Shari A. Howlett, Psych., Stafford, VA 



Thomas H. Howze, Geography, Blacksburg, VA 

Cynthia L. Hoyle, Biology, Round Hill, VA 

Christopher Hubbard, Fin. /Int. Bus., Culpeper, VA 

John S. Hudgins, Mgt/CIS, Charlottesville, VA 

Brandi L. Hudson, Mass Comm., Mobile, AL 





Donna K. Hudson, Psych., Rockville, VA 

Jeffrey S. Huffman, Finance, Waynesboro, VA 

Patrick C. Huffman, Hth. Science, Harrisonburg, VA 

Susan E. Huffman, Human Comm.,Harrisonburg, VA 

Sarah M. Hufnagel, Int. Bus. /French, Warrenton, VA 



Carron B. Hughes, Psych., Harrisonburg, VA 

Sheila Hughes, Psych., Farmville, VA 

Shari L. Hulin, Psych./Ed., Va. Beach, VA 

Patra S. Hull, Nursing, Staunton, VA 

Laura K. Hulsey, Speech Path., Oxford, NC 



E. Vasha Hunt, Comm., Mechanicsville, VA 

Paul H. Hunter, Biology, Great Falls, VA 

Jeffrey N. Hurst, Soc. Sci. /History, Richlands, VA 

Thomas J. Hynds Jr., Hth. Science, Glen Ridge, NJ 

Robert D. Im, Pol. Science, Fairfax Station, VA 



2 I 2 Seniors 




Jennifer A. Ingulli, Music, Stony Brook, NY 
Marcia L. Irvine, Math/Sec. Ed., Glasgow, VA 
Joseph D. Jaap Jr., Finance, Norfolk, VA 
Mary S. Jablonsky, Biology, Va Beach, VA 
Jennifer A. Jabs, Kin., Avon, NY 



Erica A. Jackson, HRM, Richmond, VA 
Karen L. Jackson, Mktg, Lynchburg, VA 
Niki L. Jackson, Pub. Admin., Woodbridge, VA 
Steven M. Jackson, Soc. Science, Winchester, VA 
Willem J. Jager, Int. Bus., Netherlands 




TfiE Doq Ate My HoiviEWORk... 

3+ucleKv+s would try cxny excuse to s+ay out o^ ff^ouble 



"I can't take the exam at 4:30, 
my ride is leaving at 3 o'clock." "I 
finished my paper last night, but 
something happened to my 
printer." "I tried to call, but your 
machine wasn't on." We've all 
either heard or said the things 
ourselves. The life of a college 
student couldn't be complete 
without excuses. 

Missing assignments fre- 
quently called for excuses. A pa- 
per that was put off for too long or 
a homework that was forgotten 
all together left students with only 
two alternatives: the absolute 
truth and probably a failing grade 
or a "white lie" and hope of pass- 



ing- 
Some students, however, de- 
cided that the truth was the best 
course of action. "When I forgot 
to turn in my take-home quiz, I 
went to my teacher and told him 
the truth. He was very under- 
standing," said sophomore Sarah 
Allen. 

Students that did have real rea- 
sons for problems sometimes 
found their teachers to be less than 
understanding. "So many people 
lie about stuff like having to go 
home for a fainily emergency that 
when it does really happen, your 
teachers don't believe you," said 
junior Andrea Bryant. "It's really 



not fair." 

Excuses were not reserved ex- 
clusively for school work. Jobs, 
missed appointments and vari- 
ous other minor details caused 
students to come up with excuses 
to save face. "I used to never call 
into work sick," said senior Chris 
Hulvey. "Now I do it all the time 
if I don't feel like working." 

Good or bad, excuses seemed 
to be a necessary part of surviv- 
ing college life. If they worked, 
excuses could be called lifesav- 
ers. On the occassions that they 
didn't, there was probably a re- 
ally good reason... 

-Kristi Shackelford 




Kerry A. Jakubowski, Sociology, Arlington, VA 
Beth M. Jamerson, Mktg, Harrisonburg, VA 
Kimberly L. Janik, Nursing, Herndon, VA 
Francine N. Janz, English, Denville, NJ 
Ignaz R. Jarbadan, Sociology, Fairfax Station, VA 



Rebecca L. Jarvis, English/Ed., Natural Bridge, VA 
Calay A. Jaynes, Art, Pittsburgh, PA 
Resha Jeneby, Pol. Science, McLean, VA 
Tonya R. Jernigan, Nursing, Roanoke, VA 
Kristine S. Jessen, Pub. Admin., Carmel, IN 



Shaby John, Actg./ Finance, Kerma, India 
Alease R. Johnson, Mgt, Richmond, VA 
Faith F. Johnson, Human Comm., Staunton, VA 
Kara A. Johnson, Music Ed., Vinton, VA 
Kelly A. Johnson, Psych., Annandale, VA 



Seniors 



213 



Patrice R. Johnson, Mgt, Richmond, VA 

Robert S. Johnson, Comm., Suffolk, VA 

Anita T. Jones, Pol. Science, Chesapeake, VA 

Charles E. Jones, Economics, Richmond, VA 

Karen D. Jones, Finance, Herndon, VA 



Norman R. Jones Jr., Biology, Harrisonburg, VA 

Michelle Joyce, Speech Path., Newport News, VA 

Nicki D. Joynes, Sociology, Troutville, VA 

Amy L. Judd, Anthro., Avon, CT 

Jennifer K. Juliano, Mktg, Nissequogue, NY 




TIhe OnIy PIace To S^^op 



S+udeKv+s spe-nci 

With a new look, the 
addition of Wal-Mart and over 
50 stores. Valley Mall provided 
students with a place to do their 
shopping and get away from 
the school scene. The only mall 
in Harrisonburg, it was a 
popular destination for JMU 
students. 

Despite its small size. 
Valley Mall boasted a variety of 
shops and stores. These in- 
cluded clothing and music 
stores, specailty shops and large 
department stores like Watsons 
and Leggetts. 

The changes in the mall 
also attracted students. "I'm 
really glad that Wal-Mart is 



+Kei^* spare V\n\e- at 

attached to the mall now," said 
sophomore Erin Roche. "That 
way I only have to take the bus 
to one place to do most of my 
shopping, which is really 
convienient." The bus sched- 
uled stops at three mall en- 
trances as well as Wal-Mart. 

The new food court was 
an important aspect of the 
mall's popularity. The variety 
made the mall a popular choice 
for students that wanted to 
avoid eating on campus. "My 
roommates and 1 never want the 
same thing for dinner," said 
Sarah Allen, "so we go to the 
mall. Personally, 1 prefer Dairy 
Queen." Students that wanted a 



fKe Valley Mail 

home-cooked meal could 
choose Country Kitchen . "My 
God the line was long," said 
Tiffani Gobbi. "It must be 
good." 

Not all students went to 
the mall just to shop and eat. 
For some, the mall was an 
employment opportunity. "I 
worked at Musicland a couple 
of hours a week to earn a little 
extra money," said Jeff Gothelf. 
"It's worth it just to get the 
discount on stuff I buy there." 

The Valley Mall was a 
place for students to escape the 
grind of homework and classes 
as well as spend their money. 

-Colleen Magin 




Manzo 

A NEW LOOK. Valley Mall gets a face- 
lift and a new addition. The remodeling 
gave the mall a larger food court and a 
passageway to Wal-Mart. 



Christina H. Jung, Int. Bus., Newport News, VA 

Angela M. Justis, Psych., Harrisonburg, VA 

Peter B. Kahn, Econ., Fairfax, VA 

Barbara A. Kamm, Actg, Centreville, VA 

Jeffrey L. Kane, AIS, Crofton, MD 



Allison R. Kaplowitz, Psych., Annandale, VA 

Bernard J. Karam II, Mgt, Chantilly, VA 

Amir Ali Karbassi, Int. Bus., Burke, VA 

Marcus P. Katabian, Mgt, Va. Beach, VA 

Deborah M. Katz, Mass Comm., Poquoson, VA 



Lori B. Katz, Mass Comm., Richmond, VA 

Michael E. Keatts, Mass Comm., Midlothian, VA 

Heather Keene, Psych. /Speech Path., Norwell, MA 

Stephanie Keffer, Human Comm., Mechanicsville, VA 

Laura E. Kellard, Psych., Centreville, VA 



2.\^ Seniors 





Mandy L. Keller, Mktg, Woodbridge, VA 
Sheila A. Kelly, Int. Affairs/Spanish, Camp Hill, PA 
Susan D. Kemmer, English, Richmond, VA 
Christopher B. Kempton, Psych., Richmond, VA 
Julie A. Kennedy, Psych., Dumfries, VA 



Jennifer L. Kephart, Speech Path., Horseheads, NY 
Richard C. Kern III, Human Comm., Westchester, PA 
David C. Kerr, Actg, Winchester, VA 
Andrew Kilinski, Comp. Science, Harrisonburg, VA 
David E. Killian, Psych., Richmond, VA 





JUST BROWSING. These students stop 
to take a look at the new arrivals in 
Musicland. The music store 
wasfrequented by many students. 



Mauzo 

SCHOOL SPIRIT. The Mark-It shows its 
support for the Dukes with their display 
in the Mall. This store was a favorite for 
students who wanted school sweatshirts 
and Greek letters. 



Lisa M.J. Kim, Psych., Vienna, VA 
Christopher S. Kimmitz, Spanish, Falmouth, VA 
Karen E. Kimsey, Soc. Work, Tappahannock, VA 
John A. King, Anthro./Pol. Science, Burkeville, VA 
Kevin R. King, Biology, Dumfries, VA 



Patricia M. Kinney, Soc. Science, Va. Beach, VA 
Thomas A. Kirk, English, Roanoke, VA 
Paula S. Kish, Psych., Woodford, VA 
Kevin R. Kittrell, Biology, Yorktown, VA 
Corey F. Kitzke, Anthropology, Delmont, PA 



Brian W. Klapac, Geography, ChevyChase, MD 
Gregory P. Klebes, CIS, Rochester, NY 
Chris J. Klingel, Mktg/POM, Centreville, VA 
Cindy M. Klopotek, Mktg, Alexandria, VA 
Katherine L. Knowles, Biology, Harrisonburg, VA 



Seniors 2^5 



1 



Jeffrey M. Koch, Actg, Amherst, NY 

Jennifer L. Kohut, Mgt, Fairfax Station, VA 

Christian J. Kolar, Int. Affairs, McLean, VA 

George W. Koonce, Mass Comm., Hampton, VA 

Meaghan Koontz, Pol. Science, Bowie, MD 



Sean R. Koren, Mgt, Harrisonburg, VA 

Joseph M. Kornik, Mass Comm. /English, Folson, PA 

Ke\'in Kosakowski, English, Richmond, VA 

Natalie M. Kost, HRM, Falls Church, VA 

Donna M. Kostrub, Mass Comm., New Market, VA 




ShAky GrouncJ 

5fudeK\fs pcvK'ticipafe \n gauges ana acfivities ai Lake Ouake 



The day before Reading day 
was usually spent watching the 
clock during that last class and 
partying after it was all done. 
But the Lakeside Residence Ad- 
yisors (RA's), hall directors and 
some yolunteer residents were 
busy preparing for the first an- 
nual Lake Quake. This new and 
exciting eyent was eagerly an- 
ticipated by all and residents of 
the Lakeside Dorms were curi- 
ous to see what Lake Quake 
would bring to their backyard . A 
unique celebration, these stu- 
dents gathered to create some- 
thing entirely foreign to the cam- 
pus. In the area behind Eagle 
and Shorts Halls, next to 
Newman Lake, students were 



in\ited to release some stress and 
enjoy a day in the sun. The entire 
eyent benefiteci Big Brothers /Big 
Sisters and many students 
brought their little friends along 
to enjoy the fun as well. 

"It was a great surprise to find 
this party going on when 1 got 
home," said sophomore Katie Riy- 
ers. You could hear the "quake" 
before you saw it. WXJM spon- 
sored yarious bands for the eyent 
with Sweryyn' Meryyn as master 
of ceremonies. Mother Nature 
proyided warm weather. Some 
people took their studying out- 
side by Newman Lake to soak up 
some rays. Some RA's and even 
Hall Directors were quickly 
cooled off in the dunking booth. 



courtesy of yengeful residents. 
The old and young alike jumped 
around until they were out of 
breath on the moon bounce. 
Food, drinks and cotton candy 
were also sold, and souyenir T- 
shirts went fast. Sponsors of the 
eyent, WXJM, the Office of Resi- 
dence Life, Inter-Hall Council, 
Kroger, Sky Yogurt and others, 
were mentioned on the shirt de- 
signed by Laughing Dog. 

The day was filled with fun 
and frolicking. It seemed to be a 
great success and the only com- 
plaints were that it was oyer too 
soon. Eyeryoneinyolyed seemed 
anxious to repeat the day of sun, 
fun and companionship. 
-Erin Roche 




Magin 



DUNK THE DUDE. Chris Howard 
cringes as one of his residents hits the 
target and dunks him. Many of the 
lakeside RA's sat in the dunking booth 
as their residents took shots at them. 



Kathy Koumarianos, Dietetics, Seaside Park, NJ 

Gina M. Kraav, Sociology/Math, Herndon, VA 

Michele D. Krause, Hth Science, Harrisonburg, VA 

Edward R. Kremer, Pol. Science, Winchester, VA 

Troy L. Krepp, Mgt, Chester, VA 



Andrew W. Kudrick, Mgt/Mktg, Conestova, PA 

Chuck E. Kulas, CIS, Herndon, VA 

Manju S. Kurian, Pol. Sci./ English, Alexandria, VA 

Scott A. Kurtz, Mass Comm., Gaithersburg, MD 

Alina R. Kutner, Speech Path., Richmond, VA 



Michelle M. Labik, Int. Bus. /Finance, Lansdale, PA 

Maureen E. Lacy, Health Science, Baltimore, MD 

Suzanne M. Lattey, Mktg., Miller Place, NY 

Suzanne K. Lakes, Psych., Charlottesyille, VA 

Michael A. Lam, Computer Science, Elkton, VA 



216 





f ^£ < 




iL ^ 



Seniors 





Dawn A. Landes, Sociology, Mechanicsville, VA 

Brian J. Lane, Chemistry, Stafford, VA 

David J. Lane, AIS, Dallastown, PA 

Katherine Lane,Human Comm.,Highland Springs,VA 

Krista M. Langheim, Psych., Salem, VA 



Scott D. Lanouette, CIS, Chantilly, VA 

Elizabeth H. Large, Psych., Richmond, VA 

Melisa C. Larson, History/Pol. Science, Herndon, VA 

Julie E. Laske, Art Ed., Poquoson, VA 

Heidi E. Lasmanis, Speech Path., Crownsville, MD 




Mngin 

HELPING OUT. Eagle Hall residents 
Heather Jones and Katie Kenyon lend a 
helping hand at the Lake Quake by 
selling tickets to students. 



Magiii 




Karen E. Latnik, CIS, Alexandria, VA 

Nicole C. Laux, CIS, Colonial Heights, VA 

Christopher S. Lawing, Hotel-Rest. Mgt, Burke, VA 

Christine A. Lawler, Actg, Chester, NJ 

Meloney K. Layman, Music Ed., Waynesboro, VA 



Tricia R. Lazarchic, CIS/Mgt, Richmond, VA 

Uyen T. Le, Living Sciences, Springfield, VA 

Amy E. Leary, English, Fairfax, VA 

Janet C. Lee, CIS, Sandston, VA 

Tina-Sui J. Lee, Speech Path., Saddle Brook, NJ 



Alina Z. Legeckis, English, Silver Spring, MD 

Lori M. Lenskold, Int. Bus. /German, Flemington, NJ 

Gina M. Levar, Biology, Burke, VA 

Eric J. Levitt, Pol. Science, Florham Park, NJ 

Kevin D. Lewis, Music Ed., Martinsville, VA 



Seniors 2u I / 



Mary C. Lewis, History, Scottsburg, VA 

Allison P. Liggett, English, Lovettsville, VA 

Brett J. Link, History, Arlington, VA 

Charles D. Lionberger, Mass Comm., Salem, VA 

Amy S. Lisnyk, Art, Alexandria, VA 



Bridget C. Little, English, Gettysburg, PA 

Kara A. Livolsi, East NorthPort, NJ 

Christina M. Locher, HRM, Basye, VA 

Amy L. Loder, Psych., Lynchburg, VA 

Lisa L. Loftin, Pub. Admin./Pol. Sci., Richmond, VA 



A DIFFERENT VIEW. A slightly 
distorted look at the new Mr. Chips. The 
store boasted all new fixtures and 
stands as well as a new location near the 
village area. 



CONVIENIENT SHOPPING. These 
JMU students enjoy the easy axcess to 
shopping offered by Mr. Chips. 
Upperclassmen had to get used to Mr. 
Chip's move from Gibbons Hall. 



Wayne J. Lomicky, Math, Middletown, NJ 

Denise A. Long, Mktg, Petersburg, VA 

Marjorie J. Lotfi, English, Potomac, MD 

Beth A. Lotts, Psych., Greenville, VA 

Janice Lourie, CIS, Culpeper, VA 



Kevin M. Louth, Geology, Richmond, VA 

Sharon K. Lovering, Mass Comm., Arlington, VA 

Michele Lum, Mass Comm. /Dance, Selangor,Malay 

Elizabeth C. Lusk, English, Richmond, VA 

Allyson L. Luttrell, Psych., Winchester, VA 



Karlene M. Lydic, Pol. Science, Fairfax, VA 

Susan J. Lyles, Int. Bus., Hagerstown, MD 

Karen A. Lynch, ECED, Midland Park, NJ 

Mirraflor B. Macalindong, CIS/ POM, Norfolk, VA 

Heather J. MacArthur, Mktg, Fairfield, CT 



2.10 Seniors 





Tammy L. Mackert, Mktg, Enola, PA 

Jean R. Maddrea, Mktg, Yorktown, VA 

Shari L. Maddy, Mktg, Dublin, VA 

Alana J. Mahdalik, Dance/Econ., Stafford Springs, CT 

Loi D. Mai, Finance/CIS, Arlington, VA 



Hill C. Mallory III, History /Pol. Science, Ashland, VA 
Thomas M. Manning, Mktg, Martinsville, VA 
Mikael P. Manoukian, Mgt, Arlington, VA 
Vanessa Manson, Mass Comm., Gridgewater, VA 
Melanie A. Marcinkiewicz, Actg, Walkersville, MD 




Manzo 

JGHT READING. This student 
earches through the selection for the 
perfect card. Mr. Chips offered a wide 
election of greeting cards in addition to 
ther goods. 



ThE On Campus Coi\VENiEi\CE 

3+udervts KKvake tKe vr\os\ oj- yVl'stei^ (SKips 



Mister Chips, the 7-11 of JMU, 
kept students happy by provid- 
ing the essentials, while still main- 
taining each student's sugar fix. 

For students returning to JMU, 
many were surprised to see that 
Mr. Chips had moved over to 
where the police station once was. 
For people in the Village it was a 
pleasant change, but for many up- 
perclassmen that occupied the 
Bluestones, it was an inconve- 
nience. "It's such a pain to walk 
down all the way over to the new 
store," commented junior Kristen 
Snyder. "D-Hall was a great place 
to have Mr. Chips, because it was 
in the middle of everything." 



Mr. Chips offered a wide vari- 
ety of edible goodies while offer- 
ing a number of other items, such 
as paper products, school materi- 
als and greeting cards. With such 
diversity, it wasn't hard to see 
why Mr. Chips was the hub for 
many students shopping needs. 

"Mr. Chips is a great place to 
get a cup of hot chocolate on those 
cold winter nights," said cadet 
Allen Riddle. Many of JMU's ca- 
dets would go into Mr. Chips for 
some goodies, as well as relief 
from the cold. 

An added bonus to JMU's con- 
venience store was their supply 
of gifts forspecialneeds. For some- 



one who was sick, one could buy 
a get well balloon, as well as a 
card. For lovers, Mr. Chips al- 
ways had a supply of flowers 
handy, just in case they were 
needed. 

Mr. Chips provided a great 
service to JMU. By supplying es- 
sential goods with extra treats, 
Mr. Chips made campus life just a 
little easier. 

-Joe Olson 




Jennifer G. Marcinko, Human Comm., Scottsville, VA 
Kathleen S. Marco, English, Ballston Lake, NY 
Kenneth L. Marcus, Mktg, Springfield, VA 
' LeeAnne Marinaccio,Hth. Fit. /Promo., St. Charles, IL 
Christian A. Markow, English, Richmond, VA 



Lisa M. Marshall, English, Bealeton, VA 
Paul A. Marshall, Mgt, Bealeton, VA 
Dana C. Martin, Psych., Richmond,VA 
LaTrese Y. Martin, Psych., Hampton, VA 
Mona L. Martin, Comm., Martinsville, VA 



Stephen T. Martin, Econ./ Psych., Troutville, VA 
Elizabeth P. Mason, Psych., McLean, VA 
David C. Matthews, Pol. Science, Vienna, VA 
Leslee R. Matthews, English, Bena, VA 
Mary C. Mavor, Mktg/ Liv. Science, Waverly, VA 



Seniors ^ ^ y 



Virginia E. Mawyer, English, Gordonsville, VA 

Christopher F. Maxwell, Comp. Sci., Richmond, VA 

Shannon V. May, Sociology, Burke, VA 

Michele L. Mayo, Dietetics, Harrisonburg, VA 

Nancy E. Mayo, Anth., Suffolk, VA 



Catherine A. Mays, Comp. Sci., Madison Hgts., VA 

Van M. McAdoo, OSM/Bus. Ed., Hampton, VA 

Katherine L. McAfee, History, Vienna, VA 

Anne M. McCarthy, Psych., Arlington, VA 

Cherie McClellan, Sp. Path/Audio, Woodbridge, VA 




EducATORs of ihE Future 



Those JMU students who were 
involved in the education pro- 
gram had a unique form of on- 
the-job training. The early and 
special education majors as well 
as the secondary education mi- 
nors went through a special pro- 
gram culminating in a semester 
of student teaching. 

In the semester immediately 
preceeding student teaching, stu- 
dents were placed in area schools 
to complete their practicum. The 
practicum students were assigned 
a cooperating teacher who 
worked with them. The students 
gained a lot from the experience, 
and the cooperating teachers got 
valuable assistance. 

"Practicum students are great. 



Without them we could not do all 
the extra things we do in class, " 
Mr. Bill Turner, a mathematics 
teacher at Harrisonburg High 
commented. The practicum stu- 
dents graded papers and 
occassionally taught class or 
helped with planning lessons. 

"My practicum was definately 
a good experience. 1 learned a lot 
about teaching, and I'm more con- 
fident now," senior Stephanie Bell 
remaked. 

The final step in becoming a 
teacher was the actual student 
teaching. Once again the students 
were assigneci a school and a co- 
operating teacher. Some opted to 
student teach at home while oth- 



in 



ers went to area schools 
Harrisonburg. 

The first few weeks were spent 
with the cooperating teacher and 
adjusting to the classroom . Then 
the student teacher took over the 
classroom and was the teacher for 
the rest of the semester. "I write 
my own lesson plans, create my 
own tests and grade my own pa- 
pers. It's my class to run," senior 
Caralisa Thome commented. "I 
was scared at first, but after a 
couple of days I relaxed and it 
became fun. It was weird not 
being in school all day, but it was 
nice not having homework at 
night. All in all it was great." 
- Rob Singer 




SToRYTIME. Kindergarten student 
Cody spends some time reading. 
Student teachers worked with elemen- 
tary students on practiced chores that 
are second nature for us. 



It 



Eric C. McConnell, Human Comm., Forest, VA 

Lara McConnell, Int. Bus. /Germ., Fredericksburg, VA 

Lisa M. McCord, Nursing, Springfield, VA 

Richard S. McCoy, CIS, Vienna, VA 

Brian T. McCray, Mgt, Staunton, VA 



Erika L. McCullough, Psych., Chesapeake, VA 

James P. McDaniel, Polit. Science, Springfield, VA 

Tara A. McDaniel, Art, Marietta, GA 

Nora F. McDermott, Pub. Admin., Sykesville, VA 

Patrick K. McDonald, Sociology, Richmond, VA 



William E. McDonald, Accounting, Stafford, VA 

Nicholas T. McDowell, Theatre, Reston, VA 

Jennifer L. McFarling, CIS, Danville, VA 

Paul J. McGinnis, Biology, Sterling, VA 

Maureen E. McGovern, History, Woodbridge, VA 




2.2.0 Seniors 




Dina M. McGrady, Mathematics, Luray, VA 
John S. McHugh, Mgt, Colonial Hgts., VA 
Sarah M. McKee, Biology, Starkville, MS 
Keary L. McLeod, Sociology, Alexandria, VA 
Julie M. McMahon, Biology, Dumfries, VA 



Tracie E. McNaron, Psych., Clifton, VA 
Jennifer L. McQueen, Music Educ, Winchester, VA 
Patrick R. McQuillan, CIS, Arlington, VA 
Joseph B. McTernan, Biology, Westbury, VA 
Brian J. Meekins, Sociology, Springfield, VA 






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BACK TO BASICS. Spotswood 
Elementary student Steven practices his 
matching skills, pairing the animals' 
heads to their bodies. Student teachers 
at local area schools work with 
kinciergarten students on many basic 
learning skills. 



PICTURE PAGES. Nathaniel concen- 
trates on his story. Silent reading is a 
skill with which student teachers 
helped their students. 




Micheline M. Menard, Music Ind., Va. Beach, VA 
Katherine G. Menk, English, Glen Allen, VA 
Laura L. Ment, Social Work, Reisterstown, MD 
Christine Messing, Eng./Art Hist., Spencerport, NY 
Kyle H. Meyer, Art/Psych., Midlothian, VA 



Todd A. Meyer, Human Comm., Yorktown, VA 
Katrina M. Migliore, Art/Graph Des., Midlothian, VA 
Donna-Marie Miller, Theatre, Annandale, VA 
Eric M. Miller, Polit. Science, Baldwin, MD 
Pamela 1. Miller, Psych. /ECED, Silver Spring, MD 



Tanya S. Miller, Geology, Edwards, CO 

Todd M. Miller, Polit. Science, Washington, VA 

Wendi J. Miller, Social Work, Mt. Sidney, VA 

Rachel S. Mintz, HRM, Richmond, VA 

Jody M. Mirmelstein, Actg, Newport. News, VA 



Seniors 22 i 



Gregory L. Mitchell, AIS, Lynchburg, VA 

John H. Mitchell Jr., Pub. Admin., Hampton, VA 

William L. Mitchell, Polit. Science, Bedford, VA 

Casey E. Mitschele, Psych., Salem, OR 

Helen K. Modiri, Mass Comm., Richmond, VA 



Anne-Fielding N. Moffett, Music Ed., Richmond, VA 

Jacquelin M. Moleno, Hth. Science, Westerville, OH 

Allen W. Mongold, Accounting, Appomattox, VA 

Ralph L. Montgomery, Finance, Franklin, VA 

Brian T. Moore, Polit. Science, Harrisonburg, VA 




Ah 


SJOR In Person 






7^ brarvd ne.w> \<\nc\ of poe+f*y 


t^eadii^g 






In November of 1992 


and plays. Sponsored by the 


audience. This effect was felt by 






the arts at James Madison found 


English Society and emceed by 


a number of audience members. 




^^^^^^^^^H 


a new, if not somewhat 


English Department Dr. David 


such as sophomore Jenny Carol 




^1 


crowded, home. Crowed owing 


Jeffery, Alastor InPerson sought 


who, for example, felt that "it 


^^H^' ,', , ' '-^i'v^^^H 


.^MM^. >:^H 


to the notion that they came 


to offer the arts a forum outside 


brought the poetry to a new 






together in a single evening 


the common boundaries of print 


dimension to actually see the 






under the guise of Alastor 


and shows, allowing each writer 


faces and hear the voices behind 


■'-^'^'''^^<^H 


^^^^H 


InPerson, a "performance 


to present their work (as well as 


the written word." Sophomore 


Hc'^'-^^v^^H'S 




journal," combining creative 


the work of other's) on an 


psychology major Sarah 






writing with art and music. 


entirely new level. 


Coggins added that it was 






Labeled as the sister 


This uncommon format. 


strange and "moving to hear the 


^^^^^R ' « t-'^^^^T^^ 




production of the literan,' 


moreover, created a reciprocal 


students verbally interpret their 


^^^i^mi 




journal, Alastor, the program 


effect on the writers them- 


own work." 


^^■■■^^^^■^ V 




board boasted six of the most 


selves, sometimes forcing them 


With all proceeds going 






talented writers at the univer- 


to see their work in a different 


to Little Grill's free soup 






sity: Joe Kornick, Catherine 


context, perhaps one outside of 


kitchen, Alastor InPerson 


B^^^^H 




Sherman, Gayle Cohen, Kim- 


what they originally intended. 


achieved its purpose of redefin- 






berly Beach, Robert Krut and 


This new experience, in turn. 


ing the concept of the poetry 


^■'V^vJ^^H 




Angle Blake, reading everything 


enabled the presentation to 


reading at JMU. 






from original poetry to fiction 


exert its myriad effect on the 


-Michael Everton 







Frederick L. Moore II, Geog., Newport News, VA 

Kelly E. Moore, Mass Comm., Roanoke, VA 

Janet L. Moore, English, Roanoke, VA 

Timothy P. Morahan, Mgt, Vienna, VA 

Hallie A. Moreland, Mass Conmi., Davidsonville, MD 



Tonia L. Morell, Psych., Herndon, VA 

Spencer G. Morgan, Int. Affairs, Richmond, VA 

Victoria A. Morgan, Spanish, Midlothian, VA 

Christopher D. Morrow, Mktg, Reston, VA 

Khristina L. Mortimer, Comp. Sci., Colonial Beach, VA 



Lesley A. Moseley, HRM, Richmond, VA 

Ann C. Mostiler, Mktg, Norfolk, VA 

Mary M. Mowbray, Social Work, Danville, VA 

Kimberly D. Moyer, English, Manassas, VA 

Colleen M. Muldoon, Psych., Fairfax Station, VA 







2.2.2. Seniors 




Janice L. Muller, Psych., Medford, NJ 

Christy T. Mumford, EngHsh, Ebony, VA 

AUison Mumper, Hth. Fit./Promo.,Woodbridge, VA 

Tanya P. Munro, Psych. /Spanish, Falls Church, VA 

Ann C. Munzner, English/Comm., Swoope, VA 



Kevin M. Murphy, AIS, Richmond, VA 
Thomas F. Murphy, Polit. Science, Dale City, VA 
James M. Muscar, Sociology, Warrenton, VA 
K. Kamini Naidu, Mass Comm., Fairfax, VA 
Suanne B. Nash, Chemistry, N. Tazewell, VA 





PRESENTATION. A slide provides the 
backdrop for sophomore Robert Krut as 
he reads his original works. Students 
read both original and other people's 
works 



Magirt 



SPOTLIGHT. Senior Joe Kornik reads 
one of his poems to an awaiting 
audience. The night allowed students to 
present their work in a casual and 
receptive atmosphere. 



Laura C. Neff, English, Harrisonburg, VA 
Richard P. Nelson, CIS, Midlothian, VA 
Timothy K. Nelson, Sports Mgt, Louisa, VA 
Saga L. Neuland, Int. Affairs, Heidelberg, Germany 
Kristen L. Newill, Math, Fairfax, VA 



Jennifer M. Newman, Music Ed., Oakton, VA 
Amy T. Nguyen, Human Comm, Norfolk, VA 
Nelly T. Nguyen, Pol. Science, Falls Church, VA 
Thong H. Nguyen, Finance, Vienna, VA 
Diane M. Nies, Hth/Fitness Promo., Silver Spring,VA 



Susan R. Nipps, Kinesiology, Manville, NJ 
Stacy J. Nixon, Psychology, Williamsburg, VA 
Aric 1. Noboa, Public Admin., Herndon, VA 
Timothy R. Noel, Computer Science, Richmond, VA 
David H. Noon, English/History, Iowa City, lA 



Seniors 2.2-3 



Jannette R. Norman, Geology, Harrisonburg, VA 

James G. Norton, English, Fredericksburg, VA 

Shondra L. Nyman, Nursing, Annandale, VA 

Amy T. O'Daniell, English, Dale City, VA 

Jennifer L. O'Donnell, Mktg, Poquoson, VA 



Michael D. O'Mara, Pol. Science, Greencastle, PA 

Vincent J. Obias, Biology, Annandale, VA 

Ann F. O'Conner, Math, Millington, NJ 

Shannon K. O'Connor, Human Comm., Dunfries, VA 

Sung Jin Oh, ClS/Enghsh, Vienna, VA 




VITAL SIGNS. Rescue squad members 
Berkely Brandt, Carl Lambert, Karin 
Starr and Wendy Siemon examine their 
patient Mario Souza. Hands-on 
experience was necessary in this field. 



PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT. Squad 
membersKarin Starr and Wendy Siemon 
practice techniques they learned in their 
classes. Being prepared was important 
to the volunteers. 



Shelley M. Oliver, Biology, Montvale, VA 

Timothy A. Oliver, Accounting, Fairfax Station, VA 

Steven A. Opdyke, POM/CIS, Harrisonburg, VA 

Scott A. Oravec, Public Admin., Midlothian, VA 

Kristy J. Orringer, Math, Chapel Hill, NC 



Karen S. Oswald, Pol. Science, Alpharetta, GA 

Lori A. Page, Mgt, Stafford, VA 

Michael H. Painter, Chem. /Biology, Luray, VA 

Laura M. Palladinetti, Psyc./Early Ed., Sterhng, VA 

Matthew S. Palmer, Int. Affairs, Concord, VA 



Michael A. Palmer, English, Baltimore, MD 

Tracey R. Palmquist, Math, Springfield, VA 

Linette F. Parcell, Art, Martinsville, VA 

Pauline N. Pakidis, Mass Comm., Falls Church, VA 

Cecilia E. Parker, Nursing, Winchester, VA 








r 







2.2.^ Seniors 




Robin D. Parker, CIS, Nassawadox, VA 
Donna L. Parr, Speech Path., Rockville, MD 
Jennifer A. Parrish, Business, Chesapeake, VA 
Mona Lisa Pascul, Int. Bus./Spanish, Va. Beach, VA 
Paula P. Pasicznyk, Speech Path., Lynchburg, VA 



Tina M. Passmore, Business/Mgt., Pasadena, MD 
Aaron M. Pasternack, Human Comm., Gillette, NJ 
Donna L. Patrick, Psych., Annadale, VA 
Kimberly A. Patrick, CIS, Alexandria, VA 
Robert R. Patrick, Anthropology, Purcelleville, VA 



The emergency tones go out 
followed by the shrill of the loud- 
speaker. "Lincoln Nora Union 
950 LNU-950!" A description of 
the accident that occurred fol- 
lowed the license plate number. 
And they were off. 

The Harrisonburg Rescue 
squad was one of the few all- 
volunteer squads. Approxi- 
mately thirty of those volunteers 
were JMU students. Berkely 
Brandt was the highest ranking 
JMU student. "I am the crew 
chief in charge of the ambulance 
and patient care. I am also a 
shock trauma tech which is the 
highest level at the moment. lam 
responsible for all that happens," 
explained Brandt. 




To ThE Rescu 



Sc^uad yn&i-no&y^s volurvteei^ tkei^* tin^e fo Kelp ofKei^s 



Squad members must com- 
plete a nine month training pe- 
riod and were required to sit duty 
a least once a week. Day shifts ran 
from 7:00AM to 1 :00PM and from 
1 :00PM to 7:00PM while the night 
shift ran from 7:00PM to 7:00AM. 

Squad members made sure that 
the ambulances were stocked and 
ready to go on a call. After the 
units were checked, there was a 
different training period each 
week. Once a month, the squad 
held a meeting as well as some 
type of drill. 

Squad members were also re- 
quired to complete an Emergency 
Medical Training class, EMT, 
within one year of becoming a 
member. Specialized classes such 



as EVOC, which allows members 
to drive the ambulance, and ve- 
hicle extrication were also offered. 
For some volunteers, the 
Squad was a learning experience. 
"I always had an interest in medi- 
cine and I wanted to learn more 
about the medical field. It was a 
good way to learn more," said 
senior Karin Starr. 

-Anna Seldon 



Melissa M. Paulino, Psych., Alexandria, VA 
Cynthia L. Payne, Dietetics, Mechansville, VA 
Elizabeth A. Payne, Psych., Colonial Heights, VA 
Lisa A. Payne, Psych., Falmouth, VA 
Kimberly M. Pierce, Soc./ ECED, Mount Airy, MD 



Richard C. Peebles, Biology, Richmond, VA 
Cynthia A. Pendleton, Int. Aff./POSC, Chantilly, VA 
Dawn R. Pendleton, Nursing, Gloucester, VA 
Laurice V. Penn, English, Baltimore, MD 
Courtney J. Penner, Psych., Harrisonburg, VA 



Perry Q. Perault, Human Comm., Basye, VA 

Shelia L. Perkins, Biology, Nathalie, VA 

Eleanor M. Perrine, Art, Burke, VA 

Karen J. Perry, Mass Comm./Eng., Chesapeake, VA 

Timothy M. Persons, Physics, Norfolk, VA 



Seniors 2.2.5 



R. Darrell Peterson, Human Comm., Portsmouth, VA 

Jennifer R. Peterson, Eng./Hist., Parksley, VA 

Kathryn M. Peterson, Eng./Mass Comm., Gretna, VA 

Martha L. Peterson, OSM, Manakin, VA 

Richie H. Peterson, Mktg, Vienna, VA 



George S. Pettit, CIS, Marshall, VA 

Nicole L. Petty, Actg, Sutherlin, VA 

Alexandra M. Petze, Hth. Science, Burke, VA 

Michael W. Pfautz, Psych., Springfield, VA 

Carmen R. Phelps, Soc, Springfield, VA 




RidEON 

SfudeKv+s i^ely on bikes +o >r\al<e it to class on tiirve 



Thev were the world's perfect 
convertibles. And for students 
who did not want to find a park- 
ing space or wait for the bus, they 
were the most efficient form of 
transportation. Being quick, easy 
and readily available, bikes 
played a large part in the lives of 
JMU students. 

Around campus, a common 
site was that of mountain bikes. 
The stability of the bikes and their 
ability to brave any conditions 
made them the most popular type. 
Plus, finding a "parking space" 
for them was easy. Even cold 
weather did not keep cyclists off 
their bikes. "When it gets really 
cold 1 just wrap myself up and 
put on as many clothes as 1 can," 



said senior Ellen Robinson. 

The next genre of bike was 
the racing or road bike. Suited 
best for the streets, road bikes were 
in the minority at JMU. Most 
road bike users were serious rac- 
ers or tourists. Members of the 
bike team would log up to 400 
miles a week around the roads of 
Harrisonburg. Triathlete Doug 
Campbell stated, "The constraints 
that I put on myself while biking 
are entirely dependent upon my 
state of mind. I can either push 
myself to the limit or relax on an 
easy 20 miler. Other constraints 
such as classes, friends, and fam- 
ily cannot be totally controlled 
while biking is what I make it." 
Dave Holloway added, "There's 



nothing like going 30 miles per 
hour on the Keezletown hills. Plus 
it's the only time you will catch 
me in spandex!" 

The final type was the hybrid 
bike. Combining the best fea- 
tures of the road and mountain 
bikes, the hybrids made great 
commuting bikes. While they 
could not take the rough trails 
like mountain bikes, the hybrids 
could traverse most obstacles 
around the university. 

Bikes offered an easy alterna- 
tive to motor transportation to 
and around campus. They gave a 
safe opportunity for exercise and 
fun, and helped add color and 
personality to the campus. 
-Rob Singer 



PEDAL PUSHERS. Christy Callan and 
Charis Gracer walk along Main Street 
on a sunny day. Cyclers often walked 
with friends who didn't have bikes in 
order to catch up on the latest news. 



VAIETI 

WtMIld 

sileh'Ki 
forbicyc 
lleirbiki 



Donald L. Phelps, OSM, Richmond, VA 

Stacy L. Philippi, Mktg, Fairfax, VA 

Amy L. Phillips, Speech Path., Rustburg, VA 

Teresa A. Phillips, Mass Comm., Mathews, VA 

Michael S. Pickering, History, Alexandria, VA 



Erich A. Pieper, Pol. Science, Syosset, NY 

Mark G. Pillsbury, CIS, Baltimore, MD 

Tina R. Pittman, Mgt, Alexandria, VA 

Melissa A. Poliquin, Sp. Path./Rel., Midlothian, VA 

Stephanie D. Popham, Mass Comm., Bowie, MD 



Andrea D. Powell, Psyc./ French, Poquoson, VA 

Caryn A. Powell, Human Comm., Woodbridge, VA 

Carolyn L. Powers, Business, Richmond, VA 

Mark C. Pozniak, History, McLean, VA 

Mark J. Prendergast, Biology, Newton Square, PA 




2.2.S Seniors 




Matthew D. Preusser, CIS, Vienna, VA 
Allison P. Price, Sociology, Williamsburg, VA 
Molly P. Prickett, Human Comm., Va. Beach, VA 
Christina Prichett, Mgt, Martinsville, VA 
Jennifer A. Prichett, History, Richmond, VA 



Jennifer P. Prucha, Sociology, Oakton, VA 
Andrew A. Puckett, Music Ind., Amherst, VA 
Kathryn A. Puckett, Mgt. /Paralegal, Dublin, VA 
Toni J. Puckett, Sociology., Verona, VA 
Beth Anne Pugh, Mass Comm., Harrisonburg, VA 




jV ALtl TAKKINe,. bludents bring their 
bikes indoors for better protection. Bike 
[safety was a major concern on campus 
tfor bicycle owners, so most registered 
kheir bikes with the campus police. 



Ciiitfoyle 

FULL LOT. The popular central parking 
place for bikes outside of Carrier 
Library fills up quickly. Luckily, it was 
still easier to park a bike than a car on 
campus. 




Andrew W. Puller, Economics, Williamsburg, VA 
Jennifer L. Pukerson, Actg, Herndon, VA 
Christopher D. Pursell, Mass Comm., Miami, FL 
Jeffery L. Rae, CIS, Alexandria, VA 
Marcia Rahming, Psych. /Spanish, Harrisonburg, VA 



Wendy L. Raiford, Actg, Franklin, VA 
Chelsea J. Rainey, Art, Reston VA 
Samantha Rakowski, Biology, Woodbridge, VA 
Michael J. Ramey, Comm., Rixeyville, VA 
Marilyn J. Ramos, Psych., Huntington, NY 



Coleen P. Ramsey, Business, Verona, VA 
David K. Ramsey, Business, Front Royal, VA 
Wilson O. Randolph, CIS, Appomattox, VA 
Tamie M. Raplee, Comp. Sci., Salem, VA 
Mark J. Rathke, Geography, Broadway, VA 



Seniors ^ ^/ 



Kirsta L. Rauch, HRM, Winchester, VA 

Mona M. Rawley, Psych., Fieldale, VA 

Robert R. Rayfield, Psych., Cascade, VA 

Stephanie R. Rayfield, Nursing, Richmond, VA 

Steven W. Raymond, Mktg, Strafford, VA 



Jennifer L. Ready, Hist/Sec. Ed., Va. Beach, VA 

Jill E. Beckner, Pysch., Severna Park, MD 

Ian W. Record, Mass Comm./Hist., Harrisonburg, VA 

Laura L. Redmond, Biology, Harrisonburg, VA 

Annamarie Redpath, Int. Bus./Mgt, Springfield, VA 





WAIT FOR THE BEEP. Senior Jeff Burns .xcccAr-cci n ^^ "m" 

' MEbSAGEb! Getting messages could 

plays back the messages on his w.^hien a students day.The answering 

answering machine after class. ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ,^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^ 

Answering machines were almost a , . . .u »j -i ^u ■.„ i •» u 

^ students that didn t have time to sit by 

necessity for the busy college student. ,. . 




Diane M. Reed, Psych., Front Royal, VA 

Lydia A. Reed, Biology, Harrisonburg, VA 

Jennifer L. Reedy, Mkrg., Sterling, VA 

Amy L. Reid, Psych., Alexandria, VA 

Blake D. Reid, Physics, Bethesda MD 



Cathy J. Reid, Soc. Sci. /Spanish, Annadale, VA 

Donna L. Reid, Hth, Science, Staunton, VA 

Amy E. Renauld, Biology, Greenwich, NY 

Cynthia A. Reynolds, Soc, Rocky Mount, VA 

James R. Reynolds II, Mgt, Patrick Springs, VA 



K. Scott Renyolds, Mass Comm., Patrick Springs, VA 

Richard S. Renyolds, Comp. Sci., Elkton, VA 

Sarah P. Reynolds, Music Ed., Mosely, VA 

Rhonda R. Rhinehart, Psych., Verona VA 

Melanie L. Rhode, Art Hist., Va. Beach, VA 




228 Seniors 




Vincent A. Rhodes, Communications, Norfolk, VA 
Serena C. Ricci, Hth. Science, Neshanic, NJ 
Andrew J. Riccobono, Acgt, Springfield, VA 
Stephanie M. Rich, Int. Affairs, Coral Springs, VA 
Cristina A. Richardson, Psych, Lorton, VA 



Christopher S. Richardson, Bio., Christiansburg, VA 
Diane C. Richardson, CIS, Alexandria, VA 
Deborah A. Richerson, MCOM, Ft. Washington, MD 
Daegal J. Richmond, Mgt, Washington, DC 
Alice T. Riddick, Business, Franklin, VA 







ANsw/ERii\q MacMnes 

"Tke Kvecessa^*y evil 






When you calledthe weather, 
you did not expect a real live 
human being to sing the Diet 
Pepsi theme and then proceed to 
tell you the day's highs and lows. 
The same goes for that good old 
registration line. Did you actu- 
ally think that someone could be 
paid enough to tell angry stu- 
dents that they would have to 
wait yet another semester to take 
English 1 02? But, when you called 
a professor in sheer panic be- 
cause you were not sure what 
was on the test, you expected to 
hear a real voice. Instead you 
heard something along the lines 
of: "1 cannot take your call right 
now because 1 am screening my 
phone calls." 




The wonderful world of an- 
swering machines. It seemed as if 
everybody had one. Whatever the 
type, be it campus voice mail, the 
standard answering machine or 
the kind that recorded on CDs, 
answering machines were a staple 
of the hectic college life. "1 have 
an answering machine because 1 
don't want to miss any calls," said 
senior Hannah Hinely. 

After having selected the ideal 
machine, the owner must decide 
on an appropriate message. Se- 
nior Robin Parker said, "I used to 
think that funny answering ma- 
chine messages were cute, but 
now that I have potential em- 
ployers calling me for interviews 



1 don't want them to think that 
they may be hiring a total idiot." 
With answering machines be- 
ing used more and more, do 
people get used to talking to an 
entity that does not respond? "I 
hate answering machines because 
I never know what to say. 1 feel 
like I'm talking to myself," said 
senior Nancy Trent. 
-Anna Selden 



Wayne A. Riddle, Mgt, Glen Allen, VA 
Michelle L. Ries, Actg, Front Royal, VA 
Scott M. Riesett, Mktg, Towson, MD 
Shane E. Riley, Mgt, Edgewater, MD 
Tammy A. Rinehart, Soc, Herndon, VA 



Michele Riselli, Human Comm., Springfield, VA 
Thomas E. Rivers Jr., Mktg, Richmond, VA 
Michele L. Roach, Psyc/Early Ed., Lynchburg, VA 
William T. Roach, Actg., Surry, VA 
Bradford L. Roberts,Int. Bus. /Spanish, Lewisburg, PA 



Catherine C. Robie, Mgt, Portsmouth, VA 

Julie A. Robinette, Art, Manassas, VA 

Brian T. Robinson, Physics/Spanish, State College, PA 

Maria L. Robinson, Mass Comm., Portsmouth, VA 

Paton E. Robinson, Finance, Damascus, MD 



Seniors £29 



Tosha L. Robinson, Psych., Goochland, VA 

John C. Rodal, Mgt, Poquoson, VA 

Kimberly E. Roehrig, Int. Affairs, Setauket, NY 

John S. Rogers, Pol. Science, White Plains, MD 

Melissa J. Roish, Sociol./Ed., Richmond, VA 



Matthew B. Rollston, Pol. Science, Richmond, VA 

Alexander J. Roman, Ath. Training, Woodbridge, VA 

Kristin E. Romjue, English, Hampton, VA 

Carrie K. Rosicky, Art, Burke, VA 

Michael P. Ross, Finance, Herndon,VA 




r^:^ 





•sr 



FAJThfulFolloWERS 



On any given weekend night 
one could find a concert on or off 
campus, in or out of Harrisonburg, 
for charity or profit. JMU students 
were like students across the coun- 
try when it came to appreciating 
and supporting music. Whether 
it was local bands like Full Stop 
and BS&M or famous bands such 
as Grateful Dead and Jimmy Buf- 
fet, JMU students loved to follow 
and support bands. 

Locally some of the favorites 
included Full Stop, New Potato 
Caboose, BS&M, Newman Un- 
derground, Johnny's Heritage, 
Everything, Psuade Farm, and 
Burlap. Students frequented JM's, 
Tully's and Joker's to enjoy a fun- 



T~ans stay fune-a \n 

filled evening of bands and 
friends. Senior Carrie Desmond 
said, "I'll go anywhere, anytime 
to see Everything — I'm an avid 
fan." 

Other people-usually those 
under twenty-one- preferred the 
more well-known bands because 
they had more access to their con- 
certs. Sophomore Jeff Gothelf 
said, "Queensryche is God's gift 
to music." Many students trav- 
elled every weekend to see con- 
certs of their favorite perform- 
ers. Luckily this year James Tay- 
lor fans didn't have to travel. J.T. 
happily came to them. Fans were 
thrilled to see one of their favor- 
ite performers on their own turf. 



Sophomore Matt Moetzinger was 
speechless after the show but 
managed to comment that "James 
Taylor was beautiful, just 
beautiful. ..awesome." 

Some of the more dedicated 
groupies went to all extremes to 
see their top musicians. Many 
went as far as Richmond, Wash- 
ington D.C. and even Baltimore 
to catch good shows. They were 
always pleased with their sacri- 
fice- to most people a good con- 
cert was better than socializing 
with friends and partying in 
Harrisonburg anyday. 

-Colleen Magin 




Jennifer E. Rota, Pol. Science, Silver Spring, MD 

Gregory W. Roth, CIS, Cranford, NJ 

William E. Rouck, CIS, Annandale, VA 

Christine E. Rouland, Chemistry, Crownsville, MD 

Beverly Ann Rowe, Psych., Staunton, VA 



Jeryl D. Rowe, Psych., Bridgewater, VA 

Kristin E. Rozum, English, Richmond, VA 

Michelle L. Ruark, Mgt, Deltaville, VA 

Christopher B. Ruble, History, Waynesboro, VA 

Jennifer R. Rusthoven, English, Springfield, VA 



Krisha S. Rylands, Pol. Sci./Spanish,Laurenceville,VA 

Jennifer M. Sacco, Pol. Science, Franklin, VA 

James E. Samuel, English, Lutherville, MD 

John C. Sandhofer, Psych., Richmond, VA 

Robyn E. Sands, Mktg, Richmond, VA 




2.30 Seniors 



I 




Troyhann S. Santos, Comm./Eng., Whitby, Ontario 
Christy L. Sargent, Mgt., Va. Beach, VA 
Allison L. Satre, Mass Comm., Great Falls, VA 
Carrie A. Scattergood, Mass Comm., Winstead, CT 
Jennifer A. Schaeffer, Actg, Springfield, VA 



Teresa M. Schatteles, English, Springfield, VA 
Elyse L. Schechter, Speech Path., Richmond, VA 
Stephen G. Schein, Int. Affairs, Arlington, VA 
Kristen P. Scheuble, Soc, Marshall, VA 
Anne Marie Scheuerle, Pol. Science, Fairfax, VA 



»-" 






igd^Bli^ig^^ 


^^^^jihHFv' 


f ' / ^rp-- "^•^-^^^^U' 






IT'S A ZOO Senior Glen Bloodworth 
sports his U2 "ZooTour" t-shirt. T- 
shirts were a medium for students to 
express their devotion to various 
music groups. 



Haws 
HEADS ABOVE THE REST Seniors 
Charles Baston and Alex Rubano jump 
around the crowd at the UPB spon- 
sored Ocean Blue concert. The weather 
put a damper on things—because of 
rain, the concert was moved from the 
Godwin field indoors to the gym. 



Ceniofaiiti 




Erika J. Schiele, Gen. Soc. Science, Flanders, NJ 
Lauren D. Schloss, Psych. Norfolk, VA 
Anja K. Schmidt, HRM, Durrheim, Germany 
Nicolette Schmitt, Actg, Vienna, VA 
Kristina Schneider, Int. Bus., Alexandria, VA 



Mark L. Schneider, Mgt/CIS, Forest Hill, VA 
Elaine Schoka, Psyc, Reston, VA 
Robin R. Schooley, Math, Staunton, VA 
Janel S. Schuh, Mass Comm., Argentina 
Karen J. Schulstad, Int. Affairs, Fairfax, VA 



Suzanne C. Schultze, Eng./Sec. Ed., Richmond, VA 
Elizabeth A. Schutta, English, Centreville, VA 
Gwendolyn Schuyler, Psych., Baltimore, MD 
Craig A. Schwartz, Mass Comm., Richmond, VA 
Cynthia J. Scott, English, Mechanicsville, VA 



Seniors 23 i 



Kelly D. Scott, Actg., Arlington, VA 

Rebecca D. Scott, Speech Path., Tazewell, VA 

Sharon 1. Scott, English, Dover, DE 

Karen L. Scoville, Math, Laurel, MD 

Stephen E. Scranton, Biology, Orange Park, PL 



WUliam I. Scudder, Geog./HCOM, Yorktown, VA 

Gregory C. Seal, Kin., Shenandoah, VA 

Heather L. Searls, Biology, Gloucester, VA 

Tara K. Selario, Fash. Mdse, Arlington, VA 

Anna Selden, Mass. Comm., Springfield, VA 





ONE HAPPY FAMILY. JMU Alumni 
Jennifer Keach, Brandon Lynch and Ron 
Copeland the owner open the Little Grill 
as a soup kitchen on Monday nights in 
an effort to help the underprivileged. 



ON THE GRILL. Laura Sherman and 
Patrick Farnholt meet at the Grill for a 
few drinks. Students often gathered at 
the Little Grill for dinner or just to 
socialize. 




Jennifer L. Shaffer, Music Ind., Morgantown, WV 

Alison M. Shaner, Telecom., Madison Heights, VA 

Marsi E. Shapiro, Chemistry, Severna Park, MD 

Monica T. Sharper, Actg, Harrisonburg, VA 

Kristin L. Sharrocks, Biology, Fairfax, VA 



Walter M. Shaub Jr., History, Harrisonburg, VA 

Catherine M. Sheehan, Psych., Norfolk, VA 

Joseph W. Shelby, Comp. Science, Harrisonburg, VA 

E. Wiley Shelor, English, Alexandria, VA 

Laura L. Sheperd, Human Comm., Glasgow, VA 



Viveca J. Sheppard, Psych., Poolesville, MD 

Keith Sherwood, Finance, Gaithersburg, MD 

Rebecca J. Shuford, History, Oakton, VA 

Rick J. Shuman, CIS, Lynchburg, VA 

Loren M. Sikora, Int. Bus., Toms River, NJ 



232 Seniors 




t 




Jill M. Simoniz, Psych., Alexandria, VA 
Cheree A. Simpson, Speech Path., Winchester, VA 
Christopher J. Simpson, Mktg., Midlothian, VA 
Katherine A. Simpson, Anthro., Salisbury, MD 
Michelle F. Simpson, Psych., Va. Beach, VA 



Robert M. Singer, Mathematics, Burke, VA 
Angela S. Singleton, Mktg, Highland Springs, VA 
Denise C. Slagle, Mass Comm., Manassas, VA 
James B. Slatee, Ath. Training, Westminster, MD 
Kara L. Slaughter, English/Ed., Roanoke, VA 




STEPPEN' OUT. Brandon Lynch '"'"■'"' 
performs his smoothest moves on the 
dance floor. The 70s parties were among 
the grill's most popular events. 



TIhe UttIe GrIII 

TTKe place fok' Kci»^gi»^g oui '\n \~\c\y^nsona 



p\CKC-e. 

Surrounded by numerous au- 
tomobile repair shops and a 
chicken feed processing plant, the 
Little Grill was not difficult to 
miss. Located in downtown 
Harrisonburg, the Little Grill was 
well out of the way for most stu- 
dents. 

At first glance, the Grill, as it 
was called by students, appeared 
to be just another soup and sand- 
wich shop; however, upon step- 
ping inside, the Grill took on c]uite 
a different aura. The decorum 
was anything but ordinary — a 
guitar and a bicycle donned the 
walls while antique pottery found 
a place among the wooden 
shelves that lined the building's 
perimeter. JMU photography 



professor and JMU alumna 
Corinne McMullen described the 
atmosphere as "rustic and fun." 

Stutients flocked to this cul- 
tural depot for a variety of rea- 
sons. "I love going to the Grill 
and just hangin' out . . . It's great 
fun watching the people who are 
there," commented Junior Will 
Bowles. 

The Grill not only offered stu- 
dents the opportunity to meet 
friends and socialize, it also af- 
forded students the opportunity 
to express their talents. The Grill 
hosted weekly Open Stage Nights 
in which students, faculty and 
members of the Harrisonburg 
community sang or played acous- 
tic music. Large crowds also 



gathered to hear original poetry_ 
read and sometimes even com- 
posed at the poetry readings. "The 
readings at the grill are incred- 
ible," said sophomore English 
major Mike Everton. "I go almost 
every week." 

The Little Grill also sponsored 
less intellectual activites. One of 
their most popular events was 
their seventies party. "I love the 
disco parties," said sophomore 
Mary Katherine Wall. "The best 
part is dressing up." 

The grill offered students of all 
tastes an experience filled with 
great food and culture. As one 
Grill patron put it, "The Grill is 
definitely the hippest place in 
town." 

-Cindy Scott 




Shane W. Sleighter, POM/CIS, Newport News, VA 
Anna-Marie C. Slot, Econ., Harrisonburg, VA 
Scott B. Smedley, Mass Comm., Sykesville, MD 
Allison C. Smith, Int. Bus., Woodbridge, VA 
Andrea R. Smith, History, Winchester, VA 



Becky D. Smith, Finance, Fairfax Station, VA 
Brian E. Smith, CIS, Kilmarnock, VA 
Carol G. Smith, Int. Affairs, Ruckersville, VA 
C. Douglas Smith, Sociology, Hampton, VA 
Christine J. Smith, Speech Path., Centreville, VA 



Heather L. Smith, Pol. Sci. /English, Midlothian, VA 
Jennifer M. Smith, Psychology, Richmond, VA 
Laurie M. Smith, Mgt, Burtonsville, MD 
Leslie C. Smith, Mass Comm., Temple Hills, MD 
Marcy D. Smith, English, Lovettsville, VA 



Seniors 23 3 



Shannon R. Smith, Biology, Quinton, VA 

Vincent L. Smith, Biology, Rockville, MD 

William J. Smullen, Mathematics, Millington, NJ 

Joanna P. Snyder, Mktg, Chester, MD 

Jeong H. Song, Actg, Harrisonburg, VA 



Jennifer A. Sonnichsen, Fine Arts, Springfield, VA 

Mary D. Sorrell, Psych., Herndon, VA 

Mario J. Souza, Biology, South Boston, VA 

Derek C. Spangler, Pol. Science, Mechanicsville, VA 

Sarah E. Spangler, Biology, Williamsburg, VA 




TRick Or Treat 

S+udeKvfs di^ess it up j-or -l-lallovv^eerv 



It happened some time in 
early October. Pumpkins were 
being selected, fake spiders were 
being hung and paper skeletons 
were placed on doors. The search 
then ensued for the perfect cos- 
tume. Most people got into the 
Halloween spirit, and JMU stu- 
dents were no different. 

Rather than opt for the trick- 
or -treating of younger days, stu- 
dents hit the party scene. Senior 
Marcia Rahming said, "1 went to 
West Virginia to spend some time 
with a friend. We drank and 
danced the whole night." 

Finding an ideal costume was 
vital to a successful night of par- 
tying. Those who chose complex 
costumes encountered serious 



problems. "I had a killer cos- 
tume, but it took about 11/2 
hours to put on. I couldn't go 
out until 1 :00am because it took 
so long to put on the costume. I 
used trash bags and went as 
Catwoman," explained senior 
Leona Baker. 

Other students had no inten- 
tion of dressing up, but with a 
little encouragement, they joined 
in the fun. "1 was planning to go 
out with a few friends, but not to 
dress up. All of my friends were 
in costume. They slapped a 
pumpkin trash bag on me at the 
last minute and viola, a cos- 
tume. It was a blast," recalled 
senior Anne Sugar. 

Halloween parties also gave 



students the chance to see how 
others would dress up. " I went 
toabigMCOMparty. My favor- 
ite costume was Pat from Satur- 
day Night Live. I still don't know 
if it was a guy or a girl. He/She 
really played the part. I also saw 
one guy dressed as someone 
from the Village People. Every 
time someone saw him, they 
would make the YMC A hand sig- 
nals," stated junior Julie Monrad. 
All in all, students enjoyed the 
Halloween festivities. Plastic 
singing bats, cotton spider webs, 
and old jack-o-lanterns were left 
in place well after the evening 
was over. 

-Anna Selden 




Andrew B. Spannaus, Philos., Lovettsville, VA 

Thomas Speiss, Comm, Rancho Santo Margarita, CA 

Marcia D. Spencer, Art, Stafford, VA 

Michael H. Spencer, Finance, Columbia, MD 

Daniel R. Spensieri, Pol. Science, Katonah, NY 

Stacy L. Spivey, Actg, Colonial Heights, VA 

Scott Spradlin, Pol. Science, Richmond, VA 

Sean A. Springer, Actg, Manassas, VA 

Catherine M. St.Germain, Theatre, Burke, VA 

Maria J. Staggers, Actg, Dumfries, VA 



Jennifer Starkey, Fash. Mdse, Highland Springs, VA 

Karin M. Starr, Biology, Great Falls, VA 

Richard L. Steinle, Econ./Mgt, River Vale, NJ 

Jill M. Stephens, English, Cinnaminson, NJ 

Ellen M. Stern, Human Comm., Silver Spring, MD 




23 ^ Seniors 




Melissa B. Stevens, Pol. Science, Springfield, VA 
Carlton C. Stevens Jr., Mktg./Mgt., Glen Allen, VA 
Tracy L. Stewart, Psych., Springfield, VA 
Jennifer E. Stone, Psych. /Ed., Ellicott City, MD 
Melvin D. Strane Jr., Graph. Design, Richmond, VA 



Stuart P. Strange, Pol. Science, Burke, VA 
Andrew B. Strasser, Mgt., Newport, R.I. 
Christopher E. Straub, Psych., Lewisburg, PA 
Daniel C. Strayton, Kin., Mt. Airy, MD 
Kurt L. Streckfuss, Mass Comm. /French, Wayne, NJ 





BIG GUYS. The Incredible Hulk and 
Superman add muscle and might to a 
fun night of partying. 

ODD COUPLE. Elf Chris Haws and 
baseball player Jennifer Stone head for a 
Halloween party together. 



HELL'S ANGELS. Friends get decked 
out in rebel attire. Halloween allowed 
some students to bring out their devilish 
side. 




Brian E. Strehlow, Pol. Science, Va. Beach, VA 
Bridgett L. Streiff, Human Comm., Weyers Cave, VA 
Jocelyn M. Strother, Psych., Springfield, VA 
Kimberley P. Stuart, Mass Comm., Richmond, VA 
Koren D. Stucki, Mktg, Alexandria, VA 



Veleka M. Studivant, Pub. Relations, Va. Beach, VA 
Christopher M. Stup, Music Ind., Frederick, MD 
Anne M. Sugar, History, Va. Beach, VA 
Annemarie K. Sullivan, English, Harrisonburg, VA 
Robert B. Suit, Mass Comm., Winchester, VA 



Michala D. Sumnick, Psych., Va. Beach, VA 
Marvin J. Sun, Actg, Potomac, MD 
Nicole J. Sutter, Psych., Centreville, VA 
DeDreama S. Swanson, Psych., Williamsburg, VA 
Carol E. Swartwood, English, Fairfax Station, VA 



Seniors i2-J^ 



Kent O. Swartz, Comp. Science, Stuarts Draft, VA 

Lisa A. Swecker, Sociology, Stuarts Draft, VA 

Stacy A. Swenson, Psych., Springfield, VA 

Alison K. Swenton, Int. Bus./French, Hauppauge, NY 

Edwin Y. Szeto, Finance, Va. Beach, VA 



Samer S. Tahboub, Mktg, Earlysville, VA 

Kimberlv M. Talbert, Sociology, Richmond, VA 

Andrea D. Talbot, Mass Comm., Virginia Beach, VA 

Sheena J. Talbot, Human Comm., Virginia Beach, VA 

Tony E. Tallent, Psychology, Staunton, VA 





TRENDY 'DO. Sophomore Tyler Theriot 
wears a bandana to keep his long hair 
out of his eyes while studying. 
Bandanas were a fashion accessory 
donned by both sexes. 



FLASHBACK. Angle Lee Jun sports 60s 
style glasses and a natural hairstyle. 
Walking around campus, one could spot 
hairstyles ranging from the natural look 
to stiff, gelled styles. 




Matizc -Wj-' 



Vernon L. Talley, Mgt, Norfolk, VA 

Kevin A,. Tapp, Finance/ Econ., Herndon, VA 

Vincent D. Taroy, Mass Comm., Hurt, VA 

Laurie Tarkington, Paint./ Graph. Des., Chester, VA 

Julie E. Tavenner, Psych., Berryville, VA 



Amy E. Taylor, Human Comm. Houston, TX 

Bryan D. Taylor, Psych., Burke, VA 

Jennifer F. Taylor, Biology, Chesapeake, VA 

Leslie Taylor, Art History, Fairfax, VA 

Lionel S. Taylor, Mgt, Burke, VA 



Melinda A. Taylor, Psych./ Special Ed., Grafton, VA 

Rochelle E. Taylor, Psych., Woodbridge, VA 

Hillary A. Tennant, Int. Affairs, Lortland, NY 

Staci A. Terry, Actg, Purcellville, VA 

David S. Thomas, Econ. /Pol. Science, Fairfax, VA 



236 Seniors 




I 




Susan E. Thomas, Chemistry, Mechanicsburg, PA 
Toya J. Thompson, Pol. Science, Lawrenceville, VA 
Suzanne K. Thompson, Int. Affairs, Vienna VA 
Carahsa Thome, OSM, Richmond, VA 
Deborah A. Thrift, Sociology/Ed, Alexandria, VA 



Mark M. Thurston, Actg., Louisa, VA 
Heather A. Tierney, Psych., Falls Church, VA 
Tara C. Tinsley, CIS, Clifton Forge, VA 
Mary A. Tipton, Psych., Forest, VA 
Carmen C. Tisinger, English, Winchester, VA 




HAvi^q A Good HaIr Day 



CJ| it looks gooc\^ spray it 



Mil 1^1 n 

EAVY METAL. Keyboard player Jeff 
cithelf puts down a new song, 
usicians were often well known for 
eir striking and sometimes different 
lirstyles. 



All over campus, one could see 
the kaleidoscope of different 
stylesandcolorof hairstyles. Hair 
trends could change as fast as the 
fashion world, sometimes even 
surpassing it. The 1990's led the 
way for new and exciting looks, 
while maintaining some from the 
past. 

Those that said that only 
"blonde was beautiful" had not 
paid attention to those around 
them. More and more, brunettes 
and redheads were taking over. 
Even in the movies, dark haired 
ladies were in bigger demand. In 
Disney's last three cartoons, none 
of the leading ladies were blonde. 



Instead, one was a redhead while 
two were brunettes. 

While color choices differed, 
many hair styles went towards 
the long side. Both men and 
women could be seen sporting 
long hair. "Long hair looks much 
better on women," commented 
junior Jason Lich, "especially if 
it's long and wavy." 

Not everybody agreed with 
the idea of long hair being the 
best. Tiffani Gobbi said, "Short 
hair is more flattering for a lot of 
people because it draws attention 
to their good features, like their 
eyes." With all the products out 
on the market, hairstyles were un- 



limited. 

Even men were more into the 
hairstyle craze. Long on top with 
the sides shaved seemed to be the 
way to go for most guys at JMU. 
Longer styles started to come into 
play for men as well. One style 
that almost was never "out" was 
the classic military buzz cut. "A 
buzz cut is the best in the sum- 
mertime," said senior Fred Moore. 
"It's the wake up and go haircut." 

There was no one typical col- 
lege hairstyle. College life gave 
many the opportunity to experi- 
ment with "new doos" and help 
end the search for that perfect 
look. -Joe Olson 




Julia E. Tock, Psych., Falls Church, VA 
Donna L. Tomasello, Psych., Arnold, MD 
Kelly A. Tomlin, Mktg., Springfield, VA 
Katherine M. Travers, CIS/Mgt, Williamsburg, VA 
Victoria A. Travitz, Int. Bus., Mgt, Chesapeake, VA 



Chelsea L. Traylor, CIS, Woodbridge, VA 
Nancy G. Trent, Nursing, Appomattox, VA 
C. Scott Tribble, Mass Comm., Richmond, VA 
William J. Troiano, Actg, Clarks Summit, PA 
Douglas F. Trout, Pol. Science, Reston, VA 



Edward D. Trout, English, Martinsburg, WV 
Valory Trumpy, Chemistry, West River, MD 
Jill A. Tucillo, Psych., Rockaway, NJ 
Kimberly S. Tufts, English, Woodbridge, VA 
Cynthia M. Tyree, Psych., Lynchburg, VA 



Seniors 23 / 



Joseph W. Uglialoro, Actg., Huntington, NY 

Leslie K. Upson, Biology, Drewryville, VA 

Kathleen B. Vann, Mgt, Fairfax, VA 

Shannon L. Vassar, HCOM, Charlotte Court, VA 

Joseph J. Vaughan, Pol. Science, Ronanoke, VA 



Rebecca M. Vestal, Actg, Chesterfield, VA 

Dennis S. Vicchio, CIS, Lynchburg, VA 

Kenneth N. Vick, Pol. Science, Charleston, SC 

HoUie R. Vona, Pol. Science/HCOM, Frederick, MD 

Derek C. Von Bechmann, CIS, Richmond, VA 




GivlNq SoiviETlHii\q BAck 

(Z-oncze-i^n for +Ke future leads studerv+s to recycle 



What happened to the good 

old days when people used to just 
throw things away? These days 
cans get washed out, wrappers 
get removed from soda bottles 
and empty pizza boxes lay dor- 
mant by the trash. In our continu- 
ing quest to make the Earth a 
safer place to be, everybody who 
was anybody recycled. 

Among the recyclable items 
were cans, bottles, gallon milk 
jugs, hair spray bottles and the 
list could go on and on. While 
there were numerous products 
that could be recycled, students 
still encountered a few problems. 
Senior Jocelyn Strother said. 



"There are so many companies 
that produce items that can be 
recycled but many places won't 
take them. It kind of defeats the 
purpose." 

Students who lived in the resi- 
dence halls on campus had the 
added advantage of designated 
areas for recycling. A quick glance 
at those large wooden crates Mon- 
day morning would reveal that 
most students were conscientious 
enough to recycle beer cans, the 
boxes they came in and the pizza 
that helped the beer go down. 
Some students went beyond the 
traditional items and recycled 
more unusual products. "We re- 



cycled everything, even D-Hall 
menus," said junior Tracey Wong. 

For those students off campus, 
recycling was a bit more difficult. 
They had to get special green 
plastic recycling boxes and sepa- 
rate the materials to be recycled, 
which were picked weekly. 

With the majority of the JMU 
community involved in the recy- 
cling effort, how did they feel 
about those who ignored the en- 
tire process? "Big chumps who 
use styrofoam cups need to learn 
a thing or two," warned junior 
Drew Tomlin. 

-Anna Selden 




/ 



I 



Marjorie H. Villaflor, Psych., Norfolk, VA 

Stacey F. Waddel, Nursing, Harrisonburg, VA 

Frank B. Wade, Actg, Port Tobacco, MD 

Stephanie L. Wagoner, OSM, MT. Sidney, VA 

Amy M. Walker, Mass Comm., Bumpass, VA 



Charlene L. Walker, Music Ed., Richmond, VA 

Christopher C. Wallace, History, Leesburg, VA 

Kristine L. Wallace, Mass Comm., Manassas Park, VA 

Philip Walsh, Psych., Falls Church, VA 

Dawn L. Walters, Psych., Charlottesville, VA 



Todd A. Walton, CIS, Richmond, VA 

Alyson Walty, Art, Montvale, NJ 

Sarah C. Wampler, Mktg, Burke, VA 

C. Lawson Waring, Comm., Richmond, VA 

Angela D. Warren, Mktg/Fash. Mdse, Fishersville,VA 



^JO Seniors 





Ashley B. Warren, Finance/Bus. Law, Neptune, NJ 
William A. Watson, Finance, Chesapeake, VA 
Carmelita M. Watts, Finance, Evington, VA 
Sheri L. Watts, Mgt, Springfield, VA 
Susan R. Watts, Psych., Lynchburg, VA 



Deborah B. Wayne, Mass Comm., Vienna, VA 
Sonya A. Weaver, English, Portsmouth, VA 
Amanda M. Wedberg, English, Gaithersburg, MD 
Jennifer A. Weede, Soc. Sci./Fash. Mdse, Quincy, IL 
Lisa M. Wehrli, Mgt, Naperville, IL 



^ > 





STACKS. WXJM keeps recycling bins in 
their offices to help promote awareness. 
Several campus organizations contrib- 
uted to the university's recycling effort. 



SECOND TIME AROUND. These 
recycling bins in the WCC Vk-ere the 
latest of a universtiy-wide effort. Bins 
couki be found all over campus. 




Deborah A. Weiss, Public Admin., Sterling, VA 
Katrine M. Weiss, Finance/Psych., Lutherville, MD 
Dana L. Wellens, Mktg, Olney, MD 
Robin M. Wells, Fit/Hth Promotion, Rustburg, VA 
William E. Wells, Finance/Actg, Gaithersburg, MD 



Joseph L. Welsh, English, Danville, IN 
Robert J. Wenthold, Biology, Bethesda, MD 
Karen M. West, French, Fredericksburg, VA 
Richard O. Westrich, Sports Mgt, Sterling, VA 
Bradley S. White, Art, Pulaski, VA 



Erika E. White, Pol. Science, Orange, VA 
Frances M. White, CIS, Sterling, VA 
Jeffery M. White, Mktg, Bealeton, VA 
Richard L. White, Finance, Springfield, VA 
Simone M. White, Art History, Memphis, TN 



Seniors 239 



Cynthia L. Whitt, Biology, South Boston, VA 

David W. Whitten, Art, Waynesboro, VA 

Caryn S. Widrick, Music, Allentown, PA 

Donald W. Wilder, CIS, Portsmouth, VA 

Karen-Lynne Wildgrube, Nursing, Culpeper, VA 



AnnaLisa Wilkinson,lBUS/Mktg,Harrisonburg, VA 

Christine D. Williams, Comp. Sci., Winchester, VA 

Eriq R. Willams, Sociology, Hampton, VA 

Kimberly L. Williams, Psych., Manassas, VA 

Michelle N. Williams, Speech Path., Norfolk, VA 






J V 







ROAD TRIP. JMU students Sarah Allen 
and Kristi Shackelford visit Laura 
Garrett at Radford University. Many 
students made roadtrips to visit friends 
over the fall break weekend. 



ALL WRAPPED UP. Alisa Rubin and 
Jennifer Rowen enjoy the Alpha Chi 
hayride held over fall break. Many 
students opted to stay in Harrisonburg 
for the day. 




Stephen C. Williams, Mktg, Front Royal, VA 

Timothy D. Williams, Mktg, Sunderland, MD 

Susan L. Williamson, History, Fairfax, VA 

Marcus J. Wilson, CIS, Woodbridge, VA 

Shawnda L. Wilson, AIS, Woodbridge, VA 



Suzanne C. Wilson, English, Hampton, VA 

Veronica L. Wilson, Sociology, Hampton, VA 

Margaret E. Winter, Psych., Glen Allen, VA 

Nicole M. Wise, Human Comm., Berryville, VA 

Catherine A. Withrow, Mktg/Mgt, Vienna, VA 

Brian T. Womack, History, Arlington, VA 

Kevin R. Woo, Int. Bus. /Mktg, Upper Marlboro, MD 

Rebecca A. Wood, HCOM., Woodbury Height, NJ 

Julie L. Wooddell, Mktg, Falls Church, VA 

Donna L. Woodson, Int. Bus. /Spanish, Roanoke, VA 

















2^0 Seniors 




Diane H. Worringham, Soc. Work,Christainsburg, VA 

Damon W.D. Wright, Pol. Science, Richmond, VA 

Emily T. Wu, Nursing, Burke, VA 

Karen D. Wunder, Mgt, Silver Spring, MD 

Joseph W. Yates, Human Comm., Mechanicsville, VA 



Scott E. Yeager, Gen. Soc. Science, Vinton, VA 
Garnett W. Yeatts, Comp. Science, Gretna, VA 
Piper L. Yerks, Human Comm., Vienna, VA 
Jodi L. Yingling, Sociology, Roanoke, VA 
Lori L. Yonek, Int. Bus. /German, McMurray, PA 




TAkiNq A DAy Off 

S+uderv+s fake advaiatage o| tkeir |all break 



It may only be for one day, but 
if the administration did away 
with Fall Break, they would have 
quite an uproar on their hands. 
The break, which generally falls 
in between the beginning of the 
semester and Thanksgiving, gave 
students one extra day to sleep in, 
one extra day to goof off, or one 
extra day to make up for all of the 
other days of goofing off. 

Most students tried to escape 
the 'Burg in hopes of exciting ad- 
ventures. Senior Jeanne 
Bollendorf said, "I went to West 
Virginia to see some Indian 
mounds that the native Ameri- 
cans built and as it turned out 
M„^,„ there were only two mounds left. 



The one that I saw was so bad that 
I kept driving past it. There were 
steps leading up to it, a liquor 
store next to it, and an industrial 
plant across the street." 

Other students used the long 
weekend to make some extra 
money. For some, this meant a 
trip home to return to a summer 
job. "I went home to replenish 
my bank account. I worked at a 
diner and made almost $200 in 
three days," explained senior Beth 
Pugh. 

Students with jobs in the 
Harrisonburg area used the extra 
days to put in more hours. "I 
stayed here and worked all day 
Friday and Saturday," said se- 



nior Marcia Rahming. 

For those people that were able 
to go home and did not have to 
work. Fall Break gave them the 
perfect opportunity to catch up 
with family members. Explained 
senior Jocelyn Strother, "I went 
home and went out with my fam- 
ily." 

There were a few people who 
stayed in Harrisonburg for the 
break. However, the campus was 
not void of activities. "I stayed 
here and watched all of the bands. 
It was the Parade of Champions 
and the bands were awesome," 
said freshman Jo- An Malahy. 
-Anna Selden 




Charles B. Young, History, Bealeton, VA 
Felicia L. Young, Pub. Admin., Richmond, VA 
Scott E. Zamer, Actg, Blacksburg, VA 
Matthew D. Zickel, Int. Affairs, Reston, VA 
Christopher J. Zimmerman, Hist., Falls Church, VA 



Christopher W. Zimmerman, Soc. Science, Chvle., VA 
Gretchen H. Zimmerman, Nursing, Phoenix, MD 
Erin K. Zitelli, Mktg/Art, Warrenton, VA 
Tracy L. Zoeckler, Int. Affairs, Arlington, VA 
Christine M. Zook, Chemistry, Brownstown, PA 



Seniors z2.^i 



Mindy Aitken 

Michael Allred 

Kimherley Amprev 

John Anderson III 

Kristen Anderson 



Victor Aramayo 

Amy Arnett 

Amanda Ashley 

Mark Aukamp 

Mark Baggett 



Just A Year Aw/ Ay 




For most students at JMU, Jun- 
ior year seemed to be one of the 
most eventful. The uncertainess 
of freshman year and the mo- 
notony of sophomore year gave 
way to the privileges of the long 
awaited junior year. After two 
years at JMU, it was now their 
chance to have a taste of being an 
upperclassmen. 

For many majors, junior year 
was when each student started 
working a lot more in their par- 
ticular studies. Upper level 
courses were now available and 
juniors took advantage of their 
status. Freshman and sophomore 
year were plagued by liberal stud- 



ies courses, not leaving most stu- 
dents totally fulfilled academi- 
cally. By their third year of school, 
most students had finally chosen 
their last major. 

A major event that occured 
during many students junior year, 
was reaching the magical age of 
twenty-one. "My count-down till 
my 21st birthday started three 
months before", commented jun- 
ior Fran Czaja. Twenty-one also 
meant that you were free to go 
almost anywhere you wanted, es- 
pecially places like Atlantic City, 
dance clubs, and local pubs. 

Junior year also meant time to 
buckle up and get serious. With 



only senior year left to act as a 
buffer from the "real world", some 
students panicked. "One day I 
got up and just started writing 
out my resume," said junior Am- 
ity Hovey," I wasn't applying for 
anything, but I did it just in case." 
Junior year proved to be one of 
the strongest years for students, 
helping them understand their 
majors, while at the same time, 
understanding themselves. 
-Joe Olson 

KILLING TIME. Junior Mary Jo 

Ackerman reads The Breeze between 

human communications classes in 

Anthony Seeger. Because juniors took 

upper level classes, they were often seen 

in the same hulidings. 



Leigh Anne Bailey 

Laura Ballou 

Kimberly Balsbaugh 

Jamie Bang 

Chadwick Barbour 



Wendy Bass 

Carolyn Bean 

Mary Elizabeth Beard 

Monica Belcher 

Patrick Belcher 



Michelle Beucler 
Diane Beury 

]. Kim Binbaum 
Chris Blazie 

Michael Booker 



242 J 



uniors 





Betsy Borders 
Richard Bottomleu 
Jody Bradshaw 
Julia Bragg 
Cynthia Brennar\ 



AHson Brown 
Jennifer Brown 
Laura Brown 
Tia Brown 
Jacquie Bruce 





LONG TIME BUDDIES. Juniors Nikki 
Matous and Karen Held enjov spending 
some time together. The two have been 
friends since they were roommates 
freshman year. 




Andrea Bryant 
David Bunting 
LesHe Burns 
Linda Butler 
Clinton Caldwell IV 



Jodi Carney 
Michael Carr 
Tuck Carter 
Melissa Casey 
Kerri Cash 



Raminder Chadha 
Nicole Cheeks 
Pamela Chrisman 
Jeannine Christian 
Donna Christensen 



Juniors 2 ^J 



Jarret Christensen 

Erin Coats 

Brian Cochran 

Jeffrey Cohn 

Courtney Coleman 



Christina Coons 

Candace Corcoran 

Jody Craybas 

Daryl Cronk 

E. Brennan Daly 



Holick 



WINTER FUN. Friends Jenessa Pail and 
Heather Parks down around in each 
others hats and gloves. Sharing 
accesories like these made students 
outfits more versitile. 



NO YOU DON'T!. Shannon Bishop 
objects to Stephanie Tragakis borrow- 
ing her sweater. Roommates and friends 
often expanded their wardrobes by 
borrowing from each other. 




Dan Darabond 

Marcia Daughtry 

Sham Davis 

Stephanie Day 

Angela Deck 



Tara Delaney 

Christy Denslow 

Tracy DiiBon 

Lori Dolby 

Teresa Dowell 



Kimberly Duck 

Edward DuRocher 

Erin Duff 

Marcia Edmundson 

Marcia Edwards 



244 



uniors 





Melanie Edwards 
Lori Elmore 
Michael Erhart 
Claire Ferguson 
Danielle Ferguson 



Debra Flechner 
Kavis Fleming 
Heather Flood 
Kristen Folks 
Ginger Fonzi 



* 




Yours Ai\d Mjine 

3+uaervfs increase meit^ wai^ai^obes by skc\^*i^Ag 



HOICES. Deciding what to choose from 
e closet was often a difficult choice, es- 
?cially whenthere was more than one 
oset to choose from. 



Walking around campus, one 
might hear a person comment to 
their roommate, "Hey, I like your 
shorts - I have a pair just like 
them!" It may not be a genuine 
compliment; more likely than not 
it's playfully sarcastic, for those 
shorts are most likely a borrowed 
item. 

Borrowing clothes, a phenom- 
enon which usually began in high 
school, proliferated during the 
college years. Common mostly 
among females, the high rate of 
borrowing could be attributed to 
the unique living arrangements 
on a college campus. Living in a 
dorm room and having room- 
mates provided for easy access to 



the closets of others. Windsor 
Barnett, a sophomore, said, "Liv- 
ing in a sorority house is the best 
for borrowing clothes because you 
have 28 other closets to look 
through everyday." Jenny 
Howard, a junior who lived in 
Wayland Hall reported, "My 
roommates are very generous 
with their clothes." 

Borrowing clothes was just as 
common off campus as it was on. 
Tracey Rosenburg, a resident of 
Hunter's Ridge, remarked, "I wear 
more of my roommates clothes 
than my own." Kim Sutton, an- 
other student living off campus, 
doesn't borrow quite as often, say- 
ing that she and her roommates 



had very different tastes in clothes. 
Occasionally, however, she would 
borrow something basic, such as 
a blazer. 

Sharing of clothes among males 
was much lower. While some 
guys did wear each other's let- 
ters, their closets were much more 
susceptible to raids by their fe- 
male friends and girlfriends. 

People borrowed clothes for 
many reasons - special occasions, 
limited budgets, variety in ward- 
robe and, an important issue with 
most students, reducing the fre- 
quency of doing laundry. 
-Rebecca Haile 




Tina Fox 
Christina Frey 
Sarah Frith 
Shaun Galang 
Robert Garretson 



Karen Gelfond 
Jeffrey Gilliatt 
Randi Gische 
Robert Goller 
Michael Gower 



Rachel Greer 
Lillian Gregorio 
Bonnie Griffiths 
Allan Grimsley 
Carly Gripper 



Juniors 2 ^5 



Heather Gustin 

Jennifer Hackett 

Randa Haddad 

Jennifer Haddock 

Kimberly Hagy 



Leslie Hagy 

Robyn Hall 

Robin Hammond 

Lori Haralampus 

Tonya Henley 



SiSSi9 



I 




No PARkJNq Here 



T-indii 



It was a necessity. 



fke per 

Unfortu- 
nately, it was very hard to store it. 
All of the good places that were 
not reserved for faculty were so 
far away from campus that stu- 
dents needed a good pair of hik- 
ing boots to make it to class. 

This necessary item,the car, and 
finding a place to park troubled 
students throughout the year. 
There was plenty of parking on 
campus, provided you had a 
purple or red decal. But for stu- 
dents, the availability of parking 
did not meet the demand. Park- 
ing for students was not com- 
pletely adequate. As it was, "a 
student had a better chance of 
finding a reference journal in the 



|ect pat^kit^g place was rveve^* easy 



library than finding a parking 
space during Homecoming Week- 
end," said John Fix. 

On-campus students had the 
pleasure of searching the two resi- 
dent lots for open spaces and gen- 
erally wound up treking across 
campus to retrieve a parked car. 
Those living off campus could 
park close to home, but also had 
to battle the bus system. Said 
Jocelyn Strother, "It's nice that 1 
live off campus because 1 can park 
near where 1 live, but it is a pain to 
have to leave early to find com- 
muter space when there is not 
enough commuter parking, espe- 
cially when you can't trust the 
bus system." 



The lack of commuter parking 
frustrated many students. "It re- 
ally irritates me when I see spaces 
open in the faculty lot across from 
Zane Showker while students 
have to vulture around for spots 
in that miniscule lot that has been 
allocated to students," said Robin 
Parker. 

Unfortunately, there was no 
solution to the parking problem. 
Residential areas were out of the 
question because police ticketed 
those areas. The only answers 
were either to become good 
friends with a faculty member or 
get used to giving the Police De- 
partment $15 checks. 
-Anna Selden 



Tanya High 

Chisa Hino 

Tanya Hipson 

Deana Holsington 

Beth Holler 



Jenny Howard 

Amity Hovey 

Jeffrey Huepper 

Jennifer Hueston 

W. Michael Hunt 



Christy Ivey 

Amber Jaunrubenis 

Ethan Johnson 

Melinda Kastler 

Jill Kautz 



2^(3 Juniors 





Sarah Keeton 
Kristie Kimsey 
Tracy King 
Val Kinkead 
Ellen Kirby 



Kimberly Knight 
Heidi Koeckert 
Kelly Kunclrs 
Nancy Labuguen 
Amy Larson 





NIGHT VIEW. A central parking area, 
the lot in Godwin Hall fills up quickly ■ 
Even at night, the sight of a full parking 
lot was a common one. 



NezL'tJiarj 

DENIED. This sign is known to all 
students as they frantically search for 
spaces when late for class. The lack of 
parking on campus was a major 
complaint of students. 



Robert Lawrence 
Michael Layher 
Joo Lee 

Michael Leedom 
Jennifer LeLacheur 



Michael Leopold 
Kristine Linn 
Charles Livengood 
Tammy Londeree 
Christie Lovelace 



Brian Low^e 
Lisa Lowrie 
Christopher Lupton 
Nathan Lyon 
Amy Maier 



Juniors 2^7^ 



Tonya Mainor 

Lynn Malacane 

Chandra Malson 

Sandra Martello 

Amy Martin 



Tia Mason 

Victoria Mason 

Linh May 

Travis Mayo 

Tina Mazev 



Slif 





(Z-i^&aW cams 

Plastic. How many of us knew 
the relief of pulling out credit 
cards when we were out of cash 
and out of checks? They seemed 
like a saving grace, especially 
when the banking accounts were 
waiting to be replenished before 
we could dip into them. But then 
the bills came in. Eyes bulged and 
voices caught in throats as the 
final billing amount showed its 
ugly little face. "How could it be 
SO MUCH?" we thought. 

Many students, after just a few 
of these instances, decided that 
the cards were costing much more 
than they could afford, so they 
decided to cancel them. Credit 
card companies did not like their 



For EiviERqEiNciEs OnIy 

sovy\e. s+udeK\fs 



>bl 



en^s jov^ 



cause p^*ot 

products being rejected and many 
times "forgot" to cancel them, con- 
tinuing to charge annual fees to 
frustrated students. Many stu- 
dents learned that simply cutting 
up a card did not cancel it. 

When students did not have 
the cards in their possession yet, 
the companies were determined 
to make them new cardholders. 
Early morning phone calls and 
extra mail became more common. 
Students were often kept on the 
phone by sales reps who wanted 
to send that perfect card out with 
the perfect annual fee and perfect 
credit limit to the perfect student. 

For responsible students who 
knew how to keep track of their 



purchases, accepting the cards 
was not a problem. These thin 
little pieces of plastic could help 
build credit, help alleviate cash 
shortages and help make paying 
for really expensive purchases a 
little less stressful, giving us more 
time to find the funds. 

For most students, though, 
credit cards were a wolf in sheep's 
clothing. "I wish I had never got- 
ten my credit card," said Kristi 
Shackelford, "I live in dread of 
the day the bill comes." 

-Tiffani Gobbi 




Megan McAveney 

Kerry McFarland 

Chris McGuffin 

Chandra McKay 

Matthew McLean 



Kara McReynolds 

Joy Meador 

Kathy Meiser 

Amy Mehnert 

Andrea Meredith 



Diane Metzler 

Nicole Michal 

Heather Michels 

Wendy Miles 

Justin Miller 




2 ^^3 Juniors 



I 




Michele Minderlein 
K. Renae Mitchell 
Julie Monrad 
Andrew Monsour 
Ebonee Montgomery 



Sharon Moorefield 
Karla Moreno 
Frank Mulholland 
Heather Mullen 
Kerri Mullins 





BETTER LATE THAN NEVER. The cult 
use of his credit card gets this student in 
trouble. Most students were able to use 
less extreme methods to control their 
spending 



Nru'"ia}t 

CASH ONLY. This student takes 
advantage of using his credit card to get 
a cash advance from the ever popular 
money machine. A credit card could 
eliminate to need for a monev card. 




Jessica Mussinan 
Amy Myers 
Michael Myers 
Eric Nelson 
Laura Nesbitt 



Laura Newbanks 
Eric Newcomb 
Michael Ogilvie 
Mary Olenick 
Jeffrey Oliver 



Kathryn Ouellette 
Shane Parrish 
Jason Parsons 
Michael Parsons 
Emily Peake 



Juniors 2.^9 



J. Blake Peddicord 

Laura Pell 

Brent Peterson 

Sarah Pettit 

Lynette Pikul 



Sarah Pratt 

Janice Quick 

Donna Ragsdale 

Christina Rebich 

Leslie Reed 




MIDNITE 
THURS ■"»»* 



SBACK 
' BALLRM 

AOMISSOM StSO 



SINGLE 



FEMALE 

KtviNasrniiws 

--WOW. 



SHOWTIME. Grafton-Stovall tries to 
show movies that appeal to wide variety 
of people. Going to the movies was a 
good tension easier for students during 
exams. 



ROLL EM! Sophomore Jennifer 
Scguster works the projector at Grafton 
Stovall. She enjoyed her job because, "it 
was fun." 



Deborah Reem 

Cary Reynolds 

Philip Roberts 

Angela Robinson 

Nicole Robinson 



Kimberly Ronald 

Bonnie Rosenblatt 

Matthew Ross 

Karen Rule 

Paul Stanford 



Michael Sarner 

Beverly Savich 

Erin Schumacher 

Matthew Schwabel 

Allison Schweisguth 




25 Juniors 




Brian Scott 

Joshua Seely 
Maria Seidelman 
Susan Sharp 
Richard Sharpe 



Juha Shoemaker 
Maurisa Shyne 
Kevin Simmons 
Victoria Sims 
MeUssa Skasko 




Liqhis, Cameras, ActIon! 



When there seemed to 
be nothing to do in the 'Burg, 
students always found some- 
thing entertaining at Grafton- 
Stovall theater. A favorite 
because of its extremely low 
prices and popular movies, the 
theater provided students with 
a place to go with a group of 
friends or a date. At $1.50 per 
person for a movie and $.50 for 
popcorn, the price was the 
cheapest around. 

Sponsored by the 
University Program Board, 
Grafton-Stovall theater was 
entirely student run. Respon- 
sible for ticket and popcorn 
sales, and running the movie. 



pi^ovides eKv+et^+aii^Kn 

students could work for UPB 
and enjoy the movies for free. 
Part of the appeal to the theater 
was the fact that the movies 
were selected by students that 
worked for UPB. 

Popular hits shown 
included "Batman Returns," 
"Death Becomes Her," and 
"Beauty and the Beast." The 
night before reading day, 
students enjoyed the classic 
"Rocky Horror Picture Show." 
Shown at the traditional mid- 
night hour, this flick gave 
students the chance to celebrate 
the end of classes by singing 
along and joining in the Mon- 
ster Mash. Other popular 



er\t -por students 

favorites were the Holiday 
Classics shown before winter 
break. Student Activities 
sponsored "The Miracle on 34th 
Street" and "It's a Wonderful 
Life" during the last week of 
classes for their holiday week. 
For those students that 
didn't have the money to spend 
at a theater in town, Grafton- 
Stovall provided the perfect 
opportunity for them to escape 
the real world for a few hours. 
Grafton-Stovall was a great 
place to meet friends or run into 
people that weren't in the 
everyday routine. 

-Tiffany Gobbi 




Diron Smith 
Elizabeth Smith 
Emily Smith 
Michael Sphar 
John Stamper 



Kelly Stefanko 
Alicia Stevens 
Bertram Stiff 
Rachel Stouffer 
Christopher Suril 



Carol Swancott 
Alveeta Taylor 
Camellia Taylor 
James Taylor Jr. 
Alane Tempchin 



Juniors 23 ^ 



PersonaIIzecI PIates 



<///// ////////// tt§iim\ 



Two things were evident while 
strolhng through the parking lots 
of JMU. The first was the lack of 
parking spaces and the second 
was the abundance of personal- 
ized license plates that could be 
found identifying the many cars 
there. Personalized license plates 
were an easy, inexpensive way to 
add humor, creativity and per- 
sonality to a car. 

The ideas going into the plates 
varied from a person's initials, to 
their sport, to a creative phrase 
that could be represented in the 
alloted seven letters. Freshman 
Kitty Dunman simply put 
KITSTER on her car, and senior 
Tom Speiss had GO DINO on his, 
for former Washington Capital's 
star hockey player Dino Cicerelli. 
An unidentified car's license plate 



read ARTSY ME, for an obvious 
art student. LNGNOKR adorned 
senior Mike Allred's license plate 
proclaiming his interest in the 
sport of golf. 

The popularity of the plates 
stemmed in part from the inex- 
pensiveness of obtaining them. 
The plates only costed $10 per 
year over the cost of regular plates. 
In addition to choosing your own 
letters, students had an opportu- 
nity to place their chosen saying 
on special JMU plates. The uni- 
versity would get a small amount 
of the money of the sale of these 
plates. 

-Rob Singer 



PERSONALIZED. These are examples 

of the various hcense plates of JMU 

students. 





Scott Thompson 

Stephanie Thompson 

Barbara Thorne 

Kerri Tilghman 

Robert Toomer 



Heather Turnbow 

Michele Turpin 

Svein Varhaugvik 

Kristi Via 

Andrew Vought 



Andrea Wagner 

Kimberly Walsh 

Valerie Walsh 

Brian Webb 

Janet Wenzel 



232 Juniors 




¥' IIIIIIV 





Elizabeth K. Westley 
Katie Wethman 
Melinda White 
Chris Whitlow 
Shanell Whitney 



Christopher Williams 
Lori Williamson 
Rhonda Wilson 
Monica Windley 
Rochelle Wingert 



Tracy Wong 
Sandra Woodin 
Tarsha Woods 
Christine Worontzoff 
Jenny Wynn 



Juniors 2-53 



Kimberly Yager 

Barbara Yarnell 

Sheri Yoho 

Kristin Zempolich 

Tiffany D. Acors 



Jin S. Aim 

Wendy C. Albert 

Patricia E. Anderson 

Amelia J. Armendariz 

Deninne A. Arnold 




TiiE Year of ChoicEs 

Sopl\oir\oi*^ year is j-ull oj decisiorvs 




Sophomore year was a year of 
change for most students. No 
longer the youngest, but not yet 
an upperclassmen, sophomores 
were at a point of indecision. 
However, this did not stop sopho- 
mores from throughly enjoying 
their second year of college. 

During their sophomore year, 
most students decided on their 
majors and began taking the 
classes that interested them . A 
move away from the required lib- 
eral studies and towards subjects 
more concentrated in their ma- 
jors gave most sophomores a more 
challengeing ciriculm than before. 
"I have to study a lot more this 



year than last," said sophomore 
Amy Shellenberger,"because I 
want to do well in the classes that 
are my major." 

Sophomores also had the 
choice of living either on-campus 
or off. Living on came with the 
advantage of having seniority to 
decide where and with you you 
would live. In addition, many 
sophomores were able to finally 
bring their cars to school. Some 
sophomores elected to becom resi- 
dent advisors. Those that had had 
enough of fire drills and D-Hall 
food had the option of moving 
into an apartment or a house. The 
move off-campus was a popular 



choice and most students were 
pleased with their decision. "I love 
living off-campus," said sopho- 
more Jeff Gothelf. "You couldn't 
pay me to live on campus again." 

Sophomores also had the ad- 
vantage of priority over incom- 
ing freshmen when it came to reg- 
istration. "It was a pleasant change 
to register and still find some 
classses open," siad sophomore 
Kim Bennet. 

The endless choices and 
changes made the sophomore 
year one to remember. 

-Kristi Shackelford 



Barbara V. Awvakye 

Brett B. Baier 

Shannon K. Bailey 

Randi G. Baker 

Christine R. Baldwin 



Kristen N. Balint 

Holly A. Barraclough 

Robert H. Barton 

Kristen L. Baumann 

Stephen T. Bazarnick 



Samantha A. Beares 

William E. Beasley 

Kara L. Beckman 

Danielle M. Behrman 

Carrie L. Blumenthal 




£^^^ Sophomores 




Catherine L. Boezer 
Amy E. Bond 
Aimee M. Bowen 
Renee L. Bradley 
Emily C. Brandt 



Laura C. Braz 
Margaret E. Brock 
Avery L. Brown 
Kevin Bucher 
Rachel Bunyard 





CHEESE! Sophomore Sarah Coggins 
hangs out in her room in Shorts Hall, a 
predominately sophomore dorm. 
Sophomores often chose to remain on 
campus and live with friends. 



COUCH POTATOES. Sophomores 
Uman Bakshi and Sam Zizzi enjoy 
watching television in their apartment. 
Friends that met their freshman year 
often lived together the next. 




Wendy L. Burkhammer 
Jennifer L. Butler 
Cheryl A. Carr 
Kimberly A. Casserly 
Nicole Chafitz 



Brian S. Chaplow 
Lisa M. Cherry 
Jennifer L. Clark 
Tricia A. Clark 
Kathleen R. Claxton 



Christin E. Cogley 
Aleeta D. Coleman 
Lashawn M. Coleman 
Mark E. Collins 
Stephanie L. Concodor 



Sophomores 255 



On T[he ProwI 

X^ke pet^fect dcxfe. was Kcl^*d to jirvd 



With their schedules 
filled with assignments to 
complete, meetings to attend 
and friends to catch up with, 
dating was not always on the 
forefront of the JMU student's 
mind. 

Even students with 
serious significant others had to 
make an effort to allot time for 
romance and dating throughout 
the school year. It wasn't that 
JMU students were not inter- 
ested in romance, but time and 
money constraints made 
conventional dating a challenge. 

Many students saved 
their dating for special occa- 
sions, such as birthdays and 

FLIRTING AS USUAL. Sarah Coggins 
dances with Patrick Belcher, someone 
else's date, at the CCM semi-formal. To 
add a little spunk to dates, some couples 
swapped partners for a song or two. 



anniversaries. Local restau- 
rants such as Pargo's and 
Clayborne's were popular for 
dinner plans. "Clayborne's was 
the perfect atmosphere for a 
first date, comfortably romantic 
but not to intimate," said 
sophomore Mike Everton. 
Tully's was also frecjuented by 
daters, because of its romantic 
fireplaces and atmosphere. 
After dinner, some 
opted for movies, either the 
theaters in Valley Mall or rented 
from local stores. "I would 
rather rent a movie and stay in 
than go out," said senior Joey 
Yates. Other occasions for 
dates included formals and 



semi-formals sponsored by 
groups ranging from sororities 
and fraternities to religious 
organizations. These events 
gave students a chance to spend 
time with that special someone 
as well as with their friends. 

Other more creative 
people ventured to sites such as 
Massanutten for skiing or to 
Skyline Drive for a picnic. 
Thus, although dates may have 
been few and far between for 
JMU students, they did exist, 
and were as diverse as the 
students here at Madison. 

-Heather Gustin 





Jenna L. Conner 

Patrick A. Connolly 

Amy G. Conroy 

Melissa A. Converse 

Jennifer O. Cooper 



Kimberly A. Copeland 

James A. Cordovana 

Elyse L. Costello 

Kelli A. Crawford 

Colleen M. Crowley 



Maureen Cunneen 

Matthew F. Cyr 

Franklin Dam 

Valerie D. Daniel 

Richard W. Day 














2 '3 6 Sophomores 




ONE LUMP OR TWO. Juniors Betsy 
Cassidy and Thomas Krebs sip coffee at 
the Artful Dodger. This new coffee 
house added a quaint and romantic 
touch to d.ites 



A BIG SQUEEZE. Seniors Emily 
D'amato and Jason Jones enjoy an 
evening at JM's Pub and Deli. Although 
for from quiet and intimate, JM's was a 

popular ami fun datinj; spot. 




Cuilfoyh 




Timothy A. Day 
Bridget M. Deel 
Rayne R. Dennis 
Caroline A. DeSantis 
Lloyd A. Dickenson 



Kristin L. Dietel 
Shenda R. Dillahunt 
Janet C. Dillon 
Melissa M. Dodson 
Michael J. Dolan 



Jennifer L. Donnelly 
Kimberly C. Dougherty 
Chad M. Dunham 
Andrea S. Earle 
Clifford C. Eichler 



Sophomores 2 '5 T' 




what's Sexy 



r 



•|-le says: 









STYLIN' Sophomore Jon Glisch strikes a 
pose before leaving for the Eagle Hall 
formal. Most women agreed that men in 
formal attire were sexy. 

HOT, HOT, HOT. Friends Jen Toben, Jill 
Johnson, Beth Dubicki, Kirsta Rauch and 
Elizabeth Wayland spend some time in 
the Bahamas over Spring Break. Women 
in bikinis were always popular with the 
guys. 




Everybody knows what it is, 
everybody wants to be it and ev- 
erybody has their own opinion 
about it. Now it's time for the 
experts to share their knowledge 
about what is sexy. 

*baseball caps 

*sweats (better inside-out) 

*jeans 

*health conscious 

*spunky 

*girls who can dance 

*straight hair 

*speaking your mind 

*hugs 

*fresh out of the shower 

*intenigence 

*adult but can be a kid when it 
is time to have fun 

The best look for this year is a 
plaid pleated red skirt about 1 .5- 
3 inches above the knee, worn 
with a plain silk or cotton blouse 
and a cardigan. 



Sh^ says! ; 

The men had two chances with) ' ft 
the women: a clean-cut, good bo}[ * 
look or the sexy rebel air. Overall, ! V 
woman either liked the boy with jiB 
looks, charm and a dashing smik; 
or the rustic, artsy witty guy. 



*baseball caps 

*long hair (well groomed) 

*George Michael /scruffy 

*looks at you when talking 

*good smile— smiles a lot 

*willing to dance 

*creative dates and outings 

*talent 

*sense of humor 

*smells good 

*flexibility 

^gentlemanly without being 
sexist 

The look preferred by women 
was one that expressed confi 
dence with out an attitude and 
dressing for yourself. Ties with' 
shorts and boxers were favorites 



\ 






rel 



i«i\ 



William B. Eley 

Carla S. Emore 

Lisa M. Engel 

Cynthia L. Ensley 

Stephanie L. Erb 



Scott A. Evins 

Kathryn M. Farmer 

Amanda C. Fawcett 

Rachel Fikremariam 

Becca L. Fisher 



Terri L. Fleming 
Tiffany D. Flora 
Jennifer A. Ford 
Ashley L. Foster 
Brian A. Fox 



258 Soph 



omores 




WfiAT's Not SExy 



+-|e says; 



Ske says! 



OUT OF STYLE. These Lambda Chi 
brothers prepare for a seventies party at 
their house. In general, the bell bottoms 
and afros of the past were best forgot- 
ten. 



The anorexic runway model Overall, the women surveyed 

was not the woman to date but could find a good characteristic 

the well rounded intellectual and in any guy, but there were a few 

physical equal was the one to go things that women were 

after. However, be wary of the overwelmingly opposed to. Here 

attributes can kill the chemistry: are a few: 



*bad teeth 
*judgemental 
*too quiet 
*playing games 
*forever dieting 
*always want to fight 
*jeans tucked into socks 
*too wide belts 
*telling dirty jokes 
*spandex 
*jealous girls 



*body odor 

*long, nappy hair 

*stingy 

*sideburns 

*rudeness 

*goatees 

*wishy-washy 

*hitting on all the girls around 

*unkempt appearance 

*talking only about self 

*drunk/ stoned too often 



The worst look for a woman Campuses across the country 

was the funky, flower printed leg- raged with the latest styles, yet 

gings with a heavy, drooping to JMU was most concerned, not 

the mid-thigh sweater because it with the recent trends, but classic 

destroyed the shape of a woman's good looks and charm. 

^°'^y- -Sarah Allen and 

-K. Scott Renyolds Colleen Magin 





K2Plir 



f^^ 





Heidi S. Frank 
Amy L. Fratkin 
Stacey A. Friedl 
Katherine V. Fries 
Christopher W. Fuller 



Kristin L. Fuller 
Carolyn E. Gagnon 
Yolanda E. Gawlik 
Erin M. Geddes 
Amy Lynn Gibson 



Christina L. Gibson 
Bonnie C. Gifford 
Lori Gollayan 
Alicea N. Goode 
Tamara B. Goorevitz 



Sophomores ^Z)y 



Donna L. Goss 

Douglas G. Granger 

Elizabeth A. Gross 

Nancy C. Gross 

Rachel L. Gustafson 



Heather E. Hales 

Christine L. Hall 

Jennifer L. Harlow 

Christina M. Harris 

Karen E. Harris 





WM^^, 



HaU CouNcil 

S+udervts work to Kelp tke^rvselves 



From the moment your hall 
director told you you won, a feel- 
ing of pride took over. You did it! 
The speech and numerous post- 
ers you put up worked. But then 
came a feeling of uneasiness. What 
have you done? You've set your- 
self up for a lot of responsibility — 
and fun. 

Besides the weekly meetings, 
hall council members put in a lot 
of extra hours. From the leader- 
ship workshop by IHC in Septem- 
ber to holiday parties to dances 
with other halls, hall council mem- 
bers became experts at planning, 
last minute emergencies and also 
at dealing with responsibility. 
Frederickson's UCO representa- 



tive Molly Conlon stated, "I'm 
responsible for relaying informa- 
tion from the class to the hall. If 1 
didn't attend the weekly meet- 
ings, the residents wouldn't know 
what's going on and participa- 
tion would be significantly 
lower." 

Participation was a major fac- 
tor for hall councils when plan- 
ning events. One of the main goals 
of the councils were to plan social 
and educational events that the 
residents would enjoy. Many 
councils stated apathy as their 
major problem. To combat this 
unwillingness to participate, hall 
council members used their cre- 
ativity to come up with original 



activities. In Converse Hall, Presi- 
dent Jenna Conner respondeti, 
"We distributed surveys to the 
hall residents to find out what 
they were interested in doing. We 
went over all the surveys and be- 
cause of that, our resident turn- 
out was good." 

Throughout the year, hall coun- 
cil members learned to work as a 
team to pull off their activities. 
Conner stated that "the key to 
success is planning ahead." Yet 
hall council is not all work. And 
from the smiles on hall council 
members faces, everyone knows 
the work is worth it. 

-Shannon Bailey 



Carrie L. Hartley 

Erica L. Hawley 

Katina M. Hayden 

Mary T. Hayes 

Virginia A. Henry 



Corey L. Herd 

Kent M. Herr 

Kate Hibbert 

Jennifer A. Hill 

Chandra L. Hohert 



Jennifer L. Homer 

John N. Hong 

David A. Horton 

Mary N. Houchens 

Jennifer K. Howard 




2.60 Soph 



omores 




Rebecca A. Howdyshell 
Elizabeth A. Howell 
Jessica M. Hubley 
Katherine A. Hughes 
Laura L. Hurst 



Karl F. Hutchinson 
Wendi J. Jackson 
James A. Johnson 
Jennifer M. Johnson 
Jennifer L. Jones 





Cmlfai/lc 



STANDING TALL. Kathleen Markel 
Calay Jaynes, Dave Caldwell and Amy 
Cannon compose Gifford's Hall Council. 
All over campus, hall councils learned 
to work as a team to organize creative 
dorm activites. 



SWEET MUSIC. Amy Stone and 
Converse's Public Service representative 
Susan Walker entertain residents by 
playing a flute duet at a holiday party. 
Hall Council members brought their 
individual talents to their hall's activities. 




Robert C. Jones 
Jacqueline L. Kauffman 
Kimberly A. Keffer 
Matt B. Keister 
Tamara S. Kelsey 



Cybil G. Kendrick 
Kristin L. Kennedy 
Mallory C. Kilcoyne 
Teri Kim 
Usha Koduru 



Katherine M. Kramer 
Kimberly D. Kreitz 
Jennifer A. Kucinskis 
Heather M. Kuhl 
David S. Kwon 



Sophomores 



261 



Cheryl A. LaComb 

C. Courtney Lambert 

Amy D. Lancaster 

Lori LaRocco 

Quoc K. Le 



M. Scott Lea 

Myung Sil Lee 

Valerie H. Leighton 

Kim R. LeSage 

Emily I. Levenson 





MISSING YOU. Senior Regina Oelrich 
talks to her boyfriend who does not 
attend JMU. For those in a long- 
distance relationship, the telephone was 
often the only means to communicating 
with one's significant other 



COMMUNICATION GAP. Freshman 
Kalias Muhammad works to resolve a 
miscommunication with his girlfriend in 
Porfsmith, VA. Relating on the 
telephone proved to be difficult for 
some couples. 




AUyson M. Lewis 

Christopher C. Liles 

Merideth Linberger 

Bradi P. Littrell 

Tanya M. Llewellyn 



Carolyn J. Loughry 

Mark C. Lundblad 

Paul W. Lutz 

Rebekah C. Lynard 

Stephen A. Mackinnon 



Nettie Y. Mahone 

Francie Makris 

Suleman Malik 

Thomas O. Manning 

Anne E. Marriott 




262 Sophomores 



I 




Jennifer N. Martin 
Roland R. Massa 
Tricia M. McConnell 
Elizabeth A. McCormack 
Jerry E. McCormick, Jr. 



Kevin M. McGrath 
Shelly A. McMinn 
Catherine R. McNeill 
Jennifer M. Meade 
Heather L. Meeuwissen 




LoiNq^ DISTANCE RElAiioiNships 



Absence makes the heart grow 
fonder, and for many couples 
separated from each other by 
miles, absence made the phone 
bills grow larger. Whether it was 
a girl or boy friend back home, at 
another school or in the military, 
being separated was a trial for all 
those involved. 

Long-distance relationships 
were common among students in 
all classes. Freshman left their 
high school sweethearts and se- 
niors often dated graduates that 
had left for the real world. For 
those couples who had gone 
through separation before, the 
loneliness was difficult but not 
unexpected. "1 just miss him a 



ow loKvg can fKey las 

lot," said junior Barbara Kamm 
of her boyfriend of five years. 

For those experiencing long- 
distance love for the first time, the 
separation could be unbearable. 
Those couples who were only a 
few hours apart and had cars had 
the option of road-tripping on 
weekends. Others separated by 
too many miles for frequent trips 
looked forward to breaks to spend 
some quality time together. 

The worst part of some long- 
distance love affairs was the 
phone bill. "I dreaded getting my 
phone bill at first," said sopho- 
more Kristi Shackelford, "but then 
I started making my boyfriend 



t? 

call me all the time instead." Some 
had been known to have reached 
$300; but most couples controlled 
themselves, using letters and the 
VAX as alternate modes of com- 
municating. 

The separation got easier as 
the year progressed, and many 
couples saw it as a test of the 
strength of the relationship. Those 
couples who were lucky enough 
to make it through the year were 
those who used separation as a 
means of getting closer. Ah, love 
is strange. 

-Tiffany Gobbi 




Michael A. Melzer 
Jennifer L. Metzger 
Kenneth H. Meyri 
Kimberly D. Miller 
Lisa N. Miller 



Mark C. Mitchell 
Jennifer A. Moeller 
Amy L. Montgomery 
David L. Mooney 
Lori A. Moore 



Sandra P. Moscoso 
Nicole D. Motley 
Stacie D. Moukas 
Carole K. Myers 
David T. Myrick 



Sophomores 2^3 



TiiviE TO Eat 



SfudekAfs kad van 

JMU had a generous variety of 
options for on-campus dining. D- 
Hall was the main cafeteria, Dukes 
was the choice for fast food and 
Pepe's , Mrs. Green's and the 
Steakhouse were specialty op- 
tions. 

D-Hall was the largest and 
most social of the available facili- 
ties. Students often chose D-Hall 
over the other dining options be- 
cause of the cafeteria-style, all- 
you-can-eat format. Within the 
round cafeteria were the Main 
Event, featuring a different meal 
each day; American Pie, serving 
hamburgers and hot dogs; Sand- 
wich City, featuring the makings 
for sandwiches; Lifeline, with veg- 
etarian options; and Mama Mia's, 
offering Italian food. 

Dukes was great for students 
that were on the run. Everything 
was easy to order and pick-up 
within minutes. They also fea- 
tured ready made salads and 
sandwiches for those that were 
really in a hurry. Students that ate 
off-campus often went to Dukes 
anyway to use their punches to 
buy drinks and chips. Burgers and 
fires, soup and steakums, pizza 
and cookies were all favorites. 

The smaller specialty services 
were as popular as the larger 
facilites. Pepe's had mexican food 
and Mrs. Greens had salad and 



ous diiaing opfiorvs 

bread with a soup of the day. Each 
of these dining options were 
smaller and conducive to conver- 
sation during lunch. The only com- 
plaint about these two concerned 
the long line that usually formed 
each day at noon. 

Mrs. Green's also offered break- 
fast. There was always a selection 
of fresh bagles and gourmet coffee. 
Also available were cereal, break- 
fast pastries and fresh fruit. 

Steakhouse was the most classy 
option in the style of a restraunt 
complete with tablecloths, candles, 
waitservice and reservations. Steak 
and chicken were the selections 
and dessert was always generous. 
A vegetarian option was added 
recently to meet the requests of 
students. 

Most students were satisfied 
with the variety of services. Among 
college meal plans, JMU's rated 
highest. With so many choices, stu- 
dents could enjoy a differnt style 
meal in a different atmosphere each 
day of the week. 

-Carrie Desmond 



MAY I HELP YOU? Sophomore Sherry 
Gowell takes orders at the burger Hne in 
Dukes. Good food and quick service 
was an incentive for students to choose 
Dukes over D-Hall. 




Leonard B. Navitskis 

Emily K. Norman 

Kerry A. O'Connor 

Jonathan M. O'Dette 

Deana M. Olech 



Jeannie L. Palmer 

Hae-Jung Park 

Ida C. Paxton 

Kerry A. Payne 

Claire S. Pedigo 



Jamie L. Pegher 

Wendy L. Peko 

Jill C. Perkins 

April S. Peterson 

Marcia L. Peterson 




2 O ^ Sophomores 



I 



TASTY. Sherrie Larowe samples some 
chocolate chip cookies from P.C. Dukes. 
The cookies were popular take home 
items at the campus fast food restaurant 



FANCY FEASTING. These Gibbons 
Hall employees dish out Maine lobster 
for parents weekend. It was D-Hall at its 
best serving a rare treat for students. 





Jennifer L. Phillips 
Kristen M. Phillips 
Hueminh V. Phung 
Rebecca L. Pickett 
Michael D. Pickles 



Jennifer A. Pilch 
Jennifer L. Plocek 
Cindy M. Potanka 
Dara C. Pouchet 
Michelle R. Propst 



Laura E. Quinn 
Steven R. Railey 
Anna Lisa Ramos 
Scott A. Ramsey 
H. Shana Rascoe 



Sophomores ^O^ 



=11^ 



SMALL TALK. David Harrington and 
his friend discuss an amusing anecdote 
after class on ped plaza. Pedestrian 
plaza was a popular spot for students 
to coru'egate after class. 




SHARE A LAUGH. Friends Jenna 
Conner and Shannon Bailey joke at a 
Converse hall council meeting. Friends 
often joined groups and organizations 
together. 



Jennifer E. Reed 

Suzann G. Regetz 

Stacey C. Reilly 

Dina I. Relan 

Erin M. Rettig 



Jonathan K. Rhudy 

Amy K. Riley 

Katie J. Rivers 

Coletta M. Roalf 

Roberta A. Roberts 



Brian J. Robilotta 

Shannon M. Rodney 

Karen C. Roets 

Babette M. Rogol 

Jodie E. Rolls 




2o6 Sophomores 




CLOWNING AROUND. Friends Mr. 
Tom and Swervyn Mervyn take a break 
from their show on WXJM. Friends with 
similar interests often became involved 
in the same activities. 



LIGHTING UP. Friends and roommates 
Heather Glauner and Erin Roche 
prepare to go to the tree lighting. Like a 
few other students, these two were put 
together as freshman and chose to live 
together the next year. 



ThROuqh It All 

College frieKvds last a lofetiirve 
One of the best rewards of col 



lege was the creation of wonder- 
ful friendships. Four years of 
shared work and play under our 
own rules brought students close 
together as they learned how to 
live with friends. Late night talks, 
shared secrets and close living 
quarters created bonds that 
couldn't be broken. 

Freshman year was the year of 
meeting new people. Everyday, 
students inevitably made a new 
acquantance. Rapports became 
friendships as it became obvious 
common interests and mutual 
friends would link certain indi- 
viduals. "1 met some of my best 
friends my freshman year of col- 
lege," said senior Tracy Wilson. 
"That cliche about the friends you 
meet in college being your closest 
really was true." 

Sophomore year was the year 




to cement those friendships and 
really get to know one another. 
Many sophomores met new 
friends that they decided to live 
with the next year. Suites and 
apartment complexes filled with 
groups of friends. Greeks often 
pledged during their second year 
atJMU. Membership in a sorority 
or fraternity was a great opportu- 
nity to meet new friends. 

Junior and senior years stu- 
dents were completely at ease as 
the upperclassmen. Friendships 
were strong as classmates shared 
the pressures of facing career de- 
cisions and graduation. 

All through college, one thing 
that remained constant was 
friends. Friends relied on each 
other for support and understand- 
ing and simple good times. 

-Carrie Desmond 




Karen M. Rowe 
Charles C. Rushing 
Leslie M. Sadoff 
Lori A. Salins 
DeHavilland Samuels 



Rasdeep S. Sandhu 
Couri C. Saunders 
Leesa Sawyer 
Craig A. Schilpp 
Cynthia A. Schmitt 



Bridget C. Schaefer 
Ryan B. Schoenfeld 
Jenni M. Scott 
Karen A. Segermark 
Susan L. Seidnitzer 



Sophomores ^(D f 



Erik D. Sellin 

Brian R. Senatore 

Kevin L. Shackelford 

Khursha B. Sheikh 

Wayne R. Shelton 



Angela J. Sheppard 

Hunter B. Shriner 

Amy L. Sieberkrob 

William D. Sisler 

Kathrvn L. Slonaker 



ThE MoRNiNq AFter 



Was if ^*ea 

It begins with these famous last 
words. .."I'll never drink again." 
Virtually all students have mut- 
tered this line at one time or an- 
other. The headaches, the cotton- 
mouth and the queasy stomachs 
are the inevitable outcomes of a 
night of wild parties. Unfortu- 
nately, the morning after never 
felt as good as the night before. 

The hangover goes hand in 
hand with the drinking. Some- 
times they are worse than others 
and they often seem to come on 
the most inappropriate days. 
Hunter Williams cities as his worst 
hangover memory "the day 1 had 
two tests — Calculus and His- 
tory." 

Students have many "Hang- 



y vvot^fK it? 
over Helpers." A couple of Advil 
and a tall glass of water is the 
common cure. Some students use 
more unique remedies. "Three 
beers and some watermelon is a 
good hangover cure," states John 
Kilpatrick. Often students 
avoided a hangover altogether by 
staying in bed for most of the day. 

For those who might have had 
a little too much for the night 
before, the morning may have 
begun with the "Walk of Shame." 
Sorry — no quotes available! 

Despite the pains of the morn- 
ing after, a night of crazy partying 
was well worth it for JMU stu- 
dents. 

-Beth Anne Howie 



Melisa L. Smith 

Steve R. Smith, Jr. 

Danelle M. Smoker 

John B. Sobieray 

Kirsten Speca 



Jeramy K. Spitzer 

Ethan Sprissler 

Sonya A. Sterbenz 

Jennifer D. Sternberg 

Kristen J. Stevens 



Jennifer L. Stimpson 

Richard F. Strahley 

Jennifer A. Streit 

Lori D. Strottman 

Megan S. Sturges 




2.63 Soph 



omores 



i 



r^-^F^ 





F".^iik^ 





Jenny F. Sun 
Lisa A. Szlachtianshyn 
Leigh B. Taylor 
Tonya R. Temple 
Patricia L. Thomasson 



Jill A. Thurston 
Susan M. Toewe 
Cheryl J. Trent 
Ben M. Tsuchitani 
Robn L. Underwood 




OUT LIKE A LIGHT. The prcv lous late 
night takes its toll on this sleepy 
student. Students alseep in hallways or 
empty classes were a common sight. 



Wilhanif 

STAY THE NIGHT. Parties often lead to 
more intimate gatherings. Students 
frequently used parties and other 
gatherings to meet new people. 



LONG WAY HOME. An unknown" 
female makes her way down Greek Row 
after a night of partying. This stroll 
home in the morning was commonly 
referred to as the "Walk of Shame." 




Gwendolyn F. VanCleef 
Christina A. Walsh 
Douglas C. Weller 
Kim N. Weitzenhofer 
Amy C. Welsch 



Susan L. Werner 
Carl T. West 
Candy L. White 
Winifred V. White 
Aaron E. Williams 



Katrina M. Widder 
Jennifer A. Williams 
Karen L. Willis 
Rachel J. Winer 
Alison R. Winter 



Sophomores ^O"/ 



Marni M. Wire 

Kenneth K. Wong 

Celeste A. Young 

Jason W. Adkins 

Michelle I. Ahn 



Telly H. Albrite 

Lori K. Alexander 

Ann-Marie S. Alford 

Michelle L. Allen 

Scott R. Allison 





^ / O Freshmen 




GETTING AQUAINTED. Freshmen Jim 
Moye, Tiffany Miller, Blaine Goodloe 
and Ryan Phillips hang out in D-Hall. 
Most students agreed that meeting new 
people was the best part of their 
freshman year. 



HARDLY WORKING. Freshman Barry 
Clark studies at his desk in his dorm 
room. Many freshman were surprised 
by the amount of reading and home- 
work assigned by their professors. 



4 >^ 



Melissa M. Anderson 

Tom Anglin 

Wendy M. Arobogast 

Brian R. Armel 

Samantha J. Arnette 



Antoinette M. Barner 

Keesha M. Barrows 

Daniel M. Barton 

Stacy M. Beard 

Holly S. Beasley 



Matthew R. Beland 

Joy M. Bellamy 

Whitney E. Benson 

Heather A. Betts 

Timothy A. Biggins 




I 




Lisa L. Blosser 
Karen M. Bosserman 
James F. Bost 
Katherine F. Bradbury 
Christina C. Breen 



Mary R. Brizendine 
Andera R. Brown 
Lee S. Bumgarner 
Joy E. Burke 
Jorie B. Burkman 




ThE LEqENcJARy Fjrst Year 



From getting lost trying to find 
classes to making that first walk 
of shame home from a fraternity 
party, one's freshman year was 
filled with new experiences. Some 
found their first taste of freedom 
from parental supervision a bit 
intimidating, while others found 
their newfound liberties exhila- 
rating. 

One of the first major college 
experiences was meeting new 
friends. The first encounter with 
new roommates and suitemates 
was usually awkward, but most 
found they became fast friends or 
at least learned to tolerate each 
other. Together, the new fresh- 
man made their way toward D- 



yne.n Iea^*^^ +o live on +K 
Hall. Unfortunately, the food at 
D-Hall and the other campus din- 
ing facilities introduced the new 
students to another facet of col- 
lege life. ..the freshman 15. Those 
added pounds led freshmen to 
another campus facility. ..the 
wellness center for work-outs. 

Another realization that came 
quickly was that, unlike high 
school, college students were not 
required to attend all of their 
classes. Instead of being under 
the supervision of their parents, 
the only people they had to an- 
swer to were their resident advi- 
sors. This new luxury led to sleep- 
ing through classes, and often con- 
tinued until the mid-term grades 



ei>* own 

caused a rude awakening and 
brought about the realization that 
it might really be in his or her best 
interest to roll out of bed for that 
8 a.m. class. 

An increase in partying was a 
hallmark of most student's fresh- 
man year. Although not every- 
one drank at parties, almost ev- 
eryone enjoyed the social aspects 
at JMU. For those who did drink, 
they quickly learned their limits 
after they woke up with pound- 
ing headaches and vague memo- 
ries of embarrassing moments. 
These were just a few of the un- 
forgettable times that filled a JMU 
student's freshman year. 
-Heather Gustin 



Alyssa R. Burnette 
Meghan E. Bury 
Aaron W. Butler 
Jeffrey W. Caines 
Kerry F. Callahan 



Jason D. Carlin 
Katherine E. Carpenter 
Rebecca C. Carriker 
Todd W. Catlett 
Matthew C. Chang 



Jennifer G. Chapman 
Sharon E. Chewning 
April I. Childress 
Lauren E. Cogswell 
Megan B. Collie 



Freshmen 



271 



A DiffEREiNT Kii\d Of REAdiiNq Day 



Despite tke last minivfe ck 



s+udenfs 



In the past, it was given to stu- 
dents with the intention that they 
would use the extra time to pre- 
pare forthegrueHing weekahead. 
A week of finals, that is. The day 
in question was given a rather 
studious, hard-working name — 
Reading Day. 

While the administration had 
one thing in mind, the students 
had another. "Reading Day is a 
good to catch up on sleep and get 
ready for the next week. It's like 
the last party day of the semes- 
ter," said senior Nancy Trent. 

Other students felt the name, 
Reading Day, did not exactly 
match what people did. "What a 



concept. I don't know anyone 
who actually read on this day. I 
like to go to the mountains and 
rest up for all of the upcoming 
days when I will be reading," 
said junior Matt Schwable. 

This year, things changed a 
little. Reading Day was always 
the Friday before exams started 
on Saturday. However, due to a 
large amount of snow that ren- 
dered most schools and busi- 
ness in the area closed, Reading 
Day was moved to Thursday 
and Thursday's classes held Fri- 
day. An announcement that 
came over WXJM at 6:00 Thurs- 
day morning told sleepy stu- 




e.y\joy mei^* day ojj 

dents to go back to bed, there 
would be no classes that day. 

While some students were 
pleased to have the day off to play 
in the snow, not everybody was 
thrilled with the last minute 
change. "I had been up all night 
working on an assignment that 
was due on Thursday," said se- 
nior Scott Renyolds. "When I 
found out I didn't have to go to 
class, I was angry that I had been 
up all night for no reason." 

Despite the sudden change, 
most students would not give up 
the opportunity to party all night 
and sleep all day. 

-Anna Seldon and 
Kristi Shackelford 




GOTCHA! These students take 
advantage of their day off and the 
year's first snowfall. Most students 
used Reading Day to play instead of 
to study. 



AMtUidi'. 





GOING DOWNHILL. These """"• 
students play outside their dorm. 
The temptation to put off studying 
was hard to resisit. 

HARD AT WORK. William Wan and 
Jay Cola vita study in their respective 
rooms. Some students were forced to 
study on Reading Day because they 
had Saturday History exams. 



M/iyiii 



Kristina H. Corzine 

Blair E. Copen 

Wendy E. Costello 

Jacqueline R. Crisci 

Thomas J. Damianos 



Susan M. Danewitz 

Brandy L. Daugherty 

Amy C. Derr 

Nicole A. Dererman 
Jennifer R. Dickerson 



Alissa L. Dionazio 

Douglas G. Divers 

Sophia B. Dobbs 

Zachary L. Donnini 

Alice M. Donohoe 




^ f ^ Freshmen 





Holick 
OUT OF MY WAY! This student 
relieves the tension of his exams by 
sledding. The combination of a free day 
and the snow made it impossible for 
many students to study. 

CRAMMING. Junior John Gordon and 
senior Aaron Williams do some last 
minute studying in the Warren Campus 
Center. Students often studied in the 
airport lounge on Reading Day due to 
the excessive crowds in the library. 



itoyi'- 




James P. Doran 
Beth A. Drory 
Richard C. Dunbar 
Christine N. Duty 
Jill K. Duvall 



Kathryn A. Edwards 
Heather L. Egan 
Christopher Ellingsen 
Laura E. Ellis 
Holly A. Everitt 



Laura K. Ewing 
Christie L. Fariss 
Jonathan E. Fiencke 
Ray D. Firestone 
Katrina R. Fisher 



Freshmen ^ / j 



Karen M. Flannery 

Kristen P. Fleshood 

Diana L. Frederick 

Debra E. Frutchey 

Jenny M. Frye 



Elaine F. Fullerton 

Brian P. Fulmer 

Jennifer L. Gaver 

Christine L. Gecoma 

Marie Gibbon 



WHO ORDERED THIS? The delivery 
man from JM's attempts to read the 
name on his sub delivery- JM's delivery 
people were common sights around 
town on their motor scooters. 



PIZZA ANYONE? Papa Johns delivery 
woman Lois Tuckman brings a snack 
break to some students in the dorms. 
Delivery people were a familiar sight to 
many students at all hours of the day or 
night. 



Christopher C. Giesler 

Scott J. Gilbert 

Linda R. Gill 

Brian T. Glass 

Lise A. Gloede 



Wendy R. Glover 

Mindy A. Godding 

Elizabeth B. Goodloe 

Talita N. Gray 

Dawn T. Gresham 



Laurie S. Grey 

Amanda G. Grimsley 

Lisa M. Grove 

Melissa D. Grubbs 

Melissa G. Guilliams 



274 



Freshmen 





Regina D. Hall 
Amanda J. Hamilton 
Alicia L. Hamp 
Cynthia A. Hancher 
Jennifer L. Hansen 



Darcey C. Harding 
Kimberly A. Harper 
Sean T. Harrington 
Catherine A. Harris 
Christopher J. Hartary 




Door To Door ServIce 

SfudeK\fs o|+er\ cKose delivery ove^^ D-"hlall 



"Thank you for calling 
Domino's. Can 1 take your or- 
der?" Those words rang familiar 
for the many JMU students who 
ever had a late night of studying, 
a long night of partying or a hur- 
ried night of activities. 

And Domino's wasn't the only 
place called for their pizza; com- 
petition included Papa Jonn's, Mr. 
Gatti's and 4-Star. Four-Star's 
Tuesday "Beat the Clock" deal was 
a favorite of quite a few students. 

Many students often deviated 
from the tried-and-true pizza, or- 
dering subs from 4-Star and JM's 
or Chinese food from Yee's Place. 
Some students collected multiple 



Breeze's just to accumulate more 
coupons for their favorite places. 

In the dorms, ordering out 
came in handy when a walk to D- 
Hall was out of the question be- 
cause of bad weather, time or for 
want of a simple change of food. 
For students off-campus, order- 
ing out was great when there was 
no time or desire to make dinner. 
Or a lunch. Or even a snack. 

Checkbook balances grew 
smaller as the frequency of order- 
ing out grew longer. One student 
felt that she ordered out too much, 
and her favorite restaurant might 
think she was "a pig." So she 
gave a different name every time 



she ordered, just for peace of 
mind. No doubt about it, order- 
ing out got all of the students 
through the best and worst of 
times. 

-Tiffany Gobbi 




Cynthia D. Hartman 
Lisa M. Hass 
Jason C. Hayes 
Sarah T. Headley 
Tina M. Herndon 



John C. Higgins 
Joseph W. Higman 
Kristine S. Hinck 
Yvette M. Holmes 
Brvan K. Holt 



Adam S. Hordell 
Niki Howard 
Brian S. Hughes 
Megan M. Ibach 
Robin C. Jahanian 



Freshmen ^ ( Z) 



HolidAy TRAdiiioNS 



3tudeKvfs yr\c\ 

JMU was a school with many 
holiday traditions. Each year stu- 
dents eagerly anticipated their 
winter break and fun of the holi- 
days. Christmas, Hannukah and 
New Year's all offered students 
the guarantee of a good time. 

Christmas would not be the 
same without the traditional mu- 
sic and activities. Each year hun- 
dreds of people filled Wilson Hall 
for the annual Vespers and the 
Christmas concert. The chorale 
presented a medley of Christmas 
carols accompanied by the brass 
ensemble. 

Huge crowds looked forward 
to the Christmas on the Quad cer- 
emony. Due to the unexpected 
snowfall this year, the tree light- 
ing was held in the Warren Cam- 



SHINING THROUGH. The streets of 
Richmond are lit up for Christmas. 
Going to look at Christmas lights was a 
popular holiday tradition. 



ke fke »r\ost of t^\ei^* 

pus Center. Still, a large number 
of people showed up to share hot 
chocolate, sing carols and witness 
the lighting of the Christmas tree 
by Dr. and Mrs. Carrier while 
WXJM broadcasted live. 

Hillel, the JMU organization 
for Jewish students, sponsored 
events in observance of the eight 
days of Hanukkah. The club gave 
an informative presentation on 
the holiday, complete with speak- 
ers anti the traditional lighting of 
the menorah. Hillel also spon- 
sored an inter-collegiate Hanuk- 
kah dance. Hillel groups from 
universities in Maryland, D.C. and 
Virginia came together to make 
new friends and eat potato latkes 
and other tradional foods. 

And what holiday would be 



complete without parties celebrat- 
ing the season and good friends? 
New Year's Eve was the perfect 
time for either a huge party with 
all of your friends or a quiet 
evening at home with that special 
someone. While some students 
used the night to spend time with 
old high school friends at home, 
others ventured back to 
Harrisonburg to party in their 
own apartments. 

Whether individual or univer- 
sity-wide, such holiday traditions 
helped students survive the stress 
of the final weeks of the semester 
until they could go home for a 
well deserved break! 

-Rebecca Haile and 
Rob Singer 




Af.i^'i.i 




Margaret H. Janca 

Lisa Y. Jenkins 

Dayle G. Johnson 

Ka trice Jones 

Jennifer A. Jonker 



Pamela L. Jung 

Joe Kaminski, Jr. 

Heather R. Kaneer 

Kaarlo K. Kankkunen 

Greg S. Kawakami 



Julie L. Keller 

Rhonda P. Kern 

Michelle A. Kitt 

Kimberly S. Kittrell 

Emily K. Knick 



276 




Freshmen 



I 



O TANNENBAUM. Chorale members 
senior Scott Williamson and sophomore 
Sarah Allen decorate for Christmas 
Vespers. This concert was eagerly 
anticipated by both JMU and the 
Harrisonburg Community. 



IN WITH THE NEW. JMU Sophomore 
Michael Morris gathers with old high 
school buddies to ring in the new year. 
Many students spent New Year's Eve 
night with old and new friends alike. 





Magin 



ALL DECKED OUT. A Harrisonburg 
resident goes all out with holiday 
decorations. Students and those in the 
community alike eagerly anticipated 
Christmas. 

HAPPY HANUKKAH. While not as 
obviously celebrated on campus as 
Christmas, Hanukkah was important 
for Jewish students. 



Mtigin 



Magin 




^wss 








k 1 





Michelle L. Kogle 
Deanna L. Kringel 
Kimberly A. Kupka 
Carrie E. Lahnstein 
Angela Lai 



Miriam T. Lamb 
Jeremy C. Lambert 
Andrew S. Lane 
Sharon A. LaRowe 
Stephen D. Larson 



Todd A. Lasseigne 
Elizabeth A. Lausten 
C. Kil Lee 
Jennifer A. Leet 
Julie B. Lehman 



Freshmen ^ / / 



ForiviaIs 



y\ll df^essed up wi 

Dining, dancing, and dress- 
ing up are a few of the things 
students will remember when 
looking back upon formals and 
semi-formals they attended 
throughout the year. 

These special events held by 
student organizations across 
campus provided students a 
good reason to ask out that fa- 
vorite scope, a chance to do some- 
thing a little more exciting then 
they typical party and a memo- 
rable way to spend time with 
close friends. 

Junior Wendy Miles, a sister 
of Alpha Chi, says formals and 
semi-formals are "events which 
you always look forward to and 
know you will always have a 
good time." Along with social 



+K someplace fo go 
fraternities and sororities, service, 
professional, religious, and ath- 
letic groups across campus held 
such events. 

Washington D.C., Baltimore, 
Charlottesville and Richmond 
were popular locations where 
formals were held. Groups hav- 
ing formals at locations away from 
the Burg looked forward toa road 
trip and partying at a classy hotel. 
Many organizations chose to 
keep their formals with in the 
Harrisonburg area to lower the 
cost and reduce the amount of 
driving. The Sheraton, 

Massanutten resort and Melrose 
Lodge were popular local desti- 
nations where semi-formals and 
formals were held. 

-Beth Ann Howie 




SAY CHEESE. Alisa Gosline, Alicia 
Horton and Susan Clevenger pose 
before leaving for the Delta Sigma Pi 
formal. Their formal was held in the fal' 



Brian Fyock and his date dance the 
night away at the CCM Christmas semi- 
formal. They held formals twice a year 
to allow students to interact socially. 




Adam T. Lewis 

Ashley C. Lewis 

Cynthia A. Liedtke 

Aaron Lineberger 

Andrew T. Little 



Danielle K. Lomax 
Tory Lopes 

Jessica 1. Lovelace 
Taylor H. Loveland 
Katherine A. Lundy 



Xuan D. Luong 

Melissa G. Mangum 

Tracie M. Manning 

Jennifer B. Martin 

Rodman H. Martin 



2 "7 Q Freshmen 




1^ 



Sabin 



SMILE. Formals gave friends an opportu- 
nity to dress up and enjoy an evening out. 
Getting together with good friends made 
formals an event worth waiting for. 

PARTY TIME. Before heading to their 
formal, members of Pi Sigma Epsilon 
get together at a friend's house. Many 
professional fraternities held formals. 



Jennifer S. Martinez 
Lisa Marie Mattingly 
Michael T. Maxwell 
Reo H. Maynard 
Tamara Y. McCaughey 



■^r 



Erin C. McDermott 
Brendan P. McGlynn 
Kathryn M. McGrath 
Dana L. McGraw 
Karen A. McLaughlin 



Tamara J. McLaurin 
Anne M. McMahon 
Arran R. McWhirter 
Shawn E. Miller 
Tiffany D. Miller 



Freshmen ^ ( ^ 



Joanne M. Misiano 

Calista R. Moore 

Anna P. Morford 

Karen M. Morgan 

Sibyl S. Morgan 



Susan E. Morlino 

Lisa M. Morris 

Shelby D. Morris 

Carol A. Morse 

James E. Moye, Jr. 





Magin 
MAKING A SPLASH. Delta Gamma's 
Anchorsplash draws a crowd of Greeks 
and non-Greeks every year. The 
competion between soroities and 
fraternities raised money for their 
philanthrapies. 



«. -> 



ART FOR SALE. Sophomore Anne 
Garrison purchases some posters from 
Trent Grapics representative Karen 
Polopnick. This sale was held in spring 
and in the fall. 




Mtigiii 

FAIR PRICE. John Zimmerman buys 
books from volunteer Drew Moreau at 
the SGA booksale. This sale was an 
annual event to raise money for the 
Student Government. 



mm 



Kalias Muhammad 

Jennifer L. Myers 

Polly J. Nesselrodt 

Ryan L. Netzer 

Amanda E. New 



Soon Hee Newbold 

Angela L. Nichols 

Lisa H.Nobel 

Melissa D. Norwood 

Emily L. O'Daniell 



Kelley L. O'Dell 

Shaun R. O'Neal 

Joseph A. Passerini 

Osric R. Patharkar 

Bryan Patterson 



^ O w Freshmen 





Donnetta R. Payne 
Lori L. Penney 
Janet L. Perrie 
Felicia C. Pickering 
Kerry M. Porter 



Jeremy M. Porter 
Kristen L. Post 
Mike C. Prem 
Kristen L. Ramsey 
Patricia A. Reader 




RAisiNq MoNEy 

S+udervfs wok^k fo Kelp otKers 



Money. Students weren't the 
only ones without it. The organi- 
zations that students belonged to 
required funds in order to accom- 
plish their activities. Fundraisers 
were a fundamental part of the 
cash flow for groups. The most 
important part of raising money 
was inventing new and innova- 
tive ways to make the most money 
in the shortest time. 

Vendors on the WCC patio 
were one of the most common 
methods used by organizations 
to raise money. Local merchants 
utilized the opportunity to sell 
their goods to students. Merchan- 
dise included such items as sweat- 
ers, jewelry, t-shirts and 



sweatshirts. More unusual prod- 
ucts, hammocks and incense, 
could also be purchased on the 
patio. "1 like to just browse through 
the merchandise on the patio in 
case something catches my atten- 
tion," said Cara Feys. 

A variety of other fundraisers 
have become annual events. Delta 
Gamma sorority held its annual 
Anchorsplash, a week-long com- 
petition between the greek orga- 
nizations. Alpha Chi Omega 
sponsored frisbee fling, a field 
event where fraternities compete 
in frisbee games. Auctions and 
raffles were other popular 
fundraisers. The student ambas- 
sadors held a silent auction by 



selling items that had been do- 
nated by individuals and local 
businesses. Erika Freihage, presi- 
dent of Student Ambassadors, 
explained, "The auction is a good 
fundraiser because it involves 
both students and the commu- 
nity." 

While students weren't known 
for having a large expendible in- 
come, they were a large source of 
business for local merchants. If 
the product met the needs or de- 
sires of the students, then they 
could usually find enough change 
in their pockets or checks in their 
checkbooks to support the orga- 
nizations on campus. 

-Kate Travers 




Tracy A. Reichardt 
Andrea Remy 
Dena R. Reynolds 
Amy D. Ritchie 
Steven M. Ritchie 



Melinda R. Roish 
Kristen E. Ross 
Richard P. Rowland 
Karen L. Schilken 
Alison R. Schoemann 



Mary E. Schutta 
Whitney H. Sherman 
Amber i.Shiftlett 
Dana L. Shurr 
James B. Signorelli 



Freshmen 



281 



Tiffany D. Simmons 

Kelly M. Sims 

Jennifer M. Sincarage 

Sheri D. Spence 

Theresa L. Sperberg 

Mike L. Stillwell 

Melanie A. Stone 

Melissa A. Stone 

Meredith D. Storck 

Adrienne F. Straub 

Leigh A. Sullivan 

Kristen E. Swartout 

Jennifer L. Swartz 

Doug W. Sweeney, Jr. 

Kay A. Swennes 

Rebecca A. Sysko 

Christina G. Thai 

Carolyn E. Thierbach 

Rikki R. Thomas 

Megan E. Tillery 

James M. Tongue 

Renee V. Toy 

Patricia A. Tuberty 

Wanda D. Tyler 

Kimberly S. VanHorn 

Jon D. VanHyning 

Trang T. Vu 

Scott D. Walker 

Christopher D. Weaver 

H. Elizabeth Weeks 

Chris R. Weins 

Olivia Weisbard 

Mary S. Weiss 

Lisa A. Welsh 

Lellyett E. Wentworth 

Renee A. Wheelbarger 

Kristy L. Wheeler 

Tara E. Wiedeman 

Jessica L. Wilk 

Libby Wilson 

Michelle M. Winder 

Eric H. Withrow 

Theresa D. Woodard 

Alice H. Wong 

Wynne W. Wong 

Karen A. Wu 

Amy L. Wright 

Robert W. Wright, III 





^ilM 



M. Susan Wright 

Lisa M. Wright 

Kristine E. Wulf 

Liane C. Wunder 

Ryan M. Zimmerman 




2.82. Freshmen 



I 



UncIe Ron" 




Dr. Ronald Carrier's 
hard work and determina- 
tion has helped to place 
James Madison University 
as one of the most popular, 
top ranked colleges in the 
nation. Dr. Carrier has 
worked for 22 years towards 
the goal of making JMU 
"the finest undergraduate 
liberal arts institution in the 
country." Despite contin- 
ued cuts made in Virginia's 
budget for higher education, 
Carrier's skills as a leader 
and a politician have helped 
the university to improve. 

The College of Integrated 
Science and Technology, a 
project which has held much 
of Dr. Carrier's interest in 
the past, continued to de- 
velop under his watchful 
eye. The new college began 
classes for the first time this 
year. While still in its early 
stages, this division of James 
Madison University prom- 



ises to be a valuable asset to 
the college community. 

This year also brought 
about the construction of 
several new campus build- 
ings. A new dorm and an 
addition to the Warren Cam- 
pus Center were only two of 
the university expansions 
under Dr. Carrier's care. 

In addition to the expan- 
sion of the university. Dr. 
Carrier was also concerned 
with the needs of the stu- 
dents. He could frequently 
be seen on the quad or hav- 
ing lunch in one of the vari- 
ous dining facilities in order 
to maintain a close relation- 
ship with students. 

Dr. Carrier's genuine con- 
cern for JMU students and 
his dedication to excellence 
has brought about many 
positive changes for the uni- 
versity and the student 
body. 



Magin 



Administration 2 O 3 



AdMiNiSTRATJON 



Dr. Jack M. Armistead 

-Dean of the College of 

Letters and Sciences 

Dr. A. Jerry Benson 

-Dean of the College of 

Education and Psychology 

Dr. Robert E. Holmes 

-Dean of the College of 

Business 



Dr. Julius B. Roberson 

-Dean of the College of 

Health and Human 

Services 

Dr. Richard F. 

Whitman 

-Dean of the College of 

Fine Arts and 

Communication 

Dr. Lyle C. Wilcox 

-Provost of the College of 

Integrated Science and 

Technology 



2.Q^ Administration 




n 




Dr. Mark Warner 
-Executive Assistant 
to the President 



Dr. Bethany Oberst 

-Vice President of 
Academic Affairs 

Mr. Larry Holsinger 
-Director of Audit 
and Management 
Review 

Mr. John Knight 
-Manager of Audit 
and Mangement 
Review 



Dr. Barbra Castello 
-Vice President of 
Sponsored Research 
and External Programs 

Mr. Donald Lemish 
-Vice President of 
University Advancement 

Dr. Linvv^ood Rose 

-Vice President of 
Student Affairs 



Administration i2.0Z^ 



! 




CLUBS, 

STUPCA)TS 

TAKC 



i 





CHILLIN'. Representatives of campus organizations 
participate in Student Activities Night, STAN, on the 
patio bv the Warren Campus Center. STAN gave 
clubs the chance to recruit ne\v members. 

BACK TO NATURE. Jen Horan, Steve Taylor and 
other members of CCM venture on a camping trip. 
Getting awav from campus gave group members the 
chance to get to know one another. 



CLUBS SVOTOK 



Ma^in 



2-8 S ^^^^^ Divider 



GROUP 




JMU students participated in the 
many clubs present on campus. From 
sports to academic to religious, there 
was a club to suit most everyone's inter- 
ests. 

The various clubs and organizations 
offered friendship, common bonds, and 
chances for leadership. Students could 
get together to engage in activities, have 
serious discussions, work on projects, 
or just hang out. 

Through their efforts, club members 
spread theJMU name in the community 
through competition andservice work. 
Internally, the groups heightened cam- 
pus awareness of issues important to 
the student body. 

The organizations linked common 
interests and brought out the strengths 
of students. As a collective group, the 
clubs of JMU made their own impact. 



Magin 



EFFORT 



Clubs Divider 



287 



Campus Leaders 



SGA and UCO act as the 
voice of the student body 



The SGA was the student legislative 
body at JMU. Technically, the SGA in- 
cluded every undergraduate member of the 
JMU student body. However, most of the 
work was done by a group of elected 
individuals chosen to represent everyone. 
Each residence hall chose senators, as did 
the Communter Student Council. 

The SGA was primarily responsible for 
passing campus legislation and allocating 
funds to different student organizations. 
For example, UPB, WXJM, and the Blue- 
stone would not have been possible if the 
SGA had not provided them with money to 
cover their expenses. 

The SGA was also successful in making a 
major change in student meal plans. Each 
student who purchased a meal plan was 
given two additional meal tickets for guests. 

The SGA elections for executive positions 
were taken very seriously by the campus 
and the candidates. Candidate platforms 
included everything from installing 
condom machines to improving the parking 
conditions for commuters. This year 
brought a larger voter turnout than in years 
past. Due to close numbers there was even 
a runoff election. 

The SGA exists to serve the student 



SGA 



body and act as a liaison to the administra- 
tion. They aim to make campus life better 
and more diverse. 

The University Class Organization is 
another group of elected individuals that 
exists to serve the students of JMU. The 
UCO is composed of four class councils, 
freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors, 
that oversee the respective activities of their 
class. 

Officers are elected by their peers for the 
roles of Presedent , Vice President, Trea- 
surer and Secretary. Each class only votes 
for the officers for their council. 

UCO has been responsible for organizing 
the Freshmen Watermelon Social, the '93 
Days to Graduation Party, the Senior Pig 
Roast, Retired Faculty Member Banquets 
and the Mr. and Ms. Madison Outstanding 
Student Award. 

These annual activities provide students 
with events that help each class get ac- 
quainted and maintain a close bond 
throughout their four years of college. 

UCO strives for unity within each class 
through the array of social and service 
events that it sponsors. At the same time, 
the UCO provides good times and good 
friends. 




288 




Row 1; Lori Firestone, Stephanie Tragakis, Natanya Barrow, Heather Tierney, Allan 
Grimsley, Mary Katharine Wall, Rhonda Wilson, Andrea Talbot, Pek Quann Soon Row 2:] 
Laura Hilbert, Roy Firestone, Kimberly Copeland, Lauri Grooms, Michael Booker, Alan 
Harria, Mike Kelley, Alexis McCombs, Mimi Al-Hassan Row 3: Franklin Dam, Matthew 
Kossman, Jason Bazar, Eric Withrow, Tim Cooke, Randy Dunn, James Scott, Jason Adkins 
Jeffrey Gilliatt, Jeffrey Lucy 




President Ronald Carrier and Mrs. Carrier help 
celebrate the crowning of Mr. and Ms. Madison during 
halftime on Parents weekend. UCO sponsored the Mr. 
ft and Ms. Madison contest. 



SGA Officers: Nelly Nguyen,Legislative VP, Mark 
Wunder, Treasurer, Danny Cruce, President and Scott 
Surovell, Administrative VP pose for a picture. Their 
job was to organize and lead the SGA as a whole. 





UCO 



Row 1 : Steve Wilcox, Karen Jones Row 2: Scott Burnop, Christie Lovelace, Julia Tock, 
Sarah Herrick, Lisa Cox Row 3: Alison Winter, Gavrielle Josel, Rayne Dennis Row 4: 
Para Wood, Jamey Doran, Grace Kobi, Traci Bowles 



289 



The Honor Council takes time out of their busy 
schedule to enjoy time together on a retreat. Many 
clubs went on weekend get aways for training and 
gettiung to know each other better. 




Honor 
Council 



Row 1: Dan Stanton, Mike Coffee, Brian Belforte Row 2: Cynthia Pendleton, Leslie Godby, 
Jennifer Rota Row 3: Tori Reinhold, Lisa Knispel, Daniel Colitti, Michael Volley, Francie 
Makris, Rob Scharpf, Dana Martin, Jennifer Myers, Kenda Goldberg Row 4: Todd Mercer, 
Suzanne Schulte, Heidi Knapp, Ashley Warren, Alex Benedict, Jason Bazar, Christopher 
Ernst, Michael Siewers, Chris Just, Charles Jones, Kathy Caterson, Maggie Cronin 



290 




m^ So Committed 



Honor Council upholds a 

policy of honesty 

Ambassadors act as 

JMU representatives 



The JMU Honor Council was a 
student run organization which enforced 
the provisions of the JMU Honor Code. In 
a university community, there was no 
doubt that honor and the pursuit of knowl- 
edge were inexorably intertwined. True 
knowledge could only be gained through 
honorable means. 

The Honor Council consisted of an 
elected president and vice president, four 
appointed investigators, and about 40 
student representatives, the Honor Council 
was responsible for investigating and 
trying all Honor Code violations. The 
council heard each case and then voted on 
the innocence or guilt of the individual 
being tried. The purpose of the Honor 
Council was not only to encourage students 




Row 1: AH Kutner, Deb Katz, Jamie Baskerville, Erika Freihage, Kristy Orringer, Dawn Landes, Kelly 
Tomlin Row 2: Yolanda Stewart, Kelly Friday, Tamara Goorevitz, Regan Hall, Julie Laske, Karen 
Gelfond, Kim Baker, Jean Maddrea, Jodi Carney, Cindy Payne, Shannon Dolan, Katrine Weiss, 
Cheryl Jackson, Veleka Studivant, Jennifer Lovelidge, Nicole Chafitz, Lisa Bishop Row 3: Rick Kern, 
Mike Sarner, Christie Frey, Donna Ragsdale, Corey Herd, Jennifer Reed, Adam Klein, Jenny Howard, 
Amanda Davis, Lisa Crabbs, Julie Bragg, Mary Stuart Boling, Michael Beebe, Christie Clarke, Eric 
Davis Row 4: David Lloyd, Neil Sherman, Kristen Heiser, Laura Hulsey, Jonathan Bernsyein, 
Michael Siewers, Sam Zizzi, Maura Shyne, Melisa Smith, Amy Jeffries, Jen Anthony, Uman Bakshi, 
Kerry Pence, Erica Hawley, Bill Wells, Meredith Adams, Alison Hillow, Susan Brinkworth, David 
Bradley, Candy White, Jason Budd Row 5: Randy Dunn, Chad Barbour, Michael Pickles, Zach Elliot, 
Chris Self, Chris Lawing 



to take pride in the high standard of ethics 
that has become a tradition at JMU. 

The Student Ambassadors pro- 
vided many invaluable services to JMU. 
One of their many tasks is given informa- 
tive and friendly campus tours to prospec- 
tive students and their parents. The student 
ambassadors also helped the admissions 
staff to arrange events such as class re- 
unions. Parent's Weekend, and Homecom- 
ing. This organization helped to promote 
an atmosphere of learning along with fun. 
the members were eager, outgoing and 
ready to get involved. They stood out as 
leaders on campus and created stronger 
relations between students and administra- 
tion as well as entertainment and student 
life. 



Student 
Ambassadors 



291 



Work and Play 



UPB provides campus fun 

while honoraries reward 

academic 

excellence 



The University Program Board catered to 
the university's need for diversions. Along 
with sponsoring this year's spring break 
trip to Jamaica, the UPB also brought 
comedian Rita Rudner and musical per- 
formers The Ocean Blue to campus. 

Day to day activities also fall within the 
realm of UPB responsibiUties. The movies 
that are played at Grafton-Stovall Theater, 
the bands that grace the Commons during 
lunch, and various educational speakers 
have all appeared at the request of the UPB. 

Psi Chi is the honor society for psychol- 
ogy majors and minors. Members are 
initiated annually based on their acadmic 
achievement and their contributions to the 
fiel dof psychology. 



Psi Chi also recognizes non-students who 
contribute to psychological research. Psi 
Chi strives for professionalism and accuracy 
in its field's research. 

Beta Alpha Psi is a national honorary for 
students of accounting. The organization 
focuses on helping its members expand 
their career abilities. Different speakers and 
presentations let students add practical job- 
oriented knowledge to the classroom 
learning experience. 

Beta Alpha Psi also particpates in a 
number of community service projects, 
including tax assistance to the public. 

Beta Alpha Psi is present on over a 
hundred different college campuses, and 
has existed since 1919. 




V 




As a job perk, University Program Board members get 
to attend the events they sponsor for free. Often there 
is a catch to free, UPB members often work as security, 
ushers, or in ticket sales for large university sponsored 
events. 



New inductees into Psi Chi sign the register as they 
become members of the psychology honor society. Psi 
Chi added a pledge period to the membership 
requirements in order to stimulate involvement. 

Men's Basketball Coach Lefty Driesell announces the 
opening for musical performers Ocean Blue. Well 
known campus personalities acted as emcees and 
announcers for different University Program Board 
events. 



292 





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UPB 



Row 1: Brian Correia, Wendy Stephens, Serena Ricci, Jen Shaffer Row 2: Jeff Skahnski, TJ 
Speiss, Nicole Ardoin, Kevin Kasten, Janel Schuh, David Thomas 




Psi Chi 



Row 1: Anne McCarthy, Elizabeth Robinson, Bonnie Rosenblatt Row 2: Julia 


lock, Hannah 


Hinely, Viveca Sheppard, Deanne 


Heyer Row 3: Srah Baker, Kelly Johnson, 


Eric Davis, 


Corrinne Gregory, Julie McEntee 








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Beta Alpha Psi 



Row 1 : Alison Maney, Jenn Downing, Elaine Chapman, Jen Rowen Row 2: Joseph 
Draetta, Kevin Radcliffe, Darren Hurlburt, Greg Mitchell, Allen Chin Row 3:James 
Nicoletto, Stefan Huh, Doug Glickman, William Roach, Drew Conrad, David Kerr, Brad 
Karlan O O Q 



Achieving Goals 



Honor Societies and 

Academic Clubs add to 

the academic 

experience 



Mortar Board, Inc. is a national 
honor society of college seniors recognized 
for their superior scholarship, outstanding 
and continual leadership, and dedicated 
service to the university and community. 
New members join a network that included 
approximately 200 chapters nationwide. 
Each member is challenged to provide 
thoughtful leadership to the campus and 
community, to create an environment of 
effective communication, to move toward a 
meaningful goal and to maintain the ideals 
of the society. 

Eta Sigma Gamma is the national 
professional honorary society in health 
sciences education. The organization's 
principal purpose is to elevate the stan- 
dards, ideals, competence, and ethics of 
professionally trained men and women in 
the discipline of health science. ESG 
annually sponsors Health Week on campus 
to encourage optimal health and assists 
with the Valley AIDS Network. 

Mortarboard 

Anne McCarthy, Stephanie Bekhor, Becki 
Shuford Row 2: Hallie Moreland, Jennifer 
Erdman, Alison Swenton Row 3: Amy 
Taylor, Rachelle Brown, Ken Buraker, 
Tammy Rinehart Row 4: Wendy Garpow, 
Donna Parr, Dave HoUoway, Travis Farris, 
Patricia Delk 



Eta Sigma Gamma 

Row 1: Anna Larson, Jacque Farmer, Allison 
Mumper, Krista Christy, Jackie Moleno Row 2: 
Shelly McMinn, Michelle Brisson, Jennifer Smith, 
Michele Krause, Kristen Ryan, Becky Freed, 
Diane Nies Row 3: Jennifer English, Kristine 
Johnson, Stacey Falls, Anne Hammond-Tooke, 
Shannon Boal, Nina Musacchio, Rene Hagy, 
Mary Lynch, Donna Reid, Kim Weitzenhofer 
Row 4: Corbitt Wright, Vicki Sims, Ruth Moran, 
Aimee Lockman, Serena Ricci, Jennifer Harvey, 
Maureen Lacy, Nancy Gross, Karen Hoke, Robin 
Wells Row 5: Juvonia Earle, Todd Mercer, Trina 
Arvold, Elliot Jenkins, Tricia Keegan, Josh 
Fedalen, Michelle Gurile, Zoe Arastas, Ingrid 
Batra, Brady Slater, Leigh Ann Woods, Michelle 
Howard 



Mu Kappa Tau is JMU's Marketing 
Honor Society. They extend invitations to 
marketing majors who have excellent 
academic records and are also recognized 
leaders in the community. Mu Kappa Tau 
sponsored trips to businesses such as the 
Martin Agency and IBM in order to give 
students the chance to see practical applica- 
tions of their studies. The spring banquet 
was an important social event to initiate 
new members. Members of Mu Kappa Tau 
are proud to participate in JMU's only 
marketing honor society. 

Another organization supported by 
the marketing department was the Madison 
Marketing Association. This group spon- 
sored events that assisted marketing majors 
with applying their academic pursuits to 
current business practices. By sponsoring 
talks on the role marketing and marketers 
have on the business world, MMA pro- 
vided students with the experience neces- 
sary to succeed in their future jobs. 





JMU Student S tacy Presnick welcomes alumni Rick 
Golden back to JMU. Memebrs of the Madison 
Marketing Association enjoyed social activitiers 
togetlier, like this casual tailgate party held on 
Homecoming weekend. 



Eta Sigma Gamma members gather around the tree 
during their annual Christmas party. When the 
members weren't busy promoting health awareness 
and sponsoring health programs, they found time to 
socialize with one another. 




Madison Marketing Association 

Row 1: Jason Wilk, Sarah Wampler, Jean 
Maddrea, Julie Wooddell, Michael Siewers 
Row 2: Annalisa Wilkinson, Audrey Butts, 
Mary-Kay Trible, Lisa Cordiano Row 3: 
Karen Baker, Lynn Prudin, Arnold 
Thornhill, Eric Strauss, Jeffrey Schum 



Career Clubs 



Business Clubs let 

their members learn 

out of 

the classroom 



As the largest college, the College 
of Business supported numerous groups. 
Alpha Kappa Psi was one of the many 
business fraternities, and the newest. Alpha 
Kappa Psi has grown since its induction in 
1991. The fraternity sponsors business 
speakers and professional events. Service 
events were also a large part of their 
agenda, as members participated in car 
washes, basketball coaching and bake sales. 
Gaining professional skills was only one 
part of membership, friendship and broth- 
erhood were the foundation of the frater- 
nity. 

Phi Beta Lambda was a business 
club that prided itself on involving people 
from majors throughout the university. This 
separated it from most other business 
organizations. PBL provided students with 
a broader view of the corporate world by 
working on events including Free Enter- 
prise week, a week-long lineup of business 
speakers and workshops. They also spon- 
sored a trip to New York to visit the Stock 



Alpha Kappa Psi 

Row 1 : Barry Eimer, Stacy Presnick, Sheryl 
Vezina, Kim Brown, Jean Maddrea, Kelly 
Friday, Julie Wooddell, Megan Gallagher, 
Gwen Carpenter, Gabe Trasatti, Anna- 
Marie Slot, Susan Palocsay Row 2: Doug 
Preston, Cheryl Windham, Carolyn Powers, 
Mary Catherine Mavor, Lisa Wehrli, Lara 
McConnell, Todd Jones, Mitch Buckner, 
Patrick McQuillan, Tina Wade, Shaudy 
Moayery, John Avery, Karen Baker Row 3: 
Tamaika Menefee, Heather Kuhl, Christo- 
pher Loker,Jeffrey Kane, Scott Rovers, 
Dennis Vicchio, Alex Waddell, Chris Susil, 
Dennis Burke, Bill Zarotny, Matk Aukamp, 
Barry Danoff, Lynn Pruden, Brian Watts 

FMA 

Row 1: Rudolf Boquiron, Edwin Szeto, 
Ketan Parekh Row 2:Brian Senatore, David 
Meredith, Bill Mistele, Timothy Sturr, 
Ashley Warren 



Exchange and other large businesses. 

FMA is the student chapter of the 
National Financial Management Associa- 
tion for business professionals. The club is 
open to all majors, but is comprised mostly 
of finance and accounting students. FMA 
brought several speakers to talk about 
current topics, job opportunities, inter- 
views and the world of finance in general. 
Other events included a trip to New York, 
fundraisers, a community service project 
and a business contacts program. 

Focusing on more creative aspects 
of business is the JMU chapter of the 
Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs, 
which exists to help students understand 
new ventures, small business management 
and free enterprise. ACE serves as a 
network and support group for student 
entrepreneurs who want to pursue inde- 
pendent business enterprises or create new 
products or services. ACE's most visible 
project was the Men of Madison calendar 
featuring some of JMU's male students. 




296 





Members of Alpha Kappa Psi relax on the sidelines after 
winning a tough Softball game. The athletic members of 
this coed business organization formed an intramural 
team and took away the first place award in their cat- 
egory 



Corey was one of the men who posed for ACE's Men of 
Madison Calendar. ACE used the calendar a fundraiser 
and an entrepreneurial idea. 





1993 Men of Madison Calendar 

Phi Beta Lambda 

Row 1 : Sonya Harris, Theresa Prebish, 
Robyn Bands Row 2: Altrina Fleming, Terri 
Dimino, Kristin Johnson, Katharine Kramer 
Row 3: Jerry McCormick, FrankHn Dam, 
Scott Margaret, Shelley Hanger 




^ — > 



w. 




,.<#^\ 




ACE 

^ Row 1: Anthony Main, Kent Bakke Row 2: 
Jordan Hague, Mark Schneider 



'\ 



297 



Delta Sigma Pi brothers Alicia Horton, Andrea Robinson 
and Susan Clevenger take an elevator ride back to their 
rooms in the Hyatt Regency in Richmond. The frater- 
nity had a full weekend of initiation activities in Rich- 
mond. 



Members of Pi Sigma Epsilon and their dates enjoy their 
fall semi-formal. PSE brothers looked foreward to this 
event as well as their annual formal held in the spring. 

Pi Sigma Epsilon brothers Eric Longo and Ward Ponn 
spend time together during a Halloween party. Through 
all of the PSE activities, a strong brotherhood developed 
within the fraternitv. 




Pi Sigma 
Epsilon 



298 



Rowl: Michael Chu, Joe Matthews, Alice Su, Lee Ray, Todd Boss, Tisha Hunt, Angela Firkins, Lori 
Brewer, Mary Kay Tribble. Row 2: Christine Chang, Chrissie Smith, Alison Swenton, Karen 
Gelfond, Erica Lewis, Rachel Phillips, Kirsta Rauch, Lynn Grammer, Stacy Philippi, Neda Irannejad. 
Row 3: Suzanne Smith, Lisa Duffy, Jody Melvin, Ronnie Shields, Jeremy Schwarz, Eric Jones, Susan 
Towe, Eric Longo, Michael Arney, Frank Sparacino, Robert Delmarco, Kevin Woo, Amy Branch, 
Cheyrl Burnett, Kathy Cardile, Denise Long. Row 4: Anne Marie DeRose, Steve Mengel, Travis 
Anderson, Heather Gustin, J. P. Connelly, Geoff Alexander, Matt Extrom, John McHugh, Ward 
Ponn. Row 5: Paul Moye, Bill Fettig, Russ Tickle, Susan Guise, Julie Contos, Brian Correia, Chris 
Simpson. 



Brotherhood 



Delta Sigma Pi and Pi Sigma 

Epsilon Mix 

Business with 

Pleasure 




^1^ 



J' 



Pi Sigma Epsilon, a business 
fraternity for marketing, sales and sales 
management grew in members and activi- 
ties during the 92-93 school year. The 
fraternity, over 41 years old nationally, was 
in its fourth year at JMU. 

Pi Sigma Epsilon offered its mem- 
bers a great number of professional oppor- 
tunities. Each semester, prospective PSE 
members were required to complete a long 
term marketing project to teach them the 
requirements and ethics involved in the 
marketing profession. Although the focus 
of the fraternity was on the field of market- 
ing, membership was open to students of all 
majors. All PSE brothers participated in 
marketing and fund-raising projects, as well 
as community service activities, such as the 
Celebrity Serve banquet at Spotswood 
Country Club and hours serving meals at 
local soup kitchens. 

In addition to its professional 
benefits, the Pi Sigma Epsilon members also 
enjoyed a strong brotherhood throughout 
the fraternity. Each new member was 
matched with a big brother to help him/her 
become more comfortable with the frater- 
nity. Brothers also socialized during 
formals, semi-formals and theme parties, 




Row 1: Scott Mursten, Greg Mitchell, Tammy Mackert, Mary Gibrall, Sibyl Biller, Diane 
Beury, Sam Lloyd Row 2; Nicolette Schmitt, Traci Showalter, Natalie Guenther, Alisa 
" Gosline, Rachel Mintz, Cathy Withrow, Shawnda Wilson Row 3: Steve Nguyen, Laura 
Barney, Gwen Weaver, Wanda Cauthorne, Jinhee Kim, Mikael Monoukian, Sue Clevenger, 
Laurie Smith, Kathy Caterson, Stacy Spivey, Chelsea Traylor, Tom Manning Row 4: Shari 
Bruton, Michael Spencer, Donal Conners, James Wilson, Robert Stiles, Timothy Salamy, 
Justin Miller, Lori Lenskold, Bill Freed, Paton Robinson, Sherry Carlton, Jason Curley 



and could often be seen spending time 
together in Zane Showker Hall. 

Delta Sigma Pi's Iota Kappa chapter 
was also very active at JMU. The business 
fraternity prided itself on being a very 
close-knit group who together worked to 
promote ethics and high standards of 
business professionalism. Delta Sig often 
sponsored guest speakers that any inter- 
ested student could attend. 

Like the other JMU business 
fraternities. Delta Sigma Pi got its new 
members through rush each semester. 
After the new members got their bids, they 
went through a busy semester of attending 
professional activities, learning fraternity 
history and getting to know each other. 

The brothers of Delta Sigma Pi felt 
that it was important to be well-rounded 
and participate in a variety of activities. 
Along with their professional activities, the 
Delta Sig brothers also took part in commu- 
nity service projects, such as Adopt-A- 
Highway. Also, for a creative fund-raiser, 
the brothers took part in a see-saw-a-thon. 
For this activity, the Delta Sig members see- 
sawed outside of Zane Showker hall. 



Delta Sigma Pi 



299 



Coitimunicators 



AERho, and lABC focus on 

different aspects of 

comnnunicating 



Once again. Alpha Epsilon Rho, an 
honorary national broadcasting fraternity, 
gave Human and Mass Communication 
majors the opportunity to expand their 
knowledge in their respective fields. Mem- 
bers of AERho were able to gain practical 
information useful in the work place from 
experts in the business. Professionals from 
local as well as nationally recognized 
television and radio stations appeared as 
guest speakers at the bi-weekly meetings. 
Such speakers kept students up to date on 
current trends and practices in the commu- 
nication world. 

In addition to the valuable experi- 
ence of interacting with professionals and 
other students, members of AERho gained 
added hands-on experience in the annual 
take-over of radio station Q-101. For one 
day, students filled all the positions and 
took on all the responsibilities necessary to 
make the local station run successfully. 

JMU's chapter of AERho strived to 
establish both excellence and integrity in its 
members. In being recognized by this 
honorary fraternity, students realized their 
responsibilities to the public. As communi- 
cators, thev had access to the great strength 
of the media, and were dedicated to ensur- 
ing the use of this influence for the good of 
its audience. 

The International Association of 
Business Communicators was yet another 
group at JMU concerned with the profes- 



Members of LABC lure potential new members at 
student activities night. lABC takes part in many 
different activities like professional guest speakers, 
fundraisers, and regular meetings. The lABC was 
geared towards communications students. 



300 




sional advancement and the possible future 
careers of its members. An international 
organization with chapters in over 40 
countries, lABC was dedicated to promot- 
ing excellence in communications. Under 
the leadership of Dr. Mae Frantz, JMU's 
chapter of lABC was one of the strongest 
among the organization's 50 collegiate 
chapters. Sponsored by the Human 
Communication department, lABC gave its 
members the opportunity to gain valuable 
interaction with professionals and hands- 
on experience in various communication 
fields such as public relations or have the 
unique chance to participate in an 
externship. Exclusive to lABC, externships 
allowed members the opportunity to 
shadow a professional in a particular field 
for one day. 

Members of lABC can take pride in 
being a part of an internationally recog- 
nized organization while gaining the 
practical experience necessary to ensure 
their successful professional development. 



Members of lABC gather around the refreshments dur- 
ing their annual Christmas party. Events such as this 
provided a break from the work of classes and the normal 
business meetings of the group. 




AERho 



Row 1: Tracy Wong, Stephanie Popham, Allison Satre Row 2: Michele Benson,Damia 
Dunn, Lynne Dohner, Stephanie Day, Hallie Moreland Row 3: Julie Bragg, Julie Monrad, 
Scott Johnson, Beth Pugh, Carrie Scattergood Row $:Anna Selden, Laura Nesbitt, Matt 
Diezel, Sara Hammel, Rachelle Brown 




Row 1: Mae Frantz, Jaye Singer, Joseph Yates, Tracy Bolander, Kevin Drummond, Monica Windley, Tara Falwell, 
Molly Prickett, Latia Green, Brad Rawlins Row 2: Kim Stratton, Kim Baker, Maritess Gonzales, Amy Taylor, 
Paulene Pakidis, Ashley Glazebrook, Diana Fischetti, Cindy Williams, Kay Gilliam, Darcy Bailey, Richard 
Kern,Tracey Rice, Christina Rebich Row 3; Erica Reid, Candy White, Jennifer Sims, Tina Fox, Mike BoUar, Kirsten 
Haack, Nicole Wise, Tina Passmore, Michelle Berte, Rhonda Wilson, Alice Riddick, Jenny Howard, Sarah Gatley 
Row 4: Tia Brown, David Meredith, Susan Lyles, Becky Wood, Rebecca Andrews, Susan Cook, Brian Belforte, 
Sandra Maddox, Andrea Brown, Mitchelie Alston, Sandra Shrum, Nora McDermott, Corey Smith 



301 



Row 1: Lisa Melroy, Andrea Johnson, Teresa Cash, Andi Meredith Row 2: Holly CollinsJ 
Wendi Carter, Lisa Barsnica, Renae Mitchell Row 3: Tonya Henley, Erica Bates, Donna Parr.j 
Belinda Chilson 



Members of Circle K gather at the District Convention Andy Meredith gives a clinical tour during parent's 

held in Charlottesville. The Circle K clubs are nationally weekend. The NSSLHA offered help to students in the 

represented at colleges and are recognized for their hearing, language and speech fields. Parents often 

achievements and dedication to service and contribution took a special interest in their childrens prospective 

to the community. careers. 




Row 1 : Amy Bugenhagen, Jeffrey Cohn, Patricia Delk, Christie Frey Row 2: Dennis Pet, 
Sean Harrington Row 3: Chris Morrow, Mike Markisello, Heidi Arthur, Jeffrey Gilliatt, 
Emily Olesch, Terri Dimino, Richard Vogel 








Circle K 




Say Service 



NSSLHA learns about 

language and hearing 

Circle K serves the 

public 



The National Student Speech 
Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA) 
provided prospective teachers and educa- 
tors at JMU with the valuable opportunity 
to get insight into what a career in their 
field would be like. Undergraduate and 
graduate students majoring in Speech 
Pathology and Audiology were eligible for 
membership in the organization. Whether 
preparing for a future in graduate school or 
a career in the field of communication 
disorders, guest speakers gave students an 
idea of what could be expected in the 
future. NSSLHA events were also character- 
ized by social events, fundraisers, and 
service work which all helped to facilitate 
interaction among faculty, students and the 
community. Students learned that there 
was no better way to gain first hand knowl- 
edge perspectives in their field than 
through the actual experiences they had in 
their involvement with NSSLHA. 



Involvement, service, action. The 
JMU chapter of Circle K International 
catively promoted these ideals. A unique 
organization on campus. Circle K encom- 
passed a wide range of individuals, each 
ultimately dedicated to serving the commu- 
nity. Members actively initiated and 
sponsored community projects, whose aim 
was to strengthen and reinforce the impact 
of the individual. 

Circle K allowed the opportunity 
for members to develop leadership skills, 
provide service to the campus and commu- 
nity, as well as developing friendships. 
Circle K enhanced a student's education 
beyond the classroom. Education primarily 
came from being of service to others and 
from the social brotherhood Circle K 
offered. Parties, conventions, road trips 
and dinners were just a few aspects which 
made Circle K a "total organization." 



303 



The members of Alpha Phi Omega take a break from 
their work to stop in a clearing on the Hone Quary 
trail. As part of an Adopt-a-Trail program, APO 
maintained the trail while keeping the natural habitat 
for both humans and animals to enjoy. 




Alpha Phi 
Omega 



304 



Row 1: Sarah Jenkinson, Marilyn Ramos, Suzanne Paxton, Mathhew Moore, Elaine Shoka, Tanya Miller, Mike 
Ogilvie, Debra Flechner, Valerie Walsh, Eve Winter, Allison Williams Row 2: Michelle Williams, Shell Burch, 
Stacy Flechner, Ali Kutner, Melody Hubbard, Karen Roeis, Lisa Barsnica, Amy Gartrell, Jennifer Horsley, 
Christina Smith, Christy Smith, Erin Walsh, Elbert Espanol Row 3: JH Watts, Maritess Gonzales, Dennis Pet, 
Jennifer Bulge, Michele Dunbar, Lori Maryscuk, Lisa Bennett, Leesa Sawyer, Sheri Yoho, Jennifer Lofquist, 
Maggie Mayall, Logan Ellington, Christine DiTrani, Susan Firth Row 4 Michael Hughes, Katherine Archer, Beth 
Greczek, Sarah Mooney, Sarah Gatley, Rachel Gustafson, Monica Sharper, Scott Secrest, Deana Hoisington, NornT' 
Gonzales, Sheri Watts, Shelley Oliver, Emily Peake, Tina Lee, Kathy Hughes, Dana Gooch Row 5: Todd Foster, 
Don Zamini, Michael Dixon, Daniel Pepin, Tim Craig, Chip Ferguson, Gary Vaughan, Brent Peterson, Bobby 
Goller, Spam, Stephen Goewey, Allison Harris, Brian Quick, James Song, John Geddie, Chris Craig, Blake Reid 

i 



imtl 
Bess, 




Serving Others 



Alpha Phi Omega gives 

its time to serve others 

BSU finds satisfaction in 

serving God 



The groups stands hand in hand in 
a circle around the big room. The picture of 
fellowship, faith and friendship — the 
members of the Baptist Student Union share 
many things through this organization. 

The BSU star symbolizes the 
purpose and mission of the organization — 
reaching in for fellowship and spiritual 
growth, and reaching out to help others and 
share the good news of their Christian faith. 
College is often a time for exploration of 
beUef and faith. Learning more about the 
love of a God so great that he knows the 
number of hairs upon our head is the 
purpose of the BSU. And the BSU offers a 
variety of ministries to promote both 
reaching in and reaching out. 

The BSU sponsors a drama group, a 
liturgical dance team, a choir and a monthly 
and weekly newsletter. The drama team, 
"Effervescence" meets weekly and per- 
formed this year at the fall state BSU 
conference, held at Eagle Eyre. The liturgi- 
cal dance team interprets Christian music 
through motion. The choir is New Psalm 
Singers. They perform locally as well as 
around the state, such as in churches in 
Richmond, Suffolk and Virginia Beach. 

In the area of community service. 




Row 1; Renae Mitchell, Stephanie Bekhor, Heather Caplinger, Elaine Toffenetti, Tom Collins, Melissa 
Stone, Ellen Kirby, Maria Cordle, Kristie Kimsey, Melanie Stone, Kim Keffer, Karen Perry, Katherine 
Smithley, Heather Tierney, Sarah Ainsley, Amy Montgomery, Julie Harris Row 2: Doug Smith, 
Holly Collins, Katie Grogan, Lisa Crabbs, Donna Ragsdale, Bridget Deel, Anne Garrison, Cheryl 
Hess, Kelly Barke, Jessica Kaminski, Gwendolyn VanCleef, Tracy Louk, Jam&s Johnson, Jeff 
Earnhardt, Jason Rhody, Tiffany Acors, Deborah Kidd Row 3: Hunter Robinson, Hal Huser, Tim 
Noel, Jason Hartzog, Matt Beland, Jeff Oliver, Jeff Huffman, Stephen Farmer, Thomas Hogge, Randy 
Dunn, Brian Clark, Richard Guinto, Douglas LaRose, Joe King, Thomas Dolby, Michael Maxwell, 
Jennifer Burnfeld, Krissi Dale 



BSU members participate in service at a 
nursing home, a juvenile detention home 
and on week-long trips during spring and 
Christmas break. This year a group went to 
Atlanta during Christmas to help at a 
mission center, work in a thrift shop and 
help at a soup kitchen. There is also a 
ministry for migrant workers in the fall 
and Saturday Adoption each month, where 
college students spend time with children 
to play games and learn together. Students 
also go on weekend retreats to different 
churches to help with youth programs. 

Alpha Phi Omega is a national co- 
ed service fraternity with approximately 80 
active members, triple the original mem- 
bership of 1989. Interaction at projects and 
the pledging process helps the members to 
maintain a strong bond with one another. 
Fellowship is an important part of APO, 
with members sponsoring picnics, brother 
Olympics, hay-rides and secret pals. 
Throughout the year, APO worked with 
the chapter, university, and nation through 
various service projects, such as work at 
the Mercy House, Wildlife Center and the 
Special Olympics. Alpha Phi Omega 
provided its members a great opportunity 
to meet people and have fun while provid- 
ing valuable assistance to those in need. 



Baptist 
Student Union 



305 



Row 1: Randi Gische, Marilynne Eder Row 2: Cindy Schmitt, Laurie Grey, Bonnie 
Rosenblatt, Jennifer Branch, Kim Birnbaum, Emily Levenson 



B*nai B'rith 
Hillel 




Members of Hillel gather at Mary Washington College 
at Fredericksburg after an all day long rapid trip on 
the Rappahonaock River. Non-religious adventures, 
such as this, made up a large part of Hille's diverse 
agenda. 



Row 1 : Kim Ronald, Patti Studwell, Priscilla Demeo, Jen Horan, Christina Campo, Aniy 
Leary Row 2: Laura Brown, Brett Sabin, Mimi Granados, Melissa Poliquin, Brian Fyock 
Row 3: Tom Bozarycki, Joe Kornik, Jim McDaniel, Father John 




CCM 




Freely Religious 



JMU offers an 
array of different 

religious clubs, 
Hillel and CCM 



B'nai B'rith Hillel is JMU's only organiza- 
tion that represents the Jewish faith. Its 33 
members sponsors religious, social, and 
cultural programs throughout the year. 
Religious events include monthly student- 
run shabbat (sabbath) services, the "home 
hospitality" program which involves 
spending high Jewish holidays such as Rosh 
Hashana and Yom Kippur with local Jewish 
families. Other holidays include Sukkot, 
Chanukah, and Passover. 

Social events include bagel brunches, 
parties and road trips to Hillel chapters at 
other nearby colleges, like GWU and Mary 
Washington. 

Cultural events include educational 
programs about the Jewish heritage, such 
as programs about Israel and the annual 
Holocaust Remembrance Day held each 
spring. Finally, JMU's Hillel works with 
Temple Beth EI in Harrisonburg through 
leading religious services on occasion, and 
through having Rabbi^Biatch talk to mem- 
bers about issues of concern. 



CCM is JMU's Catholic Campus Minis- 
try. In addition to weekly mass held in 
Grafton-Stovall Theatre, the members of 
CCM enjoy many social, spiritual, and 
service activities. 

Father John Grace leads the student 
organization, and is viewed more as a 
friend than a figurehead. He has even been 
known to visit student hangouta and 
parties to socialize with his congregation. 

CCM has semiformals and different 
types of friendly, casual gatherings at their 
Main Street house. 

Members find spiritual fulfillment 
through weekend retreats, bible studies, 
and small group discussions about the faith. 

Harvest of Hope, a gleening trip is one 
service project that CCM sponsors. Mem- 
bers gather up leftover produce from 
harvested fields. The food is then given to 
the needy. CARS is another well-known 
CCM service project. Catch A Ride Safely 
offers students a safe ride home after 
weekend parties 



307 



Brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha cheer on their friends 
during the step show. Students for Minority Outreach 
and the NAACP encouraged the promotion of pride in 
ethnicity. In addition the organizations helped attract 
strong minorities to enroll at JMU. 

The Students for Minority Outreach help in sponsoring 
the annual step show held on Black Freshman 
Weekend. The stepshow was always an impressiye 
display of rhythm, timing and terrific coordination by 
all the members. 




SMO 




Row 1: Larissa Campbell, Marcia Daughtry, Veleka Studivant Row 2: Alexia McCombs, 
Yolanda Hawkes, Shante Parker, Dawn Smith, Monyette Freeman Row 3: Shauna Miller, 
Ayanna Lane, Terri Houston, Vanessa Evans, Teri Folston 



308 



^ 



Gaining Ground 



NAACP and Students for 

Minority Outreach Aim to 

Inform and Educate 



There are several groups on the JMU 
campus aimed toward emphasizing the role 
of minorities. Students for Minority Out- 
reach and the National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People all serve as 
organizations to encourage equality and 
representation of minorities on campus. 

Students for Minority Outreach assists . 
the Admissions Office in the recruitment of 
minorities. The group , in conjunctyion 
with the admissions staff, sponsors Annual 
Black Awareness Day and Black Freshman 
Weekend events. Such programs introduce 
prospective students to JMU and its minor- 
ity organizations, while giving SMO 
members an opportunity to share their 
excitement about the black experience at 
JMU. As a result of such extensive plan- 
ning, these two programs significantly 
increase black enrollment at JMU, hence 
bringing JMU a bit closer to truly being the 
ultimate university. 

In addition the NAACP further 
empahsizes the importance of minorities on 
campus. JMU's chapter stays active not 
only in the social advancement of minori- 
ties, but also in political and economic 
aspects. The NAACP played a vital role in 
bringing JMU and Harrisonburg one step 
closer to equality. 






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NAACP 



Row 1: Kishia Tutt, Christie Lovelace, Naceema Thompson Row 2: LaChanda Lipscomb, 
Stephaney Foster, Erica Bates, Shannon Thome Row 3: Shelby Brown, Camellia Taylor, 
Avis Hicks 



309 



Members of Kappa Kappa Psi enjoy a good, dean 
wrestling match during their fall retreat. Members 
spent plenty of time together in both the band and the 
fraternitv- This allowed them to make close and 
lasting friendships. 



Kappa Kappa Psi memebers fill up on a pancake 
breakfast during a retreat. Retreats were used to plan 
and organize group goals and objectives, but were also 
a source of entertainment and socialization. Members 
bacame close because of times like this. 

Tau Beta Sigma member displays a pillow bearing the 
names of a big sister-little sister pair. Finding out who 
your big sister is is one of the most special and 
memorable moments of being involved in anya 
sorority. 




Tau Beta Sigma 



310 



Row 1: Jodi Stewart, Allison Schweisguth, Laura Fadely, Elizabeth Arritt Row 2: Jill Kautz, 
Jennifer LeLacheur, Miranda Hopkins, Kelli Burr Row 3: Lori Page, Melinda Taylor, 
Clover Lambert, Rachel Miller, Christina Rebich, Sherry Gowell, Danielle Roeber Row 4 
Kwan Lou, Michelle Joyce, Christina Gibson, Heather Meeuwissen Row 5: Katie 
Goodman, Jennifer McQueen, Jeannette Lavere, Erica Jarnecke, Susan Walker, Jennifer 
Clarke 




Ban d Bondi ng 



Band Fraternities 

Organize Band 

Activities and have 

Fun 



James Madison University's Band 
Department sponsors two honors groups 
that help their instrumentahsts expand their 
talent. Tau Beta Sigma and Kappa Kappa 
Psi offer extensive service in the area of 
music at JMU. 

Tau Beta Sigma is a National Honorary 
Band Sorority whose members work to 
better university bands and their programs 
through service. The Eta Rho chapter at 
JMU was founded in March of 1987. Each 
sister is expected to usher at concerts, work 
with the Marching Royal Dukes and 
particpate in their Adopt- A-Highway 
program. 

TBS works together with Kappa Kappa 
Psi to acheive their goals in spreading the 
joys of music, service and friendship. Both 
TBS and Kappa Kappa Psi coordinate some 
social and service activities with Sigma 
Alpha lota and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. 

Kappa Kappa Psi is a National Honorary 
Band Fraternity dedicated to service for 
collegiate band programs as well as to the 
college and local communities. JMU's Eta 
Omicron chapter of Kappa Kappa Psi was 
founded on November 9, 1990. The frater- 
nity serves as coordinators for the Marching 
Royal Dukes, the Symphonic band and the 




Row 1: Kara Schwab,Jill Armstrong, Kathy Greene, Sean Gray, Jeremy Brown, Katie 
Wethman, Ralph Nichols Row 2: Tiffany Roose, Gabrielle Bilcher, Sharon Lovering, 
Sharon Scott, Jeannie Palmer, Dawn Bilello Row 3: Karen Harris, Amy Mehnert, Gail 
Williams, Jeff Carriker, Bill Matlock, Sam Cavaliere, Lisa McGarvey Row 4: William 
Moore, Benjamin Prunty, Clint Pazdera, Kent Baake, Kelly Floyd 



Concert band. Their activities include 
fundraisers for various bands as well as 
social functions for band members of both 
the Marching Royal Dukes and visiting 
bands. Their service projects include 
BigBrothers/Big Sisters and free concerts. 

The Eta Omicron chapter strives to 
promote the ideals of service, brotherhood 
and leadership. This ideals are promul- 
gated through the completion of service 
projects which include commissioning 
musical works, donating monetary gifts to 
the band and music scholarship programs. 

They help support the operation of of 
large scale events such as the Parade of 
Champions, the Marching Royal Dukes 
Band Camp, the Virginia Music Education 
Association Scholarship Auditions and the 
Virginia Band and Orchestra Directors 
Association's All State Band and Orchestra 
Auditions. 

Both Tau Beta Sigma and Kappa Kappa 
Psi utilize and promote the talents of their 
members. Through these talents, the band 
organizations at JMU succeed in extensively 
supporting the music groups throughout 
campus. 



Kappa Kappa 
Psi 



311 



Sigma Alpha Iota sisters are dressed up in to look their 
best for their inititationceremony ■ New initiates are 
dressed in white gowns, while their big sisters stand 
by them and proudly display paddles made for them 
hv their little sisters. 



The Contemporary Gospel singers always put on a 
powerful, full-of-feeling performance. This gospel 
singing group is one of the largest and most talented 
organizations of its kind; members have travelled and 
performed extensively for years. 



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312 



Row 1 : Mary Barret, Jenna Crawford, Meloney Layman, Lillian Gregorio, Mandy Harris, 
Grace Manuel Row 2: Nancy Labuguen, Wendi Carter, Lisa Munafo, Melinda Gryder, 
Theresa Schatteles, Sarah Allen, Charlene Walker, Beth Howell, Carrie Loughry Row 3: 
Sheri Ellis, Caryn Widrick, Patricia Daggett, Sandra Pafford, Lara Brittain, Stepahnie Erb, 
Tonya Holland, Emily Black, Alexia Wanik, Amy Riley, Kara Johnson 



hi] 



\ * 




Musical Masters 



Gospel Singers and Sigma 

Alpha lota Make the Most out 

of their Musical 

Backgrounds 



Sigma Alpha Iota is an interna- 
tional women's fraternity. The JMU chapter 
was founded in 1958. The members are 
talented musicians, dedicated to the 
support of music on campus and in the 
community. SAl sisters are involved in 
many service projects, yet there is still time 
to have fun. One project the sisters assisted 
with was the 1993 Contemporary Music 
Festival. Other service projects include 
performing at nursing homes, ushering 
music events, and participating in the 
WVPT public television telethon. Sisters are 
involved academically as well. Each 
member must maintain a 2.5 GPA overall 
and a 3.0 GPA in music. 

There is a poem that the sisters of 
SAl quote: In old JMU the girls that are 
always true are found in SAl. Wearers of 
red and white who stand for right to do the 




Row 1 : Mona Martin, Niki Jackson, Melissa Coleman, Shanette Kearney, Katherine Lundy , Katrice Jones, Wanda Davis, 
Bryan Patterson, Daren Thomas, Darrell Peterson, Joanne Ware, Andrea Wvche, Pam Fofeman, Andrea Brown, Angela 
Brown, Tiffany Mayfield Row 2: Maria Robinson, Chandra Montgomery, Nicole McCoy, Joy Bellamy, Pamela 
Anthony, Lisa Winn, Melvin Wooding, Victor Myers, Anthony Ward, Cheryl Hamilton, Tiajuana Freeman, Dione 
Richardson, Martika Robinson, Kristie Bowie, Angela Robinson Row 3: Christina Pritchett, Tosha Robinson, Chimisa 
Gordon, Tamara McLaurin, Anita Jones, Marlene Kenney, Tina Pittman, Anthony Jones, Ben Clay, Renae Vance, Greg 
Cooper, David Ginn, Kim Gilmer, Alveeta Taylor, Toshia Battle, Michele Moore, Tanya Tatum 



deed or die. If you want a girl to take a part, 
to do a stunt, or break a heart, just ask an 
SAl. For the girls who do the things in style, 
the girls that make this life worthwhile are 
found in SAL 

Another musical group is the 
Contemporary Gospel Singers. With 
membership reaching approximately 200, 
CGS is one of the largest organizations on 
campus. They perform annually at Home- 
coming and Parent's Weekend, and at the 
Christmas tree lighting ceremony. CGS is 
actively involved in the community by 
participating in many competitions and 
singing at churches across Maryland and 
Virginia. The CGS perform traditional 
gospel and hymn music, and appeal to the 
audience through their hand-clapping and 
swaying back and forth. 



Contemporary 
Gospel Singers 



313 



Janet Driscoll, Christy Mumford, Kent Buraker, and 
Gayle Cohen work out the kinks on a final edition of 
the Breeze. Being a member of a publication staff was 
very time consuming, but rewarding when the final 
product is complete final 



Swervyn' Mervyn sits at the DJ desk behind the glass 
enclosure. Being a part of the WXJM staff allowed one 
to express personality and musical tastes to the entire 
campus and Harrrisonburg community over the air 
waves. 







Row 1: Brookie Scholten, Christy Mumford, Gayle Cohen, Donna Ragsdale Row 2: 
Heather O'Neil, Jonathan Ross, Michael Keats, Brandi Hudson, Matt Warner, Janet 
Driscoll, Ken Buraker, MJ Carscallen Row 3: Jessica Kaminski, Flip DeLuca, Grant Jerding, 
Lee Bumgarner, Kate Mcfadden, Jessica Jenkins Row 4: Mike Heffner, Steve Miranda, Lee 
Ray, Matt Scwabel, Rob Kaiser, Joseph Kornik, Vince Rhodes 



314 







Paper and Air 



The Breeze and WXJM Enable 

Campus-Wide 

Communication and 

Information 



Only one station had students 
tuning in to hear classic rock, funk, metal, 
disco, rap, jazz and progressive music. 
WXJM, JMU's own radio station, offered 
something to satisfy most of the diverse 
tastes of the student population. Students 
tuned in at scheduled times to hear their 
preferred music as well as their favorite 
disc jockeys. Personalities included 
Swervyn' Mervin playing music from the 
Reagan years, the B Man mixing music 
with humor and Jim Acosta giving JMU a 
voice with his talk show. The variety of the 
station was the cause of its success and 
popularity among students and faculty. 

The Breeze, JMU's official school 
newspaper, brought news and entertain- 




Row 1: Patrick Belcher, Eugene Robertson, Blake Peddicord, Millard Filmore Row 2: Amy 
Wan, Marcia Edmundson, Sarah Fischer, Kelly McFall Row 3: Johnnie Bohland, Erica 
Reid, Karen Wardzala, Todd Lowman, Eric Andros, Scott Gilbert, Ryan Netzer, Marc 
Boysworth, John Daub, Mike Baldwin, Suzanne Clarke, Julie Conroy, Erik Sellin 



ment to the university. The sections of the 
paper allowed a variety as well, ranging 
from JMU campus to world events. The 
Breeze often addressed controversial issues 
and many times it heard from students who 
were angry about the material it presented. 
The Breeze stood firm in its attempt to be 
unbiased and was not afraid to print 
opposing opinions. The editorial page was 
often filled with letters written by miffed 
students over positions seemingly taken by 
the Breeze. Other sections included world 
events, campus activities, the arts and 
sports. 

Both WXJM and the Breeze fulfilled 
their attempts to be a voice for the JMU 
community while catering to the students. 



WXJM 



315 



Under Pressure 



Bluestone staff 
members, a bit crazy, 
but devoted to their 



cause 



Who else would spend a month each 
semester without any significant sleep or 
food? Who else would cheerfully sacrifice 
friendships, grades, health and sanity to 
spend a week and a half in a room with no 
windows? Who else would sleep only on 
couches constructed in state penetentiary 
work programs and take Fruity Pebbles and 
Gatti's pizza as their only means of sur- 
vival? Who else, but the talented and 
diligent students at the Bluestone, who 
were awfully nice, but not extremely 
intelligent, as seen in the fact that they 
agreed to be members of the yearbook staff. 
The 1992-93 Bluestone staff was a group 
of students who came together to work 
extremely hard on a product that would 
likely earn them more criticism than praise. 
Why did they do it? Certainly not for the 
per-hour wage that made migrant farm 
work seem inviting. The Bluestone staff 



members were students who enjoyed 
writing, editing, designing layouts and 
taking pictures; students who were willing 
to work ridiculous hours and provide the 
university with a worthy publication. The 
staff was content with all the new friend- 
ships that developed from their interaction. 

The loss of a social life and health during 
each deadline was made up for by the 
comraderie and memories that were created 
during the year. And each completed 
deadline was an excuse for another party or 
two. 

Bluestone staffers also had the advan- 
tage of seeing all the facets of ]MU from a 
unique perspective — through lenses and 
interviews. They got to know the students, 
athletes, faculty, and institutuion like no 
one else would... if it weren't for the year- 
book. 




Row 1: Joe Guilfoyle Row 2: Kristi Shackelford, Lisa Manzo, Vasha Hunt, Carrie 
Desmond, Colleen Magin, Matt Humke Row 3: Kevin Bucher, Heather Gustin, Joe Olson, 
David Holick, Christine Letsky, Jason Williams Row 4: Rebecca Haile, Jennifer Howard, 
Van Clayton, Cindy Scott, Tiffany Gobbi, John Rogers, Kate Travers, Chris Haws, Shannon 
Bailey 

316 




I 





Sports Editor John Rogers goes over some proof pages 
with his assistant Shannon Bailey. Proof pages let the 
staff see a prehminary copy of what a final copy of a 
page will look like. 

Volunteer staff member Tiffany Gobbi yawns as she 
attempts to reference an old yearbook for new ideas. 
Snacks, creativity, patience, and a little bit of dementia 
are necessary to make it through a deadline night. 




Features Editor Carrie Desmond and assistant Cindy 
Scott attempt to make sense of the Macintosh computer 
system used to produce the entire book. The computer 
system was new to the staff this year, and modernized 
the layout production techni(!Jues. 



Volunteers Rebecca Haile and Jennifer Howard work 

diligently on articles for the organizations section of 

the book. Some students offered their services to the 

staff to earn credit hours for joumahsm practicums, 

others just enjoyed the experience. 




317 





30JNBV TO 

JMPACX 




BATTLE READY.The sorors of Sigma Gamma Rho 

sorority, inc. break tradition by performing steppes 
normally associated with the fraternities. Sigma 
Gamma Rho won first place in the Homecoming 
Block Show. 

SMOOTH. Alpha Chi Rho brother, John Hykes, 
sings "Danke schon" to the Anchorsplash crowd at 
Grafton-Stovall.The Mr. and Ms. Ancorsplash 
competition consisted of lip sync, best dressed and 
best legs contests. 

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^\0 Greeks Divider 



GREEKS 




A segment of the campus population 
became involved in groups that were unique in 
membership, yet served similar purposes. These 
groups were the greek organizations. Generally 
known as social organizations, fraternities and 
sororities sponsored a variety of activities, rang- 
ing from service to social and academic to 
fundraising. 

"Greeks", as members of these organiza- 
tions were called, were seen wearing their let- 
ters, pins and badges. While members of each 
greek organization promoted their individual 
group, greeks held a similar bond. Through the 
Panhellenic, Inter-Fraternity and Black Greek 
Caucus councils, a sense of unity was shared 
between all greeks. 

Each year the campus would experience 
"rush", as prospective members learned more 
about the organizations and their members. 
Many chose to pursue membership by pledging, 
while others decided to maintain their indepen- 
dent status. As greeks, students did not separate 
themselves from the rest of the student body, 
but chose a different method to make an impact. 



UNIFIED 



Greeks Divider 3^9 



Alpha Kappa Alpha 

'and 




Alpha Kappa Lamba 



Alpha Kappa Alpha 
sorority is very dedi- 
cated to participation in 
service work for many 
different organizations. 

The Lamda Chi 
Chapter at JMU has 
given the Harrisonburg 
community a huge 
amount of their time and 
care. A few years ago, 
AKAs adopted 
Waterman Street. They 
have taken on the 
responsibilty of beautify- 
ing the street. The 
sorority also has an 
adopted grandmother 
who they visit and chat 
with regularly. 

Other service projects 
the sisters take part in 
include Big Brothers /Big 
Sisters, financial dona- 
tions to historically black 
colleges, and WVPT 
Telethons. 

Alpha Kappa Alpha 
was founded 84 years 
ago, on January 15, 1908, 
at Howard University to 
be a primarily service 
oriented group. 



Despite the busy 
schedule of community 
projects the AKAs take 
part in, they manage to 
find time to socialize 
together. 

The sisters sponsor 
various parties and 
dances from which the 
proceeds go to benefit 
charities. 

The annual stepshow 
maintains a demanding 
practice schedule. AKAs 
work together to perfect 
their routine. The 
practices are difficult, but 
the time spent together 
strengthens the bond of 
AKA. 

Alpha Kappa Lambda 
received their National 
charter at JMU in the fall 
of 1987. They moved 
into their Greek Row 
home in 1990, and 
became the newest 
fraternity on the Row. 
Since then their brother- 
hood has dramatically 
increased its 

numbers and visibility in 
the Greek community. 



AKL has also let its talent 
shine in the sport's 
department. For the past 
two years, the brothers of 
AKL have won Alpha 
Chi Omega's annual 
"Frisbee Fling". They 
have also excelled in 
intramural sports. 

AKL also hosts plenty 
of parties with other 
sororities and fraterni- 
ties. One of AKLs best 
known bashes is the 
annual Kamikaze party, 
named for the popular 
mixed drink. 

AKL was founded at 
the University of Califor- 
nia in Berkeley. Its 
founders saw leadership, 
loyalty, scholarship, and 
Judeo-Christian prin- 
ciples as fundamentals 
for their organizations. 

AT JMU, AKL strives 
to maintain the founding 
precepts. Through doing 
this Alpha Kappa Lamda 
has been able to keep a 
growing and strengthen- 
ing brotherhood. 




Alpha Kappa Alphas smile and 
make their traditional hand 
signal. Friends made in college 
often last through an entire 
lifetime. 



A group of AKAs gather 
outside on a sunny day. When 
the weather was nice, outdoor 
functions became more 
popular. 



32-0 Greeks 




'>A v*". 'ir'J 



w 



n 




Alpha Kappa Lamda brothers 
dance and sing to Yellow 
Submarine at Anchorsplash. 
Delta Gamma's annual event 
brought good spirited 
competition. 

AKA sister Tanya Jernigan 
performs at the step show. 
These carefully choreographed 
performances were time 
consuming, but fim for the 
members. 




ir ^^ '•*■■ a ''5^3 


J\^ '* r 3.» 


mi 




Alpha Kappa Alpha Row I, Volanda Stewart, Tia Mason. Row 2; Eleanor Ferguson, Patrice 
Johnson, Tanya Jeniigan, Alease |ohnson, Shawnda Wilson. Row 3: Deirdre Bland, Shanell Whitney, Janet 
l^ee, Maria Robinson, Carolyn Friend Row 4: Erika McCullough, Nadine Sitteard, Tina Pittman, Rosalyn 
Pitts, Erika White 



Alpha Kappa Lambda Row I: Joseph Slurch, Rudv B^Kiuiron, Ted Fair, Alain ]ourgesen Row 2: 
Chad Triolet, Matt Aversano, Keith Theisen, Chris Chickerman, Kirk Snyder, Mike Wagnes, |im Acri, Brant 
Edwards Row 3: Tom Barton, Kip Wilcox, Dave Helfen, Steven Restive, William Gale, Brian Kildee, Kyle 
Meyer, Chris Hays, Neil Quinlan Row 4: Scott Riesett, Robert Morris, James Fugit, Scott Noon, James Nelson, 
Eric Weis 



Greeks 



321 



ASAs Betsey Pittard, Nicole 
Sutter, Wendy Schuyler, Paton 
Robinson and Rene Giese 
celebrate after completing 
ASAs first place Greek Sing 
performance. 

Alpha Sigma Taus Megan 
Baldwin, Tricia Keegan, Joanna 
Snvder and Amy Collier gather 
together before a meeting. 
Sorority members had to attend 
many meetings. 






Alpha Sigma Alpha Row ItStephame Watkins, Janet Feme, Margi Carter, Trina Malls, Karen 
Hunt, Dana Weber, Bene Lippin, Hilary Duhan, Libby Barnes, Kim Miller, Erin Knapp, Kimberly Muse, Erin 
O'Meara Row 2: Jen Atkinson, Adrienne Brown, Jennifer Banks, Melissa Copeland, Maryjo Ackerman, 
Elizabeth Clifford, Jennifer Watkins, Katie Stover, Elizabeth Brice, Sheri Jones, Delores Kreiger, Casey 
Collier, Charlotte Cerrtti, Tammy Srskic, Bath Jamerson, Anneliese Hancock, Karen Engstrom Row 3: Ginny 
Vaughan, Lori Rogers. Palti Shanahan, Susie Peterson, Dana Martin, Betsey Pittard, Debbie Murphy, Blair 
Wilson, Rachel Everett, Lisa Knipsel, Wiley Shelor, Caroline Wallace, Brooke Taylor, Molly Taylor, Cathy 
Browning, Jennifer Irrgang, Lori Stafford, Debbie Kissell, Tavy Shepherd Row 4: Erin Hoffman, Patti 
Schmitz, Justine Stevens, Colleen Murphy, Aimee Ratliff, Mindy Wilkins, Nikie Gililland, Elissa Gellis, 
Gillian Adams, Allison Smith, Denise Mullin, Heather Shippie, Jennifer Cooper, Trene Gease,Kini Towry, 
Colleen Phalen, Katie Bennett, Shirin Irani, Angela Justis, Maureen Cunneen, Alison Swenton Row 5: 
Cheryl Scully, Sandee Williamson, Marsha McLeod, Wendy Schuyler, Missi Aleski, Juhe Simpson, Allison 
Eraser, Maleah Zalubowski, Catherine Bamett, Juliette Vohs, Amanda Shaw, Kelly Duke, Erica Hawley, 
Lauren Melton, Amy Garst, Doran McBride, Nicole Sutter, Paton Robison. Beth Stanley, Dana Shitlett, 
Nicole Habav. Beth Mearham. 




Alpha Sigma TaU Row l : Diane Reed, Carrie Hughes, Jenn Weede, Brooke Rhode Row 2; Hope 
Tunstall, Mary Lvnn Wilmore, Lisa Potter, Courtnev Cupp, Ashley Parker, Amy Petrucci, Adelaide Averv, 
Joanna Snyder Row 3: Tara Lane, Marie Dugan, Emily Beard, Allison Smith, Nancy Bograd, Jill Thurston, 
Karen Brooks, Joanne Schmidt, Tracy Glanton, Sarah Goode, Jyoti Suri, Laura Weber Row 4: Jennifer 
Schwalka, Christine Shelly, Dahlia Voss, Maria Reilly, Kara Murley, Stacie Moukas, Angela Spickard, Anne 
Collins, Amy Burns, Marion Haynes, Jennifer Erskine, Allison Miller, Anne Altaffer, Elizabeth Hudenburg, 
Mimi Jordqan, Erin Cannelly, Katie Dowling Row 5; Taylor Greenup, Kristin Rozun, Amy Thronburg, 
Kelly Schmidt, Lisa Bashey, Shannon Chappell, Jennifer Sineavage, Diana Crupi, Sheila Kelly, Meagan 
Storey, Laura Crump, Susan Kerns, Amy Long, Amanda Lowthian, Kathryn M itchell, Jill Barnard, Alicia 
Hamp Row 6: Carroll Taylor, Karen Flinton, Alicia Greenstine, Carol Sweeney. Michelle Vestal, Liz Buford, 
Katheryn Retcher, Carey Nicodemus, Shawnthea Morrissette, Amy Linder, Coleen Lindgren, Krista 
Langheim. Libby Wilson, Reilly-Ann Frank, Betsy Borders, Kate McFadden, Chandra Hohert, Katie Kenyon, 
Lisa Beck, Laurie Houck, Debbie Schebe 



322 ^^^^^ 



A 




Alpha Sigma Alpha 
and 




Alpha Sigma Tau 



Alpha Sigma Alpha 
sorority has four goals 
for its members: intellec- 
tual, physical, social, and 
spiritual development. 

To further their 
academic endeavors, 
ASA sets up tutoring 
sessions for its members. 
In addition they have 
consistently maintained 
a high cumulative grade 
point average. 

For physical fitness, 
ASA sisters can be found 
at Purcell Park jogging 
and at Godwin attending 
aerobics classes. 

Social development 
occurs through a wide 
variety of activities 
including everything 
from service projects to 
fun parties and mixers. 
ASAs dedicate much of 
their time to their two 
philanthropies— the S. 
June Center and Special 
Olympics. To raise 
money for their charities, 
ASA sponsors 



an annual Rock-A-Thon. 
During this event, which 
takes place in front of the 
house, sisters can be seen 
rocking back and forth in 
their chairs. 

ASA also throws a 
number of exciting 
parties each year. Some 
of the more memorable 
events included the 
Holiday Champagne 
Party, Jean Jam, and the 
Rose Formal. 

Sisters of Alpha Sigma 
Alpha can be seen all 
over campus. Members 
are in the President's 
Cabinet, Mortarboard, 
Golden Key National 
Honor Society, and 
Who's Who. At football 
and basketball games 
some ASAs can be seen 
performing as Dukettes. 

Along with campus 
contributions, ASA is 
very spirited in the 
Greek community, 
usually placing high in 
Anchorsplash, Derby 




Days, and Greek Week. 
Through campus activi- 
ties, ASAs are able to 
fufill their four-fold aim 
and achieve a strong 
sisterhood. 

Alpha Sigma Tau 
sorority offers many 
benefits to its members. 
AST, founded nationally 
in 1899, looks for mem- 
bers who will carry on 
traditions by being active 
in the Greek community 
and on campus. 

Each year AST 
sponsors a Jail-A-Thon to 
raise money for its 
philanthropy. The 
American Cancer 
Society. The Jail-A-Thon 
is co-sponsored with 
another Greek organiza- 
tion. People are placed 
in the AST "jail" until 
enough donations are 
made to free them. 
These donations are then 
given to AST's philan- 
thropy. 



Members of AST take 
part in a wide range of 
extracurricular activities 
such as honor societies, 
academic organizations, 
and the Breeze. In recent 
years, members have 
been honored as Greek 
Woman of the Year. 

On bid night, AST 
sisters traditionally dress 
in togas to greet their 
new pledges. In addition 
to activities such as 
dressing up for bid night, 
AST also has a variety of 
annual activities for its 
members. The Yellow 
Rose formal is held each 
fall, and twice each year 
members travel to the 
University of Virginia to 
the Foxfield Races. 

Besides their tradi- 
tional events, AST also 
takes part in an array of 
closed mixers with 
almost every other 
organization on the row. 




AST sisters gather together 
during the Pi Kappa Alpha 
Chartering. ASTs and other 
Greeks joined in welcoming the 
Pikes to JMU's Greek Commu- 
nitv- 



ASA Big Sisters and Little 
Sisters gather by a fireplace. 
E\ents like this were limited to 
the sisters and helped bring 
everyone closer together. 



Greeks 323 



Alpha Phi Alpha brothers enjoy 
each others company while 
thev chat with non-members 
about the benefits of Greek life. 
Being part of a fraternity added 
to the college experience. 





Alpha Phi Row 1: Laura Mizeras, Cindy Kilmon, Manju Kurian, Cathy Withrow, Lori Katz, Gina Kraay Row 2: Cheryl Handy, Heather Oldham, Regina Hall, 
Jennifer Lovelidge, Allyson Luttrell, Leigh Wilson, Heather O'Neil, Wendy Morgan, Sandra Moscoso, Deborah Dallas, Steffani Beland. Sarah Barrv. Rob^Ti Sclar, Resha 
Jeneby Row 3: Allison Wood, Jenniter Kohut, Tracy McEvilly, Damia Dunn, Jennifer Butter, Lisa Barnes. Denise Dickinson, Jenn Gregorio, Adrienne Towers, Couri 
Saunders, Amy Waters, Karen Wunder, Bridget! Streiff, Tonya Cheek, Tonya King, Car\'n Powell, Pam Reichers, Caryn Jones, Danielle Roach Row 4; Liz Moore, Lauren 
Allyn, CarolvTi Gagnon, Jenna Thompson, Jenn Powers, Jennifer Drummond, Jen Coughlin, Kristin O'Sullivan, Aimee Lockman, Jennifer Kagey, Jennifer Caplan, Rebekah 
Carriker, Amy Jeffries. Samatha Hays, Molly McConnick, Candy White, Heather SheU, Torey Weiss, Susan Greer. Charis Graeser, Tricia Hildebrand, Jennifer Owen Row 
3: Kim Copeland, Juhe Hauser. Lynne Wolf, Michelle Keene, Michelle Averette, Stephanie Lane, Kristen PhiUips, W^endy Wright, Ginnie Henry, Jennifer Kallas, Cynthia 
Grant, Angie Gray, Rebecca Carlson, Terri LeMay, Susan Goldstein, Meghan Johnson, Kris Willey, Erica Seligman, Toni Puckett, LaurieAnn Dick, AUson Cooper, Kate 
Orison 




Alpha Phi Alpha Kevin Frankilin, Ramon Sutherland, Michael Spencer, Jonathan Page, James Clingenpeel Row 2: Allan 
Johnson, Christopher Williams, Wilson Randolph, Leo Barbour, Thomas Rivers, Melvin Strane, Napoleon Ibiezugbe Row 3: 
Shawn Brown, Charles Waddy, Samuel Rucker, Arin Wulfe, Mark Robinson, Brandon Martin 



.ir^ 




Alpha Phi sisters start their 
performance with an illusion of 
reverence. Creativity added to 
the audience appeal and 
overall success of each 
performance. 



Their choir robes traded in for 
slim-fittng dresses, the sisters 
of Alpha Phi complete their 
show with excitement. The 
switch of pace took everyone 
watching by surprise. 




Alpha Phi 
and 




Alpha Phi Alpha 



Alpha Phi is the latest 
addition to JMU's 
collection of sororities. 
After the 1990 
Panhellenic Rush , 
national representitives 
of Alpha Phi came to 
JMU. They sponsored 
different get act^uainted 
events and scheduled 
interviews. After a 
semester of hard work, 
Alpha Phi became 
official. Much has 
changed since then. 
Over the last few 
years. Alpha Phi has 
grown and become more 
united. Nationally, 
Alpha Phi is one of the 
strongest sororities. It 
can claim chapters in 
both the United States 



and Canada. Very few 
sororities are represented 
at an international level. 

Alpha Phi sisters take 
part in all aspects of 
campus life along with 
their sister activities. 
Alpha Phi is in the 
process of building 
traditions at JMU. As 
each year passes. Alpha 
Phi becomes a stronger 
sisterhood, with support- 
ive alumna and enthusi- 
astic new sisters. 

Alpha Phi Alpha 
fraternity came to JMU 
in 1979. Over the past 
fourteen years, its 
members have dedicated 
themselves to serving 
both the campus and 
local comniunity. Like 



many other Greek 
organizations. Alpha Phi 
Alpha has adopted a 
highway. They regularly 
clean a part of Route 33, 
just east of the city. 

Alpha Phi Alpha is 
also well known for their 
annual Thanksgiving 
food drive, in which they 
collect donations for 
local families. 

Alpha Phi Alphas also 
take the time to mix with 
the rest of the Greek 
community. In the past 
they have sponsored 
events with other 
groups, such as ASTs 
Jail-A-Thon. They also 
take time to impress 
audiences at the annual 
Step Show. 



Alpha rhi Alpha ^ct^i up a 
.1i>play table at JMU's student 
ictivities night. The brothers 
-ISO this opportunity to attract 
lotential new members for 
heir fraternity. 



Tanimi Bird and hi in 
Henrickson dress up for Alpha 
Phi's second round rush party. 
The psychedelic costumes 
were part of their Halloween 
theme. 



Greeks "^2-3 



Alpha Chi Omega 

and 




Deha Gamma 



Alpha Chi Omega 
sorority offered a variety 
of activities and opportu- 
nities for its members. 
Whether at the Red 
Carnation Ball held each 
fall or at the annual 
fundraiser, Frisbee Fling, 
AXs enjoyed spending 
time together. 

Each year AX spon- 
sored an all day field 
event where all the 
sports involved a 
Frisbee. Fraternities 
competed for prizes and 
had fun. All money 
was given to the Alpha 
Chi Omega Foundation, 
which divides and 
disperses the money to 
charities. 

Alpha Chi Omega was 
originally founded as a 
music sorority at 
DePauw University. 
Alpha Chi's original 
roots in the arts are still 
highly valued by the 
modem day organiza- 
tion. The chapter annu- 



ally supported the 
MacDowell Colony for 
Arts. Financial dona- 
tions from the sorority 
make it possible 
for artists, writers and 
musicians to work in an 
uninterrupted environ- 
ment. 

Alpha Chi Omega 
sisters were seen doing 
all kinds of things for the 
campus. This year, Erika 
Freihage was chosen Ms. 
Madison. Other mem- 
bers were in honor 
societies, student ambas- 
sadors, and service 
clubs. 

Being a member of 
AX offered a fuU social 
schedule. Along with 
parties with other 
Greeks, the sisters 
enjoyed movie nights 
and trips to Reddish 
Knob. This year the 
sisters even went on a 
hayride at Halloween. 
Whether the event were 
a sorority sponsored 



activity or just a bunch of 
friends hanging out at 
the house — Alpha Chis 
were sure to be found 
together. 

The sisters of Delta 
Gamma like to view 
themselves as more than 
a social organization. 
Aside from the 
sisterdates, formal, and 
theme parties, DG 
dedicates itself to 
charitable activities. 

Combatting blindness 
is the focal point of DGs 
philathropy. Each year, 
the sisters sponsor 
Anchorsplash to raise 
money for sight related 
organizations. 

While Anchorsplash is 
mainly a fundraiser, it is 
also a time for fun and 
games. The entire Greek 
community competes in 
all different events from 
swim meets to a beauti- 
ful eyes contest. The 
main event at 
Anchorsplash is the 




Aleks Nelson and Karin Eyrich 
show new E)G pledges some 
tradition. Candlelightings let 
sisters share special events in 
the lives with the rest of the 
sorority. 



Delta Gamma's Keary McLeod, 
Julie Kennedy, and Pek Quann 
Soon had a terrific time at 
Foxfield. The steeplechase 
event at UVA was very popular 
with JMU Greeks. 



crowning of Mr. and Ms. 
Anchorsplash. Contes- 
tants flaunt their humor 
and looks for a panel of 
judges. 

During Anchorsplash 
week, DG brings the 
fraternities and sororities 
closer together - physi- 
cally. Groups can earn 
points by collecting "Kiss 
Cards" from Greeks of 
the opposite sex. 

Delta Gamma sorority 
is one of the largest 
sororities in the nation, 
and is represented at 
over 120 colleges and 
universities. 

Around campus, DGs 
can be seen wearing 
their letters or their 
official badge, the golden 
anchor. The women of 
DG maintain a high level 
of individuaUty and 
diversity, and at the 
same time are a tightly 
knit group of friends. 



^2(3 Greeks 





Katie Howard, Karla Williams, Alpha Chi sister Michelle 



and Cindy Payne celebrate on 
bid night. Each year bid night 
allowed sororities to welcome 
their new members to the 
group. 



Gallice strides across the stage 
in the Ms. Anchorsplash 
competition. She was crowned 
Ms. Anchorsplash at the end of 
the show. 







l'***ru.i 


tt^^K^^^B^^tSv' 7 1 , tlh '' 



Alpha Chi Omega Kow l N-mcy eottmdatkT, t hn^hne VVorunt^ott, Katie I Imvard. Miclielk- 
Stough, Stacv Swenson, Erika Freihage, Ange Gulino, Kim Knight, Sarah Keelon Row 2: Melanie 
Anderson, Melissa Witt, AnneCarler Killman, Michele Minderlein. Kellv Sullivan, Randa Haddad, Alycia 
Oaklander, Rachel Naleppa, Marv Schutta, Allystra Little, Meredith LLnberger, Christi Cozens, Monica 
Finch, Stacy Campbell, Theresa Dino, Lori LaRocco Row 3: Renee Bradley, Jennifer Gillespie, Renee Moran, 
Stephanie Dean, Michele Labik, Jessica Hubley, Pam Jung, Laura Ballou, Kate Travers, Ana Calderon, Becca 
Fisher, Jennifer Owen, Jennifer Howard, Kristv Orringer, Jennifer Tavlor, Jennifer Sims, Colleen Magin, 
Mami O'Connell Row 4: Kim Hanover, Katie Galvin, Dana Wellens, Amy Warner, Karla Williams, Windy 
Hackett, Michele Hiatt, Gina Puleo, Ginjer Norris, Laura Doyle, Michele Baggan, Lisa Szlachianshyn, 
Michelle Berte, Jill Johnson, Jennifer Reed, Susan Fleming, Sarah Wampler, Jen O'Donnell, Ellen Osborne, 
Cindy Payne Row 5; Melissa Schultz, Susan Garden, Kim Bradham, Kristi Wulf, Kellv Tomlm, Jessica 
Menold, Jen Gracyalnv. Deb Black, Heather Hales, Laurie Reid, Jennifer Pilch, Elizabeth Wayland, Stuart 
Bane, Heather Kuhl, Jennv Forehand, Jennifer Phillips, Wendy Garpow, Jennie Kucinskis, Jennifer 
Williams, Deanne Heyer. LesUe Bums 



Delta Gamma Row L Mane Buntua, Michelle Winder, Melissa Stevens, Pek Quann Soon, Frandne 
Janz Row 2: Anne Kunkle, CaroUne DeSantis, Alison Winter, Donna Livingston, Aleks Nelson, Emily- 
Marie Parsons, Ursula Koenig, Julie Francis, Lee Anne Hurt, Suzy Thompson, Kimberly Wheeler, Jennifer 
Mardnko, Sherry Stancil, Becky Scott, Karen Haines Row 3: Jennifer Pritchett, Denise Pasquantino, 
Tiffany Flora, Tara Stoker, Kristen Smola, Andrea Johnson. Teresa Cash, Hannah Hinely, A.J. Sabold, 
Elizabeth Roach. Carrie Gordon, Kimberlv Scharenbrock, Rebecca Nelson, Loren Sikora. Jennifer Stimpson 
Row 4: Alanna Cho, LeAnn Ellyson, Julie McEntee, Courtney Johnson, Lisa Gusler, Karen Prosel, Michele 
Dickinson, Julie Gerber, Karin Starr, Christy Counts, Trida Lazarchic, Emily Smith, Erica jamecke, Kelli 
Crawford, Annalie Ames, Karen Grippo, Lesley Stone, Shaudv Moayery, Heather MacArthur Row 5: 
Karen Hublev. Nelly Nguyen, Caryn Organic, Wendi Carter, Karin E>Tich, Suzette Kuo, Rebecca Raine 



Greeks 32T 



Zeta Tau Alpha sisters chose a 
tropical theme for their 
Anchorsplash performance. 
The bright colors and singing 
drew attention to the perform- 
ing sisters. 

Brian Robilotta plays the sax , 

with his KDR brothers dancing 
in the background. The "Risky 
Business" look brought back 
memories for members of the 
audience 






Zeta Tau Alpha Row l : Claudine Collettc, Cathy Crider, Suzy Porter, Undy Daum, Lauren 
Maimone, Heather Quinn, Mary Stuart Boling, Pani Williams, Lynne Dohner, Leigha Bryan, Kim Shore, 
Suzanne Minogue, Joy Bellis, Monica Mabry, Christy Callan, Carrie Hartley. Emily Wilt, Caoilfhionn 
O'Drudy. Prissie Nguyen Row 2: Brande Schreiber, Anissa Callovvhill, Kim Kenyon, Lisa Petrille, Sonya 
Styerbenz, Amy Coccaro, Carmen Conrey, Melissa Roish, Beth Mann, Paulene Pakidis, Marjorie Maslayak, 
Megan Carrigan. Cosette Phillips, Leigh Sullivan, Jennifer Uram, Meg OConnor, Katie Daly, Lisa Errico 
Row 3: Kristin Willard, Allison Moore, Kimberly Roehrig, Anna Larson, Karen Ramsay, Heather McLeod, 
Christina Spenik, Ronce Bracket, Marcy Click, Sharon Romine, Lee Moore, Christy Starkcy, Barbara 
I lolland, Alaine Kopp. Tracey Armentrout, Elizabeth Robinson, Katherine Kirkup, Christine Gragnani. 
Katharine Caterson, Chnslie Savage Row 4 Kathv Wilson, Kimberly Kusek, Joan Eaton, Valerie Conner, 
Ashley Whitlock, Cameron Smith, Christina Thai, Andrea Dubin, Amy Higgins, Marci Target, Aimee 
Brilthart, Anne Carroll, Meghan Burke, Amy Ordakowski, Helen Se\ton, Cannie Graham, Candi Law, Li'^a 
Wheeler, Suzanne Schulte, 1 leidi Knapp, Kellam Comer 



Kappa Delta Rho Row L lodd Gordon, Paul Klewans, Sean Koren, Matt Lebowitz Row 2: 
Mathhew Zvolenski, Brian Narusis, Steve Barham, Anthony Matos, Brian Robilotta Row 3: Roger Barnes, 
Michael Bonder, Chad Andersen, Joe Nardone, Andrew Butler, William Brown Row 4: Adam Paul, John 
DeVighl, Michael Allerd, Derek Longacre, Craig Moran, Kevin Gannon 



32.8 Greeks 



Zeta Tau Alpha 

and 

Kappa Delta Rho 



Sisterhood, service, 
scholarships and social 
opportunitiues are just a 
few of the reasons why 
Zeta Tau Alpha is so 
special. 

From preference night 
to initiation, ZTAs learn 
about the rituals and 
ideals that make the 
sorority stand out 
among other organiza- 
tions. The sisters of 
ZTA are in various 
activities around the 
campus. From the 
Dukettes, Student 
Ambassadors, Honor 
Council and more , 
every sister is involved 
in some sort of outside 
activity. ZTA sisters 
help their national 
philanthropy the Susan 
G. Coman Breast Cancer 
Foundation. Through- 
out the year, ZTA cleans 
their adopted highway 
at Reddish Knob and in 
the springtime, sisters 
come to assist at the 
Special Ohnipics. 



Socially there is never 
a dull moment. Sister 
dates, a Christmas Party 
and Parent's cocktail 
party are just a few of the 
events the sorority has 
had this year. Most of 
all, the White Violet 
Formal was a memorable 
event for every sister 
who attended. 

Aside from the social 
aspects, ZTA does stress 
scholarship as first and 
foremost, maintaining a 
higher grade point 
average than those who 
are not Greek. 

All of these accom- 
plishments have not 
gone unrecognized. This 
past year at the national 
ZTA convention, JMU's 
Gamma Kappa chapter 
was given the award for 
the second best chapter 
in the entire nation. 
Through all of these 
facts, everyone can 
understand why ZTA 
friendships and sister- 





hood last a lifetime. The 
ZTA closeness is all 
based on one of the 
precepts used to found 
the sorority many years 
ago — Love — the greatest 
of all things. 

"Honor before all 
Things" is the motto that 
every fnember of Kappa 
Delta Rho strives to live 
by. KDR was founded 
at Middlebury College, 
Vermont in 1926. They 
colonized at JMU in 
1989, and received their 
charter as the Lambda 
Beta chapter in February 
1991. Since then KDR 
has grown at JMU, and 
around the state. KDR is 
one of the fastest grow- 
ing fraternities in the 
nation. 

As a social fraternity, 
the brothers enjoy many 
activities like parties and 
formal. Their house is 
located off campus 
which lets them put a 
little more personality 



into their accomodations 
than the fraternities on 
the Row. 

KDR has taken a 
special interest in the 
National Forestry 
Service. They have also 
adopted a highway. 
Preservation of the 
environment is where 
most KDR fundraising 
profits go. 

KDR has plenty of 
activities exclusively for 
brothers. Activities such 
as camping trips and 
homecoming tailgates 
are some of the popular 
activities. 

KDR is one of JMU's 
smaller fraternities, and 
because of this its 
members are able to 
make lasting friends. 
Throughout the pledging 
process, and the years 
spent as as initiated 
members, KDRs are able 
to strengthen their 
chapter and their per- 
sonal friendships. 




Kappa Delta Rho brother, Joe 
Nardone captains the KDR boat 
across Newman lake. Every 
year, kegs were popular 
flotation devices on the Greek 
Week boats 



Board Games, such as Axis and 
Allies are popular pastimes at 
the KDR kitchen table. During 
parties and other times the 
guys could be found engaging 
in a wide range of games. 



Greeks 3^9 



A Lambda Chi Alpha brother 
dances in his boxers for the 
crowd. The fraternity was well 
knovNTi across campus for its 
wild and crazv antics and 
terrific parties. 



sfei. 





I 



li 






Kappa Sigma Matt Robertson, Pete Price, Matt Lentz, Matt Flannery, Steve Dovel, Frank Slevin, Chris Murphy, James Wood 
Row 2: Ben Tsuchitani, Chris Larson, Jason Kimrey, Nic Lancelotta, Dave Stock, John Anderson, Robert McMurtray, Eddie 
Benson Row 3: Berton Ashman, Bob Huff, Alec Bates, Cliff Stevens, Chris Spelbring, Andrew Crockett, Jeff Creekmore, Dave 
Crocker, Brian Jordan Row 4; Hunter Williams, Rob Cafes, Justin Rufo, John Kilpatrick, J.D. Waterman, Chris Lagow, Carl Beale 



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Lambdci Chi Alpha row l: Matt Rosner, Scott Smedley. Carmine DeFilippis, Chris Richards, Chad Hogston, Mark Katz, Kevin Bom, Ross Cascio Row 2: Brian 
McCray, Eric Klingel, Jav Sanford, Troy Duffield, David Caggiano, Elliot Jenkins, Brent Preacher, Matthew Duley, Greg Seider, Kevin Reeb, Bobby Phillips, Sloan Frey, 
Ashley Warren Row 3: Bill Watson, Charley Webb, Jim Hollanel, Elliot Witmer, Todd Cerino, Brian Rossmann, Glenn Boyer, Mike Scott, Bear, Scott Ackerman, Matt Sanne, 
Rich Kelley, Christian Erickson Row 4: Leonard Matthews, Greg Berr\', Mason Reed, Mark Anderson, Todd O'Hare, Jason Bazar. Bob Parisi, Nate Ward, Jason Bailev, 
Geoff Smith, Brian Maher, Shawn Crumlish, Da\id Wong, Steve Marknith Row 5: John Stamper, Craig Clark, Josh Fedalen, Adam Ault, Kevin Jones, Jack Allen, John 
Burke, Donnie Myers, Greg Jones, Greg Couart, Matt Gunter, Steve Maleksadeh, John Caggiano, Ben Thompson, Dan Shea, Shayne Berlo 



\ 



y < 






Lambda Chi brother Geoff 
Smith seems to be having 
problems keeping the beer in 
his mouth. Parties on the row 
gave students a chance to blow 
off steam after a stressful week. 



Kappa Sigma brothers enjoy a 
morning round of Apple Pie 
Shooters left over from the 
previous night's Around the 
World Party. Dull moments 
rarely occur in the houses. 





Kappa Sigma 
and 




Lambda Chi Alpha 



dakeup and other sludge 
over Kappa Sigma pledges as 
liey celebrate at their pre- 
litiation party. The last week 
if pledging is always full of 
un and surprises. 



Lambda Chi gangsters pay a 
visit to the AST house. 
Halloween and other theme 
parties gave Greeks the 
opportunity to dress up and go 
undercover. 



Kappa Sigma frater- 
nity is not just a college 
activity, it extends far 
beyond graduation. 
Brotherhood in Kappa 
Sigma is for life. The 
Lambda Sigma chapter 
has been at JMU since 
1976, and many of the 
original alumni still 
return each homecoming 
for the traditional band 
and pig roast held 
behind the house. 

The social schedule of 
this fraternity is filled 
with theme parties and 
brother events. 

Kappa Sigs are found 
in every major and just 
about every type of 
activity at JMU. The 
brotherhood offers room 
for individuality to its 
members. 



Lambda Chi Alpha is 
a fraternity based ona 
strong brotherhood and 
loyal friendships. The 
Phi Eta chapter was 
colonized at JMU in 
1982. Nationally, the 
fraternity was founded 
on November 2, 1909 at 
Boston University. The 
brothers of Lambda Chi 
are dedicated to excel- 
ling in social, athletic, 
and academic areas on 
campus. They have won 
championship sports 
three out of the last five 
years, and are the 
reigning IFC champs. 

The brothers are a 
diverse group, involved 
in several varsity sports 
including football, 
soccer, wrestling and 
diving. Other members 



are on the President's 
cabinet, SGA senators 
and members of the 
honor council. Along 
with their leadership 
skills on campus, the 
brothers also strive to 
help the community by 
donating food and 
money to the Mercy 
House. Senior Byron 
Kavanaugh explains 
"Lambda Chi is not just a 
set of letters on a 
sweatshirt... they come 
on hats and shot glasses 
too." 

Aside from the joking, 
Lamda Chi adds to the 
Greek community in 
many different aspects 
and they aim for excel- 
lence in everything they 
do. 



Greeks 3 3 I 



Pi Kappa Alphas enjoy a trip 
to Graceland after visiting Pika 
national headquarters. Trips to 
national headquarters often let 
friends take tune for 
sightseeing. 



A Pi Kappa Alpha brother 
awaits the inquiries of potential 
rushees at student activities 
night. Pi Kappa Alpha has 
participated in IFC rush since 
1991. 



ft-- 

vvw 




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Pi Kappa Alpha 

and 



Pi Kappa Phi 



k'^\\ 



The Pi Kappa Alpha 
fraternity was founded 
on March 1,1868 at the 
University of Virginia. 
Pikes are the second 
largest national frater- 
nity. The JMU chapter 
aims to uphold the four 
ideals upon which they 
were estabUshed: schol- 
arship, leadership, 
gentlemanly conduct, 
and athleticism. 

Pikes have become 
part of IFC after receiv- 
ing their national charter 
on February 16, 1991. 

Scholarship is an 
important aspect in 
membership. To be a 
Pike, one must maintain 
a 2.5 grade point aver- 
age. Attention to 
scholarship is the 
primary obligation to 
membership. 

The JMU Pikes are 



involved. Each brother 
must be a member in at 
least one other campus 
activity. Brothers have 
been active in everything 
from Student Ambassa- 
dors, Resident Advisors, 
SGA, ROTC, Honor 
Societies, WXJM, and 
many other things. 

Other brothers are 
members of varsity 
athletic teams. Those 
not on JMU teams 
always add to the talents 
of the intramural teams. 

Some of the most 
prominent Pikes include 
the likes of U.S. Senator 
Strom Thurmond, ABC 
broadcaster Ted Koppel 
and radio host, Ric Dees. 
Pikes are a successul and 
diverse group. JMU 
Pikes will aim to con- 
tinue this tradition of 
success. 



Founded on February 
12, 1977 by twenty 
young men, the Delta 
Tau chapter of Pi Kppa 
Phi has since initiated 
over 300 brothers. 

Pi Kappa Phi includes 
brothers who are not 
only leaders within their 
fraternity, but outside as 
well. Pi Kapp has 
brothers in the Honor 
Council, SGA, and IFC. 
They also received the 
fraternity award of 
excellence. 

Aside from academics, 
is their commitment and 
dedication to helping 
others. In 1977, Pi Kapp 
created their own 
philanthropy. People 
Understanding the 
Severely Handicapped 
(PUSH). This organiza- 
tion has three areas of 
focus: 



providing play environ- 
ments for handicapped 
children, developing 
educational programs 
about the disabled, and 
finally encouraging all Pi 
Kapps to volunteer time 
at any local facility 
created for the disabled. 
Every summer one 
member from the 
chapter participates in 
the Journey of Hope, the 
largest national 
fundraiser in the Greek 
community. Students 
bicycle cross-country, 
and get to know brothers 
from other schools. 

Beyond all of this is a 
brotherhood that keeps 
growing and growing. It 
is not something that 
canbe explained, but 
more something to be 
seen in action. 






45^1 



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■>7F •v. 



332 



Greeks 



Pi Kappa Alpha Mark Boucher,Trip Burton, Brad Gibbons, Matt Salinky, 
Rob Blewitt, Christian Markow, Chuck Livergood, Eric Strauss, Michael Gottleib, 
Michael Wiles, Tim Griles, Kyle Bartol Danny Gaines, Kevin Deringer, Todd 
Haldane, Scott Hudgins, J.J. Hannam, Jon Flannery, Eric Sherman, Doug Drake, 
Ed Wyatt, Sean Kesler Chuck Goodstein, Jim Goodloe, Chris Black, Jason 
Sterling, Sean Huyett, Randy Jefferson, Josh Black, Paul Tine, Bill Foote , John 
Warlick, Eric Rosenberg, Remaining names not available. 



Pi Kappa Phi Rowl; Allan Grimsley, Jeff Baunes, Tim Walsh, Randy 
Arrington, Sakib Kahn Row 2: Rick Vaughan, Rob Scharf, Lou Babilino, Joey 
DeLuca, Rob Patrick, Chris Just, Lawson Waring, Trov Welck, Time Walsh, Rich 
Ruzicka, Mike Volley, Lawrence Black Row 3: Jason Schwartz, Trad Hughes, 
Thomas Flaherty, Jordan Potter, Barry Montgomery, Joseph Jaap, Rich Whalen, 
Wayne Lomicky, Nick Curran, Rob Sutton, Timothy Mountcastle, Randall 
Belknap, Dan Scheel, Alex Leikus Row 4 Dan Koerner, Chris O'Connell, 
Michael Jenkins, Jerry Kenney, Doug Quick, Matthew Carr, Tom O'Keefe, Doug 
Cothker, Jeff Conly, Scott Tucker, Bill Wells, Russ Reeder, Matt Bondurant, Scott 
Nelson, Kris Whitehead, Peter Ciriello, Jason Clark, 





Pi Kappa Phi's camping trip 
gave the brothers and their 
friends a chance to relax for a 
weekend. Greek organizations 
tried to offer a variety of 
activities for their members. 



Getting the ball into your 
opponent's cup is the objective 
of the popular game, beer 
pong. A Pi Kappa Phi brother 
takes aim, and hopes for a 
successful shot. 



Greeks 



333 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon Row 1: Jim Lock, Will Feden, Kevin Madden, Mark 
Tropca, Rob Kugelman, John Delaney, David Southard, Keith Johnson Row 2: 
Andrew Monsour, Steve Camp, John Walz, Brian Morobito, Torey Vahedian, 
Dean Cowles, Steve Merther, Aluaro Varerza, Jesse Bryant Row 3: Charles 
Smith, Jay V'aughan, Graham Gutter, James Swope, Kevin Zippier, Trent Bowers, 
Keith Clearv, Brad Cole, Mark Lamparella, Chris Slonaker, Scott Forster, Andy 
Fox, Jolm Maloney 



Sigma Gamma Rho Tia Brown, Tara Hood, Tara Tinsley, Andrea Brown, 
Cutisha Cauthorne, Tracey Tynes, Desirea Moore, Ria Verede, Sheena Scott, 
Wanda Davis 






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SAE brothers take time away 
from the action of the party to 
pose together for a photo. 
Parties were a great time to 
hang out with old friends and 
make new friends. 

Dancing and singing in 
costume, Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
brothers make the crowds 
laugh. Wearing a dresses and 
pantyhose is a common comical 
act for fraternites. 

Sigma Gamma Rho gets 
together at a local restaurant to 
celebrate their homecoming 
step show victory. The women 
worked hard to win this annual 
competition. 




33^ 



Greeks 



sE brothers party on board 
t; bus going to Foxfield. Bus 
lies to social events often 
irned out to be as much fun as 
l.> e\ ent itself. 





Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
and ^^^^^^ 
Sigma Gamma Rho 



The first fraternity 
founded in the deep 
south is also part of 
JMU's Greek community. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
was founded at the 
University of Alabama 
on March 9, 1856. Since 
then it has grown into 
one of the largest and 
most presitigious frater- 
nities in the United 
States. 

Over the last year, one 
major thing has changed 
fro the men of SAE. 
They are no longer a 
colony. After several 
years of trial existence, 
SAE has received their 



national charter and 
become a true part of 
JMU's IFC. 

SAE continues its 
diverse brotherhood. 
Many of the brothers are 
involved with varsity 
sports such as baseball, 
soccer and football. 
Other brothers are 
members of ROTC and 
and other campus 
organizations. 

Diversity has been one 
of the keys to SAE's 
success. If each member 
has something different 
to offer, the group can 
only benefit and become 
stronger. 



Sigma Gamma Rho 
sorority was founded in 
1922 by seven school 
teachers. "Greater 
Service, greater progress" 
is the motto that Sigma 
Gamma Rho strives to 
follow. 

The JMU chapter has 
been was founded in 
1989, and formally 
chartered in 1990. 

Over the past few 
years the women have 
played an important role 
in different services 
such as the Dayton 
Learning Center and the 
Crisis Pregnancy Center. 



Greeks 333 




Sigma Kappa 

and 



Sigma Nu 



Sigma Kappa has been 
part of JMU's Greek 
community since 1959. 
The basis for the sorority 
can be found in its 
individuahty, sisterhood, 
philanthropy, scholar- 
ship, and leadership. 

Sisters can be found 
doing all types of things 
together. Sigma Kappa 
highlights include their 
Founder's Day Formal, 
parties, and sister 
activities. 

Marine Sea Coast 
Mission and aid for 
Alzheimer's disease are 
two of Sigma Kappa 'a 
main philanthropies. In 
addition to being active 
in all types of activities, 
the sisters have 



been able to consistenly 
maintain a very high 
grade point average. 

Involvement has lead 
to various leadership 
roles for Sigma Kappas 
in several different 
campus organizations. 

Sisterhood means 
more than just hanging 
out together, it means 
being there for each 
sister. Through their 
years at JMU Sigma 
Kappas have made 
lasting friendships and 
memories. 

Sigma Nu is proud of 
the many things it has 
accomplished on the 
campus and around the 
Harrisonburg commu- 
nity. Each 



year, Sigma Nu sponsors 
the charity event. The 
Longest Yard, a bike ride 
from Lexington to JMU. 
The event raises money 
for Special Olympics. 
This year Sigma Nu also 
sponsored Hoops for 
Life, a basketball mara- 
thon to raise money for 
MS. 

Sigma Nu has excelled 
at JMU for nearly two 
decades in everything 
from housing to athletics. 
Brothers and guests can 
expect a full social 
calendar with theme 
parties, happy hours and 
semi-formals. 

At Sigma Nu there are 
always good times and 
strong brotherhood. 



Each year, formal gives Sigmi lo! 
Kappa sisters an opportunity ^ 
wear a special dress and danc i»t 
the night away at a ritzy hote (ji: 
Sisters and their dates all loo 
their best tliat night. U 





Sigma Kappa Msters use diver's 
fins to speed their boat across 
Newman Lake. Everything 
from styrofoam to milk cartons 
were used a flotation aids in 
this race. 



Dressed m blue tor their 
rendition of 60's hit Blue Moo| 
the brothers of Sigma Nu 
perform at Anchor Splash. 
Well known oldies were somi| 
of the favorites. 



336 



Greeks 



' Lot is one of the hippeest 
laces to tailgate on homecom- 
ig weekend. A group of 
igma Kappas are dressed up 
jr the traditional pre-game 
;stivities. 





Sigma Kappa Row l :Cynthia Sizemore, Jennifer Shakesby, Laura Meadows, Beth Vogelstein, Anne Chipparone, Michelle Deck, Nicole Chafitz, AUison Brown, Katrine 
Weiss, Jennifer Moniz, Karen O'Sullivan Row 2: Kerry McFarland, Anya Pardue, Karen Jones, Tracy Goebel, Stephanie Griffin, Shannon Gross, Beth Sunderland, Allison 
Kennedy, Gary Reynolds, Stephanie Collier, Kathryn Slonaker, Michele Davide, Dearme Stolte, Hollie Vona, Becki Shuford, Corey Maddox Row 3: Monica Felkdman, Michelle 
Ruark, Cynthis Runnells, Noreen Buckly, Eileen Jaffe, Carly Scarsella, Marie Dorsey, Amy Obeck, CUeen Muldoon, Beth Payne, Jody Stock, Jessica Manning, Rebecca Williams, 
Heidi Kutsch, Karen Hope, Alex Dawson, Jenni Goetschius Row 4: Marie Gravelle, Teresa Phillips, Britt Johnson, Kerri Rudin, Julie Staska, Robynne McMillan, Diana 
Nicholson, AmyHawkins, Kristin Dietel, Deborah Denham, Steffany Davis, Tara Wood, AlUscm I^rothers, Karyn Scoville, Wendi Jackson, Christina Jung, Bridges Radick, Sara 
Ringdahl, Kim Kittrell Row 5: Odessa Holt, Catherine Sheehan, Tyler Eagle, Annie Guardacasta, Dara Pouchet, Trisha Smith, Jenny Nickles, Casey Nutschele, Therese 
Thiltgen, Jenna Peterson, Sandie Metzger, Jennifer McCracken, Lara Derby, Meredith Adams, Kara Livolsi, Keri Lewis, Cassidy Smith, Emily Groome, Tanya High, Jen Woods 




Sigma Nu Row 1: Patrick McClelland, Brad Pennington, Michael Behan, Denny Basham, Matthew Miller, Douglas Weiler, Robert 
Singer, Clay Robblee, Victor Gonzalez Row 2: Christopher Pack, Michael Jakaitis, Ken Horisaka, Cory Birch, Rob Lorkiewicz, 
Duane Arruti, Matt Shaker, Douglas Campbell, Michael Donavan, Marcus Shaker Row 3: Chuck Fox, Jim Norton, Aaron 
Lineberger, Hunter Shriner, Wells Engledow, Matt O'Brien, Randy Corbin, Bob O'Malley, Sasha Townsend 




Halloween gave Tri-Sig sisters 
a time and place to dress up as 
the Dallas Cowboy Cheerlead- 
ers. Often bunches of friends 
would dress up alike, and go as 
a well-known group. 



Michael Siewers and Scottt 
Lanouette lean on each other 
during a Sigma Pi party. It was 
not unusual for Sigma Pi to 
have two or three parties each 
week. 




t 



J 




Niki Armstrong, Jen Cheavens, 
and Rosita Jain are decked out 
in their 50's attire. Theme 
parties that recreated periods in 
time were often seen at row 
parties 



Members of Sigma Pi fraternit) 
pal around in the basement of 
their house. The members 
Sigma Pi inhabited one of the 
newer and larger houses on 
Greek row. 



Sigma Pi Row 1: David Maside, Brian Harris, Dan Goldstein, Spencer Morgan, 
B.j. Karam, Mike Waite, Van Clayton Row 2 Hill Mallory, Hassan Jones, Patrick 
Keith, Robert BiDak, James Edminds, Rerun, Eerik Larsen, Bubba, Kevin Johnson, 
David Hinkel, Louis Farano, Timmy Heath, Steven Sampson Row 3; Matt 
Charleston, Skippy McGilUcutty, PhiUp McCrakin, Michael Policicchio, Michael 
Siewers, Jason Fricker, Buddy Gadams, John Atkinson, Herbie Copenhaver, Eric 
Neufeld, Kevin Murphy, Scott Surovell, David Wilson, D.R. Wells Row 4: Scott 
Lanouette, Christopher Cheston, Michael Pfautz, Mathhew Young, Bryan 
Kempton, Jay Cox, Michael Christie, Brian Burke, Kevin Tucker, Damon Wright, 
John Kenny, Bill Armstrong, Michael Reeb, Timothy Morahan 



Sigma Sigma Sigma Row l: Christina Wise, Missy Converse, Lee Frost, Gravrielle Josel, Sophia 
Dobbs, Karen Held, Myra Maclidong, Liz Rhvnerson, Christi Hoffler, Heidi Welty, Lv Finney. Regina 
Oelnch, Paige Held, Amnda Miller, Trina Goldberger, Tammia Butler, Trish Marra Row 2; Came 
Kirchberg, Kelley Murray, Karen Gardner, Lellyett Wentworth, Heather Glynn, Megan Bigamer, Grisella 
Martinez, Jenny Jallo, Jen Cheanens, Stacie Funk, Jenny Slevin, Ursula Chavez, Carrie Healh, Tammy 
Christman, Kerr)<' Holland, Catherine Mattingly, LesHe Thompson, Jill Alexander, Tamara Kelsey, Amy 
Spencer, Chnstine Lally, Katre Erickson Row 3; Blythr Britton, Sara Cordeiro, Rosita Jain, Karen Hoke, 
Mimi Alhassan, Ellen Mahle, Mona Pascual, Meredith Fischer, Stephanie Rayfield, Sheri Davis, Kate 
Hennessey, Brandi Hudson, Jenny Mosca, Lisa Cox, Julie Bragg, Julia Tock, Marianne Bell, Bessie 
Gottdiener, Stepahnie Ward, Jeanine Ir\'ing, Michelle Laton, Laura Brittingham, Natalie Moore Row 4: 
Janet Bauer, MeUssa Dodson, Kristen Policicchio, Carrie Norris, Jill Versen, Katie Walsh, Tara West, 
Bethany Krick, Anna Morford, Nicole Armstrong, Rebecca Haile, Holly Barradough. Jeannie Robeson, 
Elizabeth Mandable, Jenn Sternberg, Windsor Bamett, Leslie Riddel, Suzie Marlett, Sandy Reese, Michelle 
Bean, Catherine Harris, Melanie Keller 



W 




Sigma Sigma Sigma 



Sigma Pi fraternity is 
made up of a group of 
diverse men all working 
towards the same goals. 

Aside from the social 
aspect of the fraternity, 
the members also pursue 
goals of service, educa- 
tion and brotherhood. 

Each year the brothers 
dedicate time and effort 
to charitable causes. The 
brothers raise money for 
the Patsy Graham 
Memorial Scholarship 
Fund which was created 
to honor a Sigma Pi Little 
Sister who died of 
leukemia. The members 
also use their energy to 
aid in the preservation of 
George Washington 
National Forest. In 
addition, Sigma Pi also 
helps out by raising 



Way. 

To advance intellec- 
tual interests, Sigma Pi 
regularly holds study 
halls. Brothers can often 
be found working 
together on projects and 
studying for tests in the 
house and library. 

All the activities that 
Sigma Pi takes part in 
foster brotherhood — the 
ultimate aim of the 
organization. 

Sigma Pi has a strong 
brotherhood because of 
its diversity. Although 
each member has his 
own interests and beliefs, 
all the members share a 
common bond in the 
fraternity. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma 
believes its strongest 
quality lies in the diver- 



sity of its members. The 
members share a special 
bond of sisterhood that is 
created from the differ- 
ent activities, personali- 
ties, and backgrounds of 
the sisters. Each member 
offers a distinct quality 
that adds to the lifelong 
friendships that one 
makes in Tri-Sig. 

Members of Tri-Sig 
can be found all over 
campus, in many differ- 
ent activities. Sisters are 
involved with the 
student ambassadors, 
WXJM, UPB, the T.V. 
station, Madisonians, 
and many more. Tri-Sigs 
have assumed leadership 
roles around campus. 
This year the senior class 
president is a Tri-Sig, as 
is the President of the 



Anthropology Society. 

JMU athletes also 
make up a part of the 
sorority. Tri-Sigs partici- 
pate on the tennis, 
gymnastics, and fencing 
teams. 

Academics are an- 
other important part of 
Tri-Sig. This past year, 
Tri-Sig ranked first, with 
the highest grade point 
average on the row. 

Tri-Sig's motto is "to 
give much, is to receive 
much." Living by this 
motto, Tri-Sig partici- 
pates in blood drives, 
charity events, and 
fundraisers. 

Socially, Tri-Sig 
engages in parties, 
retreats, yogurt nights, 
roller skating, and much 
more. 



Greeks j^^ 




i\ 



Sigma Phi Epsilon Row 1 : Clvirlio Jdiie^, K.mdy Stono, D.nid Goodman, 
Robert Baldwin, Frankie Stanek, James Thompkins, Robert Cummings, John 
Clanton, Christian Sowers, Steve Boswell, Marc Katabia n Row 2: Mike Rozman, 
Divi Harris, Trip Morano, John Doe, Hunter ColHer, Richard Brewer, Dar Rafii, 
Seth Weinberg, Dave Goldstein, Jonathan Jones, Steve McCanny, John 
McGuinness, Mike Morris Row 3: Paul Rooney, Hank, Chris Maltese, Dusty 
Elliot, Jeff Hao, Zach Elliot, Matt Krop, Jeff Hicks, Brian Belforte, Barrey Gill, 
Keith Evans, Scott Agee, Ehren McElfresh 



Sigma Chi : Gerald Marino, Wang Redburn, Adam Rand, Jim Muscar, Thomas 
Rametta, Adam Torman, Chris Viselli, Jay Burnett, Andy Sydnor, Gregory 
Facchiano, Jack Hammer Row 2: Daniel Lapus, Scott Mueller, Craig Steger, Kirk 
Hazelgrove, Kevin Stewart, Gabe Sciallis, John Zippe, Mike Rogers, Eric 
Running, Adam Hunt, Jerry Wimer, T.J. Kenah, Christopher Inzerillo, Kip Kelly 
Row 3: Thomas May, Matt Hodges, Gregory Rollins, Michael Duszak, Mark 
Toughguy, Stacy Horton, Steve Kosciolek, Steve Williams, Thomas Fatouros, 
Milton Cook, Dave Ford, Michael Lawson, Nick Frank 




Sigma Phi Epsilon 

'and 




Sigma Chi | 



Sigma Phi Epsilon is 
presently one of the 
nations leading fraterni- 
ties, with 265 chapters 
and over 16,000 mem- 
bers. Their members are 
involved in many 
activities across the 
campus. 

SPEs can be found on 
the wrestling, soccer, and 
swimming teams. 

Other SPEs can be 
found giving a helping 
hand around the com- 
munity. Brothers 
participate in Adopt-a- 
Grandfather and Special 
Olympics programs. 
SPE has one philan- 
thropy that they pay 
special attention to. 
Camp Fund helps 
teenage boys get a good, 
balanced start on life. 
The fraternity is also 
involved with a program 



called "The Balanced 
Man". This program 
educates the fraternity 
members in all areas of 
college life. 

SPE has many parties, 
brother dates, formal 
and visits to Reddish 
Knob. Sigma Phi 
Epsilon's popularity is 
evident because they 
always have a large rush. 

Sigma Chi fraternity 
was founded in 1855. 
The Iota Beta Chapter 
was chartered at JMU in 
1 987. Sigma Chi is one 
of the few off-campus 
fraternities that main- 
tains their IFC recogni- 
tion. They are very 
active in the Greek 
community and in the 
IFC. Athletic events and 
a strong social program 
are important to Sigma 
Chi. They are very 



competetive in the 
Intramural Champion- 
ship Sports Division. 

On the social side, 
Sigma Chi hosts parties 
such as outdoor cook- 
outs on their volleyball 
court, the 4 to 4 party 
with Chi Phi, and the 
annual Harley-Marley. 
This year, Sigma Chi 
achieved overall 
Anchorsplash victory. 

Community service is 
a big part of Sigma Chi 
as well. They participate 
in the American Heart 
Association, March of 
Dimes, Big Brothers of 
Harrisonburg, and local 
public radio. 

The Sigma Chi 
fraternity provides 
lasting friendships and a 
strong brotherhood to all 
of its members. 



Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity 
brothers form a human 
pyramid. No matter what they 
were doing , the brothers 
enjoyed spending time 
together. 



Members of Sigma Chi 
fraternity attempt to keep 
themselves dry during the 
rainy Foxfield races. Even 
inclement weather did not 
discourage attendance. 



the 



3^0 



Greeks 



PS^4Mk«w£lWK ^Mftw -^ 




Sigma Chi brothers gather at 
the house for their annual 
Derby Days portrait. Sigma 
Chi all across the nation hold 
Derby Days, the fraternities 
fundraiser. 



Sigma Phi Epsilon brothers 
return from a day of sailing on 
the Chesapeake. Road trips 
were one way to escape 
academic stress, and spend 
time with friends. 







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Omega Psi Phi 



Chi Phi fraternity 
received its charter at 
JMUinl987. Since then, 
Chi Phi has become an 
important and valued 
part of the Greek com- 
munity. Chi Phi stresses 
involvement and leader- 
ship. Many university 
leaders are also brothers 
of Chi Phi. Members can 
be found in Order of 
Omega and IPC. 

Athletics and academ- 
ics are also points of 
importance to the 
fraternity. They pride 
themselves on having 
one of the highest grade 
point averages among 
fraternities. Chi Phi is 
also competetive in the 
Championship Sports 



Division. 

A strong social 
program is also part of 
the fraternity. Parties 
such as Fountain of 
Youth, Headbangers 
Ball, and Four to Four 
provide many good 
times for the brothers. 
Community involvement 
is important to Chi Phi as 
well. The work of Chi 
Phi can be seen in 
donations to the Mercy 
House. 

Most importantly, 
strong, lasting friend- 
ships are established 
within Chi Phi, and 
brotherhood lasts a 
lifetime. 

Omega Psi Phi 
fraternity was 



established in 1911 at 
Howard University to 
foster lifelong bonds of 
brotherhood and to 
demonstrate manhood in 
affirmative social interac- 
tion. 

Omega Psi Phi is a 
national service frater- 
nity that promotes 
principles of manhood, 
scholarship, and 
perserverance, with a 
special emphasis on 
scholarly achievement. 
The fraternity requires a 
grade point average of 
2.5. 

The Beta Delta Chap- 
ter was founded at JMU 
in 1985 to serve the 
surrounding community 
thorugh social action. 




Omega Psi Phi brothers pack 
the car after a road trip. Getting 
away together allowed brothers 
to spend quality time with each 
other. 




Chi Phi little sisters gather in 
the foyer of the house. The 
brothers often planned fun 
activities for their little sisters. 
The girls were considered to be 
special guests of the fraternity. 



Homecoming weekend brings 
JMU President, Dr. Carrier, to 
the Chi Phi House. Dr. Carrier 
could be seen around campus, 
often sharing a friendly drink 
with students. 



342 



Greeks 



1^ 

n 



iROTHERHOOD. Members of 
3mega Psi Phi join for an 
)ufdoor gathering. Brothers 
taved in touch over the 
ummer in order to maintain 
he strength oi their brother- 
lood. 





Chi Phi Row 1: Rob Hopewell, Mike Erhart, Jake Peebeles, David Hummel, Robert Thome, Cecil Cadwallader, Matt 
Solomon, Aaron Kahlow, Brian Looney Row 2: Phil Kim, Bernie Dombrowski, Michael Douglas, David Delborello, 
Chris Ernst, Mike Coffee, Vijay Mago, Kevin Viers, Matt Johnson, Bill Tilman Row 3: Jay Wycoff, John Fenrich, Pim 
Jager, Chris Darius, Chad Ernst, Steve Grocki, Greg Pappanastos, Rob Chandler, Bill Smullen, Steve Raymond, Charlie 
Happel, Glen Heschler Row 4: Tom Economou, John Guarino, Jeff Todd, Pepi Linn, Will Mandis, Rob Carter, Rob 
DiTullio, Pat Grace, Steve Sligh, Mike Hess, John Fahey, Blake Allison, Dondi Simon 




Omega Psi Phi Row 1: Christopher Powell, William Coates Row 2: Bryan Cox, Anthony Jones, Daegal Richmond, Anthony 
Perdue 




.v 



J 









Inter fraternity Council 

and^ 
Panhellenic 




The Inter Fraternity 
Council is the organiza- 
tion to which all nation- 
ally recognized fraterni- 
ties belong to. It is the 
governing body above 
all fraternities. 

The IFC has a great 
deal of responsibility 
when it comes to the 
regulation of Greek life 
at JMU. Some of the 
serious concerns facing 
the IFC include hazing, 
underage drinking, and 
insurance policies for the 
organizations. Part of 
IFC membership in- 
cludes creating and 
enforcing rules which 
make a safer party 
atmosphere at JMU. 

Aside from IFC 
responsibilitites and 
duties, the organization 
also helps in planning 
many of the fun activities 
that Greeks participate 
in. 



IFC organizes intramural 
tournaments, works on 
planning Greek Week, 
and plans other special 
events for the Greek 
community. 

IFC often sponsors 
service projects for all 
Greeks. Activities for the 
entire system help make 
the differnt organizations 
more united. IFC acts as 
a unifying bond for all 
the fraternities at JMU. 

Who is responsible for 
governing and coordi- 
nating the eight social 
sororities on the JMU 
campus? It is the 
Panhellenic Council, 
which is made up of two 
members from each 
sorority. One represen- 
tative acts on the execu- 
tive board, while the 
other serves as a junior 
representative. The 
junior position eventu- 
ally leads to an 



executive position after a 
year of training and 
observation. 

Panhellenic is respon- 
sible for running rush. 
This year, bid celebration 
was conducted differ- 
ently, and was so suc- 
cessful, that the change 
will be permanent. Rush 
has become so popular 
that most sororities took 
more than fifty new 
pledges. 

Panhellenic has 
worked with campus 
organizations and done 
community service. 
Each semester, 
Panhellenic sponsors a 
blood drive. In addition, 
Panhellenic brings 
speakers to campus to 
cover topics like AIDS 
and sexism. 

Panhellenic aims to 
uphold high standards 
and ethical conduct 
among all Greeks. 




Sigma Chi, Steve Williams 
anchors the Greek Week tug-o- 
war contest. IFC and 
Panhellenic jointly sponsored 
this all-Greek Event. 



3^^ Greeks 





\SA Sara White cheers for her 
ororitv during the boat races, 
although the greek compete 
iuring the week, most of the 
ime spent is social and 
riendly. 



Ange Gulino and Katrine Weiss 
m onitor the Panhellenic table 
at Student Activities night. 
This night helped new students 
learn about JMU's Greek 
opportunities. 




IFC: Kevin Murphy, Rich Whelan, Charley Jones, Rodney 
Atienza, Bryan Feyock, Elliott Witmer. 






Panhellenic Row 1 : Jodi Mirmelstein, Ange Gulino, Katrine 
Weiss Row 2: Kim Roehrig, Isabela Reis, Karin Eyrich 




Kappa Alpha Psi 



Black Greek Caucas 



Kappa Alpha Psi 
Fraternity was founded 
on the campus of 
Indiana University on 
January 5, 1911 by ten 
young African-Ameri- 
cans, and has grown in 
membership to 90,000. 
The Nu Lambda Chap- 
ter of Kappa Alpha Psi 
at James Madison 
University was officially 
chartered on October 15, 
1988. 

Members participate 
in a number of service 
projects during the year, 
such as a clothing drive 
for John Wesley United 
Methodist Church, an 
annual Thanksgiving 
Food Drive and a Toys 
for Tots drive at Christ- 
mas. 

Community activities 
include involvement in 
the Guide Right pro- 



gram, in which brothers 
interact with a group of 
youngsters in the 
community on a regular 
basis, taking them to 
various JMU sporting 
events or movies, while 
providing them with 
positive role models and 
encouraging them to 
continue their educa- 
tion. 

Kappa Alpha Psi also 
sponsors Kappa Week 
in April. The week-long 
celebration of their 
founding at JMU 
features educational and 
informative programs as 
well as fun-filled social 
activities. 

The Black Greek 
Caucus is a student-run 
organization composed 
of members from the 
eight traditionally Black 
Greek-lettered Organi- 



zations. 

The purpose of the 
Black Greek Caucus is to 
unite all the members of 
the Black Greek-lettered 
Organizations to reach 
common goals such as 
scholarship, leadership 
development, commu- 
nity service and most 
importantly a brother 
and sisterhood. 

Black Greek Caucus' 
main thrust is education. 
Each year, scholarships 
are given to incoming 
freshmen who strive for 
academic excellence. 

Although the eight 
organizations function 
separately, "in unity 
there is strength...", the 
Black Greek Caucus 
strives to collectively 
make a difference in the 
lives of others. 




Kappa Alpha Psi member 

George Koonce (far right) and 

other members of the jazz band 

"After Five," perform on the 

commons. KAV brothers 

participated in numerous groups 

and activities. 



3 ^<5 Greeks 





One of the "playboys" of Kappa 
Alpha Psi, Stewart Canady, 
performs at the Homecoming 
Block Show. Red and White 
were the colors of KAV. 




Kappa Alpha Psi: John Mitchell(Pobnarch), Roddy Williams(Treas.), 
Anthony Archer, Brian Smith, Richard Peebles, Vaughan Jones, 
Clayton Slappey(Vice-Polmarch), Stewart Canady, George Koonce, 
David Jet (Keeper of Records), Craig Lascne (Grad Student). 




The beginning of the Homecom- 
ing Block Show is announced. 
Black Greek Caucus helped 
organize the event, which 
featured a steppe competition 
between the black greek-lettered 
organizations. 



Kappa Alpha Psi member, 
Richard Peebles, concentrates 
on his stepping during the 
block show. Kappa Alpha Psi 
was known for their use of 
canes during their perfor- 
mances. 



Greeks J7 t- / 



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BLUESTONE 




The Bluestone photography staff was 
faced with the challenge of depicting all the 
events of the year that had an impact on student 
lives. Each photographer had the task of being 
the eyes behind the campus life. Often, these 
photographers were forced to go behind the 
scenes and watch the action rather than partici- 
pate. 

Each of the photographers lent her or his 
own original points of view to each subject that 
was covered. Different camera angles changed 
the perspective of students. A football game was 
more than just shots of throwing and catching; 
separate photographers captured the moment 
through their own interpretations of what as- 
pects were important. The game could be repre- 
sented through pictures of the fans, cheerlead- 
ers, coaches, and players. 

The gallery is a Bluestone tradition which 
gives the photographers an opportunity to dis- 
play their favorite shots, pictures which reflect 
their personality and creativity rather than the 
structured assignments they covered through- 
out the year. 



GALLERY 



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1 

In Memoriam 




Rober Curtice 



Jonathan Gyapong 



Lisa Hass 



Margo Sylvester 



In Memoriam 367" 



DIAMOND 




Each year, the Bluestone rehes on the donations of many parents 
and individuals in order to successfully continue to provide a 
historical record of James Madison University. These donations 
vary in amount, but on the following pages we would like to 
recognize all of our patrons. We thank them for their continued 
support and hope that they are satisfied with our efforts. Thank you. 



Dr. & Mrs. John E. Bilodeau 

Mrs. Judith Cole 

Henry L. & Theresa C. Ellison 

Douglas L. Ensley 

Michael & Chris Feldmann 

Kenneth & Judith Gottlieb 

Mr. & Mrs. Ganiel O. Gregory 

Nancy Kay Hakerem 

Michael D. Hart 



^C>Q Diamond Patrons 



PATRONS 



^ 



Kotaro Horisaka 
Michael & Jennie Julian 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Levering 
Mr. & Mrs. G. Robert Lyles 

Mr. & Mrs. S.E. Melton 

James & Kathleen O'Connor 

Terence R Quinn 

Lee & Nancy Sprissler 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Stockton 

Mr. & Mrs. J.V. Taylor 

Sara T. Tomasello 

Gerald R. & Rosalee Wermus 



Diamond Patrons 3 ^ ^ 



Patrons 



Peter Abend roth 

Alex & Nancy Aitken 

Ihsan & Latifeh Alam 

Bobby Aldridge 

G. Alessandria 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Allenby 

Kermit Almstedt 

Frank H. Anderson III 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Anderson Jr. 

Thurman D. Anderson 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas C. Andrews 

Jeff & Sandy Anthony 

Mr. & Mrs. Garrett Astaruta 

Jon H. & Pamela P. Baake 

Mr. & Mrs. John M. Baldwin 

Mr. & Mrs A. J. Balkey, Jr. 

Helen M. Ballentine 

Albert Barnes 

Peter A. Barnett 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas K. Barrett 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles T. Bassler 

Tom & Ann Barton 

William R. Bauer 

William J. Beane 

Bill & Barbara Benson 

Donna & Larry Berger 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Billak 

Norman & Inez Bing 

Bob & Peggy Black 

Michael E. & Kim B. Black 

Mr. & Mrs. Neil Blass 

Mr. & Mrs R. H. Blewitt, Jr. 

Ceceha Blalock 

Joel & Kerry Blum 

Al & Joan Bonney 

J.T. Bostaph 

Jack & Wilma Braun 

Harry & Jo Ann Breitbach 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Brennan 

Bonnie & Richard Brewer 

Rev. & Mrs. Wm. Edwin 

Brockett 

Mr. & Mrs. Amos L. Brown 

Dr. & Mrs Richard H. Bucher 

Mr. & Mrs. John H. Bulheller 

Charles & Linda Burch 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert M. Burger 

Daniel L. & Helena A. Burns 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth R. Burns 

Mary T. Burtnette 

Herbert S. Butts 

Mr.& Mrs. George Byrd 

Dan & Cathy Callahan 

James J. & Tobi K. Cannelli 



3yO Patrons 



Donna Cardinal! 

Mr. & Mrs. M. Douglas Carlson 

Bruce M. Games 

Paul & Judy Carpenter 

Roger Castiglione 

H. Gordon Cheney 

Bob & Sandy Chaplow 

Ellie Thayer & Jack Chapman 

Dennis A. Cherry 

Delores Chewning 

John & Sally Christensen 

Dr. & Mrs. A. P. Ciarlo 

Gary & Carole Click 

William & P. E. Coe 

Williston B. Gofer, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Colahan 

Pamela J. Colbert 

George & Justine Coleman 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Colley 

Lawrence Collins 

Richard W. Collier 

Vilma E. Colon 

Jo Ann C. Colvin 

Patricia Concorda 

Paul F. Conroy Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Wallace P. Cooney 

Robert & Elizabeth Coughlin 

Chuck & Patti Crist 

Pete & Joette Creamer 

Tom & Jo- Ann Croci 

Karen & Richard Cueja 

Joe & Chris Daly 

Janet David 

Ms. Bernard E. Davis 

David M. & Kathleen J. Davis 

Mr. & Mrs. William R. Daniels 

Mr. & Mrs. W. Alan Day 

Edgardo Decarli 

Martin & Phyllis Decatur 

Frank & Pat DeFilippis 

W. DeFreitas 

Mr. & Mrs. William K. Denslow 

Marisa & Andres Domalko 

Richard & Noret Dovel 

Frank P. Donnini 

Harvey J. & Cheryll Drury 

Betty & Van Duley 

David Dutrow 

Linda & Joe Egan 

Michael & Judith Elliott 

Robert & Marilyn Emerson 

Jerel Eppard 

Samuel & Judith B. Espinoza 

Anne & John Ferranti 



Isabelita V. Filamor 

James M. & Patricia E. Flanagan 

John & Carolyn Fleming 

Mr. & Mrs. T. A. Folderaver 

Alan M. & Tina T. Franko 

Robert L. Franks 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry C. Frenck 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Frost 

James D. Frye 

Patricia A. Fulkoski 

David C. & Doris W. Funk 

Beth Fisher 

Dr. & Mrs. Kell W. Fleshood 

Dr. & Mrs. Mark J. Freihage 

Bruce R. Fye 

Darrell & Judy Gasaway 

Charles & Yolanda Gerard 

Atty & Bernard Gerber 

John Gilbert 

David Gindlesperger 

Bruce A. Giovanello 

Dr. & Mrs. Arthur Giroux 

Leslie & David Glickman 

George D. Golden 

Julian &Ann Goldberger 

Margaret & Edward Good 

Jean Gordick 

Jim & Paula Gordon 

Mr. & Mrs. Russell H. Gordon 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald P. Gorman 

Mr. & Mrs. Rodolfo Granados 

Mr. & Mrs. R.T. Griffin 

Gerald T. Gripper & Marilyn J. 

Rogers 

Nicholas & Loretta Grosz 

Michael J. Grow 

Melissa D. Grubbs 

Mr. & Mrs. William M. Gunter 

Pat & Dewnis Gryder 

Theodore Haas 

Mr. & Mrs. James E. Hales 

Bob & Dena Hamblen 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael G. Hamp 

Trewitt D. Harding 

Mr. & Mrs. Chester W. Harrison 

Donna McGovern Hauer 

Cornelius & Margaret Hawk 

Col. & Mrs. E. E. Hawthorne 

Curt & Barbara Heinfelden 

Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Henretta 

Mr. & Mrs. John Heron 

Karen D. Hetzel 

William & June R. Hill, Jr. 

Virginia K. Hinds 



Gordon & Betty Anne Huey 

Mr. & Mrs. William P. Hunter 

David & Marcia Ingraham 

Alice Jackson 

Charles A. Jackson 

Mr. & Mrs. Ivan Jackson 

Steven & Kathleen Johnson 

Kenneth E. & Kathleen R. Jones 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Jones 

Sue Kallas 

William C. Kane 

Joann R. Kaplita 

Robert P. Kappler 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert P. Karsky 

Jack Kelley 

Kells 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard I. Kemptor 

Capt. & Mrs. W.E. Kenealy 

George Lee & Rita Faye Kern 

Ron & Jane Kern 

Ronald & Barbara Kerr 

Jim & Carol Kershasky 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald A. Knapp 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Kratochvil 

Karl A. Krietsch 

Neil Kuhnel 

Michael & Linda Kutsch 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Labik, Jr. 

Mr. Victor Labruna 

Dr. & Mrs. James Laidlan 

H.C. Lahey 

Peter J. Laine 

Brenda L. Lambert 

A.H. Lasseigne 

Mary & Larry Laubscher 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Lavorgna 

Chuck & Rose Marie Lawing 

Stuart & Mae Layne 

Irwin R. Legon 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael L. Leaman 

Edward J. & Mary M. Lee 

William A. Leese 

Judith Leet 

Teresa M. Leighton 

Dennis Leikus 

Bernard P. Lesky 

Mr. & Mrs. Bill Liappis 

Capt L. Truett & Sandra 

Lineberger 

Johannes and Priscilla Linn 

Mr. & Mrs. David Lockman 

Chris & Susan Lockwood 

George M. Londeree 
Miren & John Loveland 



\lr. 
Pk 
Mr. 

[tote 

Doi 

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U\ 

] 

Pal 



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ft.i 



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n 



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Patrons 




Mr. & Mrs. William T. 

Lorkiewicz 

Sandra & Robert Lozier 

Marta M. Lustig 

John Luviaino 

Mr. & Mrs. M. Lynch 

Philip G. McCarthy 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard E. 

McCormack 

Charles & Virginia McCusker 

Donald W. McDougall 

Kathryn G. McGrath 

Linda L. Mclntyre 

Sharon McQuillan 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. McSorley 

Marilu MacCarthy 

Pat & Don MacDonald 

Jerry W. Mabry 

Scott & Cathy Mack 

Jack D. Mahle, Jr. 

Paul & Niki Makris 

Mr. & Mrs. John M. Manzo 

Mr. & Mrs. Porter H. Mason, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas T. Max 

Paul Mazey 

Dave & Janice Meadows 

Henry R. Meditz 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter J. Meehan 

John & Pam Meeuwissen 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Merrill 

Marsha & John Metz 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Moetzinger 

Ralph Mondore 

Joseph Moore 

Dr. & Mrs. Charles C. Moore, Jr. 

Charles & Janine Moore 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard E. Moore 

Peter & Sarah Morford 

Mr. & Mrs. James E. Moye 

Frank & Judith Mueller 

Douglas & Jeanne Myers 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank W. Naylor, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest L. Nesselrodt 

B.N. Nicodemus 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen O'Connor 

Paul & Jean Ogg 

Janice & Michael O'Quinn 

Orville L. Overboe 

William Palmer 

Robert Panels 

Fred G. & Shirley L. Patterson 

Mr. & Mrs. C.C. Partin 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Passerini 

Hansa & Ramesh Patel 



Clint V. and Nancy Pazdersa 

Barbara P. Pearce 

Mr. & Mrs. H. Alvin Pearce 

Dr. & Mrs. W. Michael Peirson 

Dr. & Mrs. Michael J. Perkins 

J. Perrie 

Mr. & Mrs. William Persan 

Cdr. & Mrs. Timothy B. Persons 

Donald A. Philippi 

David & Carol Pickering 

Curtis W. Pickurel 

Steve & Suzanne Pineo 

Cheryl Plummer 

Donald M. Prem 

Lyle & Veronica Priddy 

Frank & Dorothy Proden 

Mr. & Mrs. William L. Putnam 

Jason Quarles 

Mr. & Mrws. Dennis Ragan 

(Parents of Christopher Hess) 

Merritt & JoAnne Railey 

W.A. Raines 

Eugene & Jessica Reckner 

Bertie Reed 

Judy R. Reilly 

William A. Reynolds 

Frank & Diana Rich 

Tom and Pam Robbens 

Barbara & Ronnie Roberson 

Patrica L. Robinson 

Mr. & Mrs. William B. Rogers 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael B. Rollston 

Emily & Mike Romano 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald F. Romich 

Eugene A. Rosier 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Rowe 

Timothy Ryan 

James E. Samuel 

Robert Sampson 

Walter B. Schauermann 

Steven Scher 

Mr. & Mrs. George R. Schiele 

The Schilken Family 

Craig & Holly Schaefer 

Mr. James R. Schmitz 

Anne V. Schneider 

Mr. & Mrs. R.J. Schulte 

Carol & John Schutta 

Dr. & Mrs. alien Schwartz 

Bill Sr. & Kay Scudder 

Christopher C. Seal 

Schwatka's Farm Services 

Mr. & Mrs. J.T. Sexton 

Mr. & Mrs. William L. Shaffer 



William & Joanna L Shaker 

Allen & Kathleen Shapiro 

Susana R. Shell 

Joel Sherman 

Lucy & Chuck Shorter 

Chris Shultis 

Mr. & Mrs. James Michael 

Shumate 

Lilian Simpson 

Mr. & Mrs. Jerome Sincavage 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Sisler 
Mr. & Mrs. Phillip R. Skipper 

Elisa & Joseph Slamm 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael A Smishs 

Mr. & Mrs. Mark C. Smith 

Jeff Smith 

Brian & Susan Smith 

Donald G. Spaid 

Linda J. Speakman 

Dr. & Mrs. Daniel Spensieri 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Springer 

Ralph & Peggy Starkey 

Mr. & Mrs. Kerry R. St. Clair 

John & Meriel Steines 

Gretchen C. Stephens 

Therese Munro Stewart 

Marie A Stone 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank D. Stone 

Radm & Mrs. Joseph C Strasser 

Linda J. Strayton 

Janice & Larry Stucki 

Charles A. Suit, Jr. 

Mr. &. Mrs. Lawerence T. 

Sullivan 

Carroll E. Swain 

Claude R. Swanson 

Mr. & Mrs. R. Sweet 

Mr. & Mrs. William Swenton 

Robert & Barbara Sydell 

Dr. & Mrs. David Syrek 

Mr. & Mrs. William F. Tapp 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Tareila 

Gwen Taylor, Parent of Gary 

Schockemoehl '96 

Philip & Diane Tennant 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Thomas 

Rick & Karen Thompson 

Mildred W. Tice 

Mr. & Mrs. James B. Tiernan 

Mr. & Mrs. Seldon T. Tompkins 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Towers 

Mr. & Mrs. T.N. Towry 

Douglas & Pat Trainum 

Jeanne M. Trott 



Joe & Alice Turner 

Mr. & Mrs. DeWayne Tuttill 

Robert O. Tyler 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry A. Ulrich, Jr. 

Jacquelyn F. Vassanelli 

Clydek. & Cecil Ann Venable 

Robert T. Vitter 

Barbara G. Vollmer 

Barbara & Glen Vought 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert M. Walty 

E. Lee Weaver 

Carl Webb 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Weiler 

Anita & Sonny Weiss 

Chaarles & Vickie Weitzenhofer 

Dale Welter 

Bill & Pat Wengert 

Donna J. Wieand 

Mr. Walter T. Wiley 

Greg Wilinski 

Carmen Bjork Wilke 

Richard E. & Judith A. WiUard 

James & Sharelyn Williams 

Douglas & Linda Wilson 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Winder 

James G. & Sue Winkler 

Douglas R. Wise 

Joe & Mary Lou Wollaston 

Dan & Cyndi Woods 

Leah M. Woodson 

Mr. & Mrs. H.R. Wrede 

Richard & Marsha Wulf 

Ken & Linda Yonek 

Richard Zellers 
John G. Zimmerman 
Stewart & Alice Zink 



Patrons 3 7 i 



AAAAA 



Abercrombie, James 


192 


Ackerman, Mary 


242, 322 


Ackerman, Scott 


330 


Ackison, Ben 


133 


Acors, Tiffany 


305 


Acosla, A. 


192 


Acree, William 


192 


Acri, Jim 


321 


Adams, Gillian 


192, 322 


Adams, Jessica 


145 


Adams, Laurel 


192 


Adams, Melissa 


153 


Adams, Meredith 


291, 337 


Adkins, Jason 


270, 288 


Adkisson, Stacy 


192 


Agee, Scott 


340 


Agee, Steve 


133 


Ahn, Jin 


254 


Ahn, Michelle 


270 


Ainsley, Sarah 


192, 305 


Aitken, Mindy 


134, 135, 242 


Akers, Michael 


192 


Al-Hassan, Mimi 


288 


Albert, Tanya 


192 


Albert, Wendy 


254 


Albertella, Dana 


141 


Albrecht, Brian 


136, 139 


Albrite, Diane 


192 


Albrite, Telly 


270 


Albriltton, Jody 


192 


Alcorn, Kathy 


68,96 


Aldridge, John 


192 


Aleski, Missi 


322 


Alexander, Geoff 


298 


Alexander, Jill 


339 


Alexander, Lori 


270 


Alford, Ann-Marie 


270 


Algeo, Mary Eileen 


170,172,173 


Alhassan, Mimi 


339 


Allen, Jack 


330 


Allen, John 


133 


Allen, Kari 


157 


Allen, Katrina 


120 


Allen, Michelle 


270 


Allen, Sarah 


78,240,277,312 


Alleyne, Vonya 


192 


Allison, Blake 


343 


Allison, Scott 


59, 270 


Allred, Michael 


242,328 


Allyn, Lauren 


324 


Almborg, Heather 


157 


Alston, Mitchelie 


192, 301 


Ames, Annalie 


327 


Amick, Christine 


154 


Amprey, Kimberley 


242 


Anastas, Zee 


154 


Andersen, Chad 


328 


Anderson, John 


242, 330 


Anderson, Kara 


192 


Anderson, Kevin 


117 


Anderson, Kristen 


242 


Anderson, Mark 


330 


Anderson, Melissa 


270, 327 


Anderson, Patricia 


254 


Anderson, Ryan 


129, 133 


Anderson, Travis 


192,298 


Andrews, Rebecca 


181,301 


Andros, Eric 


315 


Anglin, Tom 


270 


Angstadt, Peter 


192 


Anthony, Jen 


291 



INDEX 



Anthony, Pamela 
Apodaca, Albertu 
Aramayo, Victor 
Arastas, Zoe 
Archer, Katherine 
Ardinger, ]o 
Ardoin, Nicole 
Arena, Jude 
Armel, Brian 
Armendariz, Amelia 
Armentrout, Tracey 
Armstrong, Bill 
Armstrong, Jill 
Armstrong, Nicole 
Arnaldo, Eileen 
Arnett, Amy 
Arnett, Jamie 
Arnette, Samantha 
Arney, Michael 
Arnold, Deninne 
Arnold, DeVenchi 
Arobogast, Wendy 
Arra, Philip 
Arrington, Randy 
Arritt, Elizabeth 
Arruti, Duane 
Arthur, Heidi 
Arvold, Trina 
Ashby, Gary 
Ashley, Amanda 
Ashman, Berton 
Asiello, Laura 
Atienza, Rodney 
Atkins, Kara 
Atkinson, Jen 
Atkinson, John 
Auclair, Kristen 
Aukamp, Mark 
Ault, Adam 
Aument, Amy 
Austin, Mike 
Averette, Michelle 
Aversano, Matt 
Averv, John 
Awvakye, Barbara 



Baake, Kent 
Babcock, Whit 
Babilino, Lou 
Bachman, Sarah 
Badri, Ameer 
Baer, Josh 
Baggan, Michele 
Baggett, Mark 
Baier, Brett 
Bailey, Brian 
Bailey, Carol 
Bailey, Darcy 
Bailey, David 
Bailey, Jason 
Bailey, Karin 
Bailey, Leigh 
Bailey, Shannon 
Bak, James 
Baker, Caryn 
Baker, Chris 
Baker, Karen 
Baker, Kim 
Baker, Randi 
Baker, Sarah 
Bakshi, Uman 
Baldwin, Christine 



192, 313 


Baldwin, Megan 


193,322 


Beckner, Jill 


136 


Baldwin, Mike 


315 


Beebe, Michael 


242 


Baldwin, Robert 


340 


Beeghly, Paula 


294 


Baldwin, Sarah 


193 


Beggs, Stacy 


304 


Balint, Kristen 


181, 254 


Behan, Michael 


192 


Balkey, Daniel 


193 


Behrens, Shelly 


192,293 


Ball, Molly 


193 


Behrman, Danielle 


182, 183 


Ball, Stephen 


178, 193 


Bekhor, Stephanie 


270 


Ballantvne, Brooke 


193 


Beland, Matt 


134, 254 


Ballentine, Cynthia 


193 


Beland, Matthew 


328 


Ballou, Laura 


242, 327 


Beland, Steffani 


339 


Balsbaugh, Kimberly 


242 


Belcher, Monica 


311 


Bands, Robvn 


297 


Belcher, Patrick 


338, 339 


Bane, K. 


193,306,327 


Belforte, Brian 


157 


Bang, Jamie 


242 


Belknap, Randall 


242 


Bankins, Charles 


133 


Bell, Maha 


182 


Banks, Jennifer 


322 


Bell, Marianne 


270 


Barany, Matt 


178 


Bell, Stephanie 


298 


Barbour, Chad 


242, 291 


Bart Bellairs 


254 


Barbour, Leo 


324 


Bellamy, Joy 


133 


Barbour, Philip 


193 


Bellis, Joy 


270 


Barefoot, Kelly 


193, 295 


Belmont, Susan 


192 


Barger, Karen 


194, 195 


Bender, Dan 


333 


Barham, Steve 


328 


Benedict, Alex 


192,310 


Barile, Christine 


194, 195 


Benin, Matt 


337 


Barke, Kelly 


305 


Bennett, Brent 


303 


Barnak, Sean 


154 


Bennett, Katie 


294 


Barner, Antoinette 


270 


Bennett, Lisa 


192 


Barnes, Libby 


322 


Bensenhaver, Heidi 


242 


Barnes, Lisa 


194, 195, 324 


Benson, Eddie 


330 


Barnes, Roger 


328 


Benson, Jerry 


192 


Barnett, Amy 


194, 195 


Benson, Michele 


122 


Barnett, Catherine 


322 


Benson, Whitney 


193 


Barnett, Windsor 


339 


Benton, William 


322 


Barraclough, Holly 


254, 339 


Berg, Kirsten 


193,339 


Barret, Mary 


312 


Berge, Barbara 


193 


Barrow, Natanya 


288 


Berloa, Shayne 


242, 296 


Barrows, Keesha 


270 


Bernstein, Jonathan 


330 


Barry, Sarah 


324 


Berry, Greg 


193 


Barsnica, Lisa 


194, 195, 302, 304 


Berry, Jon-nell 


133 


Bartells, Becky 


194, 195 


Berte, Michelle 


193,324 


Bartlett, Matthew 


194, 195 


Bertholomey, Jason 


321 


Bartol, Kyle 


333 


Bess, Sheila 


296 


Barton, Daniel 


270 


Bessichio, Justin 


254 


Barton, Kathryn 


194, 195 


Betts, Heather 


■^ r^ 


Barton, Robert 


254 


Beucler, Michelle 


^ R 


Barton, Tom 


321 


Beury, Diane 


3 D 


Basham, Denny 


337 


Bianco, Michelle 




Bashani, Tonna 


194, 195 


Biederman, Lysa 


12,193,297,311 


Baskerville, Jamie 


194, 195, 291 


Bigamer, Megan 


117 


Bass, Wendy 


242 


Biggins, Timothy 


333 


Sassier, Stacey 


194, 195 


Bilcher, Gabrielle 


193 


Baston, Charles 


231 


Bilello, Dawn 


193 


Bates, Alec 


330 


Billak, Robert 


136 


Bates, Erica 


120,194,195,302,309 


B.ller, Sibyl 


327 


Bates, Jarvis 


194, 195 


Binbaum, J. 


242 


Batra, Ingrid 


194,195,294 


Bing, Jason 


254 


Battle, Toshia 


313 


Bingay, Kate 


136, 193 


Bauer, Janet 


339 


Bingham, Robert 


193 


Baumann, Kristen 


254 


Birch, Cory 


301 


Baumgander, Jill 


153 


Bird, Tammi 


133 


Baunes, Jeff 


333 


Birnbaum, Kim 


330 


Bautz, Karen 


194, 195 


Bishop, Lisa 


193 


Bazar, Jason 


194,195,288,290,330 


Bishop, Shannon 


242 


Bazarnick, Stephen 


254 


Bjork, Jon 


117,254,266,316 


Beale, Cari 


330 


Black, Chris 


193 


Bean, Carolyn 


242 


Black, Deb 


193 


Bean, Michelle 


339 


Black, Emily 


119,151 


Beard, Mary 


242 


Black, James 


193, 295, 296 


Beard, Stacy 


181,270 


. Black, Josh 


291,301 


Beares, Samantha 


254 


Black, Lawrence 


254 


Beasley, Holly 


270 


Blair, Bethany 


193,293 


Beasley, William 


254 


Blair, Carey 


255, 291 


Beck, Lisa 


194, 195 


Bland, Deirdre 


254 


Beckman, Kara 


254 


Blazie, Chris 



194 



194, 195, 294, 



6, 242, 256, 
290,301, 



194, 
270, 
194, 

136, 
194 

194, 195 

194 
194 

195, 

301, 

145, 

242, 
112, 



195, 



195 



53, 



32, 
195, 



228 
291 
195 
50 
337 
157 
254 
305 
305 
270 
324 
242 
315 
340 
333 
181 
339 
195 
165 
313 
328 
195 
182 
290 
178 
139 
322 
304 
195 
330 
284 
301 
270 
195 
195 
195 
330 
291 
330 
141 
327 
195 
195 
119 
270 
242 
299 
113 
195 
339 
270 
311 
311 
339 
299 
242 
178 
157 
195 
337 
195 
306 
291 
244 
195 
333 
327 
312 
195 
333 
333 
195 
391 
321 
242 



(;,ioi('>' 

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372. Index 



, B»!la 

I 



Blechner, Matt 
Blewitt, Rob 
Bloodworth, Glen 
Bloomer, Kelley 
Blose, Betsy 
Blosser, Lisa 
Blumentlial, Carrie 
Boal, Shannon 
Boatwright, James 
Bodeo, Tracy 
Boezer, Catherine 
Bograd, Nancy 
Bohland, Johnnie 
Bolander, Tracy 
Boles, Derek 
Boley, Tabitha 
Boling, Mary 
Bollar, R. 

BoUendorf, Jeanne 
Bond, Amy 
Bonder, Michael 
Bondurant, Matt 
Boneillo, Dave 
Booker, Michael 
Booth, Henry 
Boquiron, Rudolf 
Boquiron, Rudy 
Borden, Daniel 
Borders, Betsy 
liorn, Kevin 
luisher, Jason 
Boss, Todd 
Bosserman, Karen 
Bost, James 
Boswell, Steve 
Bottomleu, Richard 
Boucher, Mark 
Bowen, Aimee 
Bowers, Lauren 
Bowers, Trent 
Bowie, Kristie 
Bowler, Alonzo 

Bowles, Traci 

Bowles, Will 

Bowyer, Jeff 

Boyer, Glenn 

Boyle, Jay 

Boyle, Jude 

Boyle, Megan 

Boysworth, Marc 

Bozarycki, Tom 

Bracket, Ronee 

Bradbury, Katherine 

Bradham, Kim 

Bradley, David 

Bradley, Renee 

Bradshaw, Jody 

Bradshaw, Rebecca 

Bragg, Julia 

Branch, Amy 

Branch, Jennifer 

Brandt, Berkely 

Brandt, Emily 

Braz, Laura 

Breckenridge, Lolita 

Breeden, Heather 

Breen, Christina 

Breland, Erin 

Brennan, Cynthia 

Bresnahan, Jennifer 

Brewer, Lori 

Brewer, Richard 

Breza, Scott 

Brice, Elizabeth 

Brillhart, Aimee 
Bnnkworth, Susan 
Brinser, Kristin 
Brisson, Michelle 
Brisson, Michelle 
Brittain, Lara 
Brittnigham, Laura 
Britton, Barbara 
Britton, Blythr 
Brizendine, Mary 
Brock, Margaret 
Brogan, Crystal 
Brooker, Kristine 
Brookhart, Christine 



136 
333 
193, 195 
157 
173 
271 
141,254 
294 
195 
195 
255 
71 
315 
301 
178 
195 
291,328 
195, 301 
195 
255 
328 
333 
117 
242, 288 
133 
195, 296 
321 
195 
243 
136, 138, 330 
195 
298 
271 
271 
340 
243 
195, 333 
255 
195 
196, 334 
313 
133 
289 
58 
182 
330 
82 
133 
112 
315 
307 
328 
271 
327 
291 
255, 327 
243 
196 
243,291,301,339 
298 
306 
224 
255 
255 
196 
144, 145 
271 
196 
243 
196 
298 
340 
196 
322 
328 
112,291 
180, 181 
294 
196 
196,312 
339 
196 
339 
271 
255 
196 
196 
196 



Brooks, Karen 
Brooks, Sheila 
Broomall, Hugh 
Brosious, Brooke 
Brothers, Allison 
Brown, Adrienne 
Brown, Allison 
Brown, Amy 
Brown, Andrea 
Brown, Angela 
Brown, Avery 
Brown, Christopher 
Brown, Elvin 
Brown, Jennifer 
Brown, Jeremy 
Brown, Joel 
Brown, Kimberly 
Brown, Laura 
Brown, Melvin 
Brown, Natasha 
Brown, Nekea 
Brown, Nicole 
Brown, Rachelle 
Brown, Rachelle 
Brown, Shawn 
Brown, Shelby 
Brown, Tia 
Brown, Wendy 
Brown, William 
Browning, Anne 
Browning, Cathy 
Browning, John 
Browning, Nicholas 
Browning, Tammy 
Broyles, Tabitha 
Bruce, Jacquie 

Bruggermann, L. 

Brunson, Tevis 

Bruton, Shari 

Bryan, Leigha 

Bryant, Allison 

Bryant, Andrea 

Bryant, Desiree 

Bryant, Eric 

Bryant, Jesse 

Bucaria, Patti 

Bucaro, Mary 

Bucciero, David 

Bucher, Kevin 

Buckingham, Jeannie 

Buckley, Jennifer 

Buckly, Noreen 

Buckner, Mitch 

Budd, Jason 

Budney, Valerie 

Buersmeyer, Stephanie 

Bugenhagen, Amy 

Bulge, Jennifer 

Bullock, Jacqueline 

Bultema, Annette 

Bumgarner, Lee 

Bunkye Chi, English 

Bunting, David 

Buntua, Marie 

Bunvard, Rachel 

Buraker, Ken 

Buraker, Kent 

Burch, Harold 

Burch, Shell 

Burgess, Julie 

Burgess, Susan 

Burke, Angela 
Burke, Brian 
Burke, Dennis 
Burke, John 
Burke, Joy 
Burke, Kelly 
Burke, Meghan 
Burkhammer, Wendy 
Burkman, Jorie 
Burnett, Cheyrl 
Burnett, Jay 
Burnett, Scott 
Burnette, Alyssa 
Burney, Laura 
Burnfeld, Jennifer 
Burnop, Scott 
Burns, David 



196 
196 
117 
196 
337 
134,322 
243, 337 
196 
271,301,313,334 
313 
255 
196 
128, 133, 158, 196 
243 
196,311 
196 
196,296 
196, 243, 307 
196 
196 
196 
197, 295 
294, 301 
197 
324 
120, 197, 309 
243,301,334 
197 
328 
197 
322 
38 
38 
38 
197 
243 
197 
119 
197, 299 
328 
197 
243 
197 
133 
334 
154 
93 
13b 
255,316 
197 
197 
337 
296 
291 
134 
197 
197, 303 
304 
197 
181 
271,314 
199 
243 
197, 327 
255 
197, 294, 314 
314 
197 
304 
197 
197 
197 
339 
296 
330 
271 
197 
328 
255 
271 
298 
197,340 
197 
271 
299 
305 
289 
197 



Burns, Greg 
Burns, Jeff 
Burns, Julia 
Burns, Leslie 
Burr, Kelli 
Burrow, Brandy 
Burrow, Chris 
Burton, Jerry 
Burton, Trip 
Bury, Meghan 
Busselaire, Renee 
Butler, Aaron 
Butler, Andrew 
Butler, Derek 
Butler, Janice 
Butler, Jennifer 
Butler, Linda 
Butler, Lisa 
Butler, Tammia 
Butter, Jennifer 
Butts, Audrey 
Byerly, David 
Byers, Jeffrey 
Byrd, Akiba 
Byrd, Angela 
Byrd, Christopher 
Byrd, Melanie 



178 

228 

198 

243, 327 

310 

90 

90 

117,160 
333 
271 
149 
271 
328 
198 
198 
255 
243 
69 
339 
324 

198, 295 
133 
198 
133 
198 
198 
198 



ccccc 



Cadwallader, Cecil 
Caggiano, David 
Caggiano, John 
Caggiano, P.J. 
Caines, Jeffrey 
Calderon, Ana 
Caldwell, Clinton 
Caldwell, David 
Callahan, Kerry 
Callan, Christy 
Callowhill, Anissa 
Camp, Steve 
Campbel, William 
Campbell, Anne 
Campbell, Douglas 
Campbell, Larissa 
Campbell, Robin 
Campbell, Rosheen 
Campbell, Roy 
Campbell, Stacy 
Campo, Christina 
Canestrari, Aldo 
Canipe, Felicia 
Cannon, Amy 
Caplan, Jennifer 
Caplinger, Heather 
Capriotti, John 
Caracciolo, Claudine 
Carbary, Jennifer 
Carhonneau, Derek 
Carbonneau, Heather 
Carbonneau, Heather 
Garden, Susan 
Cardile, Kathleen 
Cardile, Kathy 
Cardinal!, Julie 
Cardine, Martina 
Carey, Jennifer 
Carey, Pat 
Carlin, Jason 
Carlson, Christine 
Carlson, Kate 
Carlson, Rebecca 
Carlton, Sherry 
Carney, Jodi 
Carpenter, Gwen 
Carpenter, Katherine 
Carpenter, Katherine 
Carpenter, Matthew 
Carpenter, Terry 
Carr, Carolyn 
Carr, Cheryl 
Carr, Matthew 
Carr, Michael 
Carrier, Ronald 
Carrigan, Megan 
Carriker, Jeff 



343 
330 
330 
133 
271 
327 
243 
178, 261 
271 
226, 328 
328 
334 
198 
198 
337 
308 
145 
112 
182 
327 
307 
133, 198 
198 
261 
324 
305 
182 
32, 33, 46, 198 
198 
96, 198 
96 
198 
198, 327 
198 
298 
186, 187 
198 
198 
133 
271 
68, 198 
324 
324 
33, 198, 299 
243, 291 
198, 296 
141 
271 
199 
26 
112 
141,255 
333 
243 
36, 38, 289 
328 
311 



Carriker, Jeffrey 
Carriker, Rebecca 

Carriker, Rebekah 

Carroll, Anne 

Carscallen, Marci 

Carter, Christine 

Carter, Karl 

Carter, Kent 

Carter, Marcus 

Carter, Margi 

Carter, Paul 

Carter, Rob 

Carter, Tuck 

Carter, Wendi 

Gary, J. 

Cascio, Ross 

Casey, Melissa 

Cash, Kerri 

Cash, Mindy 

Cash, Penny 

Cash, Teresa 

Cassada, Lewis 

Casserly, Kimberly 

Cassidy, Betsy 

Cassidy, Sid 

Gastello, Dr. 

Caterson, Katharine 

Gates, Rob 

Catlett, Todd 

Catrell, Kevin 

Catts, Leslie 

Cauthorne, Gutisha 

Cauthorne, Wanda 

Gavalca, Priscilla 

Cavaliere, Sam 

Cavaliere, Samuel 
Cavanaugh, Pat 
Caviness, Celestine 
Cecchini, Barbara 
Gekada, Cheryl 
Centofanti, Vince 
Gentofanti, Vincent 
Cerino, Todd 
Cerrtti, Charlotte 
Chadha, Raminder 
Ghafitz, Nicole 
Chambers, Jeff 
Chan, Ryan 
Chandler, Rob 
Chang, Christine 
Chang, Matthew 
Chaplow, Brian 
Chapman, Elaine 
Chapman, Jennifer 
Charity, Sherri 
Charleston, Matt 
Charleston, Matthew 
Chavez, S. 
Cheavens, Jen 
Cheek, Tonya 
Cheeks, Nicole 
Gheetham, Jim 
Cherry, Kelly 
Cherry, Lisa 
Gheston, Christopher 
Chewning, Lynette 
Chewning, Sharon 
Chickerman, Chris 
Childress, April 
Chilson, Belinda 
Chilson, Belinda 
Chin, Allen 
Chipparone, Anne 
Cho, Alanna 
Chrisnian, Pamela 
Christensen, Donna 
Christensen, Jarrel 
Christian, Jeannine 
Christie, Michael 
Christine, Chad 
Ghristman, Tammy 
Christopher, Ann 
Christy, Krista 
Christy, Krista 
Chroniger, Jim 
Ghu, Michael 
Ciarlo, Sandi 
Ciatti, Daniel 



199 
271 
324 
328 
199, 314 
199 
133 
79 
133, 199 
322 
163,165,167 
343 
243 
199,302,312,327 
199 
330 
243 
243 
58 
187 
199, 302, 327 
133 
255 
257 
178 
285 
199,290,299,328 
330 
271 
15 
199 
334 
299 
32, 199 
311 
199 
178, 179 
199 
199 
199 
33 
199 
330 
322 
243 
255,291,337 
162,165,167 
89 
343 
298 
182, 271 
255 
199, 293 
271 
199 
26, 339 
199 
199, 339 
338, 339 
199, 324 
243 
119 
82 
255 
339 
41, 199 
271 
321 
82, 271 
302 
199 
199, 293 
337 
327 
243 
243 
244 
243 
339 
117 
339 
200 
294 
200 
133 
298 
200 
200 



Index 373 



Cikotas, Jonas 
Cillay, Ian 
Cipolleri, Mark 
Ciriello, Peter 
Clair, Kenneth 
Clanton, John 
Clark, Barry 
Clark. Brian 
Clark, Craig 
Clark, Jason 
Clark, Jennifer 
Clark, Katherine 
Clark, Kevin 
Clark, Tricia 
Clarke, Christie 
Clarke, David 
Clarke, Jeniufer 
Clarke, John 
Clarke, Suzanne 
Clarkin, Jennifer 
Clausen, Lisa 
Claxton, Kathleen 
Clay, Ben 
Clayton, John 
Clayton, Tajuana 
Clayton, Van 
Cleary, Keith 
Clemmer, Karen 
Clevenger, Susan 
Clifford, Elizabeth 
Clingenpeel, Jim 
Coates, William 
Coats, Erin 
Cobbins, Carlecia 
Coccaro, Amy 
Cochran, Brian 
Cochron, Kimberly 
Coffee, Michael 
Coffindaffer, Nancy 
Coker, Seth 
Colavita, Jay 
Colbert, Heather 
Cole, Amanda 
Cole, Bradford 
Cole, Mandy 
Cole, Wendy 
Coleman, Aleeta 

Coleman, Courtney 
Coleman, Lashawn 
Coleman, Melissa 
Coles, Aileen 
Coles, Brad 
Colitti, Daniel 
CoUette, Claudine 
Collie, Megan 
Collier, Amy 
Collier, Casey 
Collier, Hunter 
Collier, Michelle 
Collier, Stephanie 
Collier, W. 
Collins, David 
CoUins, Holly 
Collins, Mark 
Collins, Tom 
Colvin, Kristin 
Comer, Kellam 
Concodor, Stephanie 
Conley, Michael 
Conly, Jeff 
Connelly, J. P. 
Conner, Jenna 
Conner, Valerie 
Conner, Windy 
Conners, Donald 
Connolly, Patrick 
Conrad, Drew 
Conrey, Carmen 
Conroy, Amy 
Conroy, Julie 
Contos, Julie 
Converse, Melissa 
Converse, Missy 
Cook, Lee 
Cook, Susan 
Cook, Tim 
Cooke, Tim 
Cooney, Marie 



127, 147, 200 
200 
200 
333 
200 
340 
270 
305 
20, 330 
333 
255 
157 
200 
255 
291 
136 
310 
200 
315 
120, 121 
200 
255 
313 
182 
200 
316, 339 
200, 334 
200 
200, 278, 298, 299 
322 
122, 324 
200, 343 
244 
200 
328 
244 
200 

200, 290, 343 

327 
136 
272 
157 
200 

200, 334 
134, 135 

200 
255 
244 
255 
313 
200 
16 
290 
328 
271 
322 
322 
340 
201 
337 
200 
201 

201, 302, 305 

255 
305 
181 
328 
255 
201 
333 
298 

256, 266 
328 
201 

201,299 
256 

201, 293 
328 
256 
315 

201, 298 
256 
339 
133 

201, 301 

80 

288 

201 



Coons, Christina 
Cooper, Alison 
Cooper, Greg 
Cooper, Jennifer 
Copeland, Kim 
Copeland, Kimberly 
Copeland, Kristin 
Copeland, Melissa 
Copeland, Ron 
Copen, Blair 
Copenhaver, Herbie 
Copp, James 
Corbin, Randall 
Corcoran, Candace 
Cordeiro, Sara 
Cordiano, Lisa 
Cordle, Maria 
Cordovana, James 
Corey, Christine 
Corprew, Charles 
Correia, Brian 
Correie, Brian 
Cortezi, Meg 
Corzine, Kristina 
Costello, Elyse 
Costello, Wendy 
Cothker, Doug 
Cotton, Ericka 
Couart, Greg 
Coughlin, Jen 
Counts, Christy 
Coursey, John 
Cowles, Dean 
Cox, Bryan 
Cox, Caroline 
Cox, Jay 
Cox, Lisa 
Cozens, Christi 
Cozens, Christi 
Crabbs, Lisa 
Craig, Chris 
Craig, Tim 
Cravv-ford, Beth 
Crawford, Geoff 
Crawford, Jenna 
Crawford, Kelli 
Craybas, Jody 
Crayhas, Jody 
Creekmore, Jeff 
Crider, Cathy 
Crisci, Jacqueline 
Crist, Niki 
Crocker, Dave 
Crockett, Andrew 
Crockett, E. 
Crompton, Todd 
Cronin, Maggie 
Cronk, Daryl 
Cropper, Zadock 
Croushore, Rick 
Crowder, Warren 
Crowley, Colleen 
Croxton, Ryan 
Cruce, Danny 
Crumlish, Shawn 
Crupi, Diana 
Cruse, Chuck 
Crutchfield, Lisa 
Cuk, Vladimir 
Gulp, Laura 
Culuko, Kent 
Cummings, Robert 
Cunneen, Maureen 
Cunningham, Wendy 
Cuper, Prudence 
Curd, Tommi 
Curley, Jason 
Curran, Nick 
Cuttino, Marcus 
Cyr, Matthew 
Czaja, Fran 



244 

201,324 
313 

256, 322 
324 

256, 288 
201 
322 
232 
272 
339 
201 

201,337 
244 
339 
295 
305 
256 
120 
201 

293, 298 
201 
161 
272 
256 
272 
333 
201 
330 
324 
327 
133 
334 
343 

148, 149 
339 
201,289,339 
327 
201 
201, 291, 305 
304 
304 
201 
133 
312 

256, 327 
244 
149 
330 

201,328 
272 
145 
330 
330 
201 
182 
290 
244 
124 

115,117 
201 
256 
66 
42 
330 
201 
133 
202 

126,165 

202 

162,165,167 

340 

256, 322 
202 
202 
48, 202 
299 
333 
133 
256 
24 



DDDDD 



D'Amato, Emily 
D'Arby, Jodi 
Daggett, Patricia 



257 

64 

312 



Daggett, Patricia 
Dale, Krissi 
Daley, Christina 
Dallas, Deborah 
Daly, E. 
Daly, Katie 
Dam, Franklin 
Damianos, Thomas 
Damoth, Michael 
Danewitz, Susan 
Daniel, Valerie 
Danoff, Barry 
Darabond, Dan 
Dardine, Cynthia 
Darius, Chris 
Darrough, Alexander 
Daub, John 
Daugherty, Brandy 
Daughtry, Marcia 
Daum, Lindy 
Davey, Jeremy 
David, Kristen 
Davide, Michele 
Davis, Amanda 
Davis, Angela 
Davis, Ben 
Davis, Eric 
Davis, Michael 11 
Davis, Sham 
Davis, Sheri 
Davis, Steffany 
Davis, Wanda 
Davis, William 
Daw, Matt 
Dawson, Alex 
Day, Richard 
Day, Stephanie 
Day, Timothy 
Dean, Raymond 
Dean, Stephanie 
Deck, Angela 
Deck, Michelle 
Decker, Kristi 
Deel, Bridget 
DeFilippis, Andrew 
DeFilippis, Carmine 
Delaney, John 
Delaney, Tara 
Delborello, David 
Delk, Patricia 
Delk, Patricia 
Dellers, Jeffrey 
Delmarco, Robert 
DeLuca, Hip 
DeLuca, Joey 
Demeo, Priscilla 
Denham, Deborah 
Dennis, Heather 
Dennis, Rayne 
Denslow, Christy 
DePersia, Kristine 
Derby, Lara 
Dererman, Nicole 
Deringer, Kevin 
DeRose, Anne 
Derr, Amy 
Desai, Amit 
DeSantis, Caroline 
DeSantis, Caroline 
Desarno, Katherine 
Desmond, Carrie 
Desmond, Sean 
Dessar, John 
DeStefano, Mark 
Detrick, Doug 
DeVight, John 
DeYulia, Deb 
DiBartolo, Brian 
Dick, LaurieAnn 
Dickenson, Lloyd 
Dickenson, Phil 
Dickerson, Jennifer 
Dickinson, Denise 
Dickinson, Michele 
Didrickson, Sara 
Dietel, Kristin 
Diezel, Matt 
DiiBon, Tracy 



202 
305 
202 
324 
244 
328 
256, 288, 297 
272 
202 
272 
256 
296 
244 
202 
343 
202 
315 
272 

244, 308 
328 
178 
181 
337 
291 
202 
71 
202,291,293 
202 
244 
339 
337 

313, 334 

163,165,166 

41 

337 

256 

244, 301 
257 
202 
327 
244 
337 
202 

257, 305 
182 
330 
334 
244 
343 

294, 303 
202 
202 
298 
314 
333 

202, 307 
337 
202 

257, 289 
244 
202 
337 
272 
333 
298 
272 
202 
327 
257 
202 
32,33,117,192,202,316 
25 
70 
202 
182 
328 

148, 149 
203 
324 
257 
151 
272 
324 

203, 327 
203 

257, 337 
301 
244 



Dillahunt, Shenda 
Dillon, Janet 
Dimino, Terri 
Dinh, Uyen 
Dino, Theresa 
Dionazio, Alissa 
DiPalo, Diane 
DiTrani, Christine 
DiTullio, Rob 
DiTullio, Robert 
Divers, Douglas 
Dix, Heidi 
Dixon, Michael 
Doane, David 
Doane, Russ 
Dobbins, Deitra 
Dobbs, Sophia 
Dodd, Marcey 
Dodge, Andrea 
Dodson, Melissa 
Doetsch, Erik 
Dohner, Lynne 
Dolan, Michael 
Dolan, Shannon 
Dolby, Lori 
Dolby, Thomas 
Dombrowski, Bernie 
Domroe, Kristen 
Donaldson, Jennifer 
Donavan, Michael 
Donnelly, Jennifer 
Donnini, Zachary 
Donohoe, Alice 
Doran, James 
Dorr, Robert 
Dorsey, Juan 
Dorsey, Marie 
Dougherty, K.C. 
Dougherty, Kimberly 
Douglas, James 
Douglas, Michael 
Douglas, Noelle 
Douglas, W. 
Douglass, Amy 
Douglass, Tara 
Dovel, Steve 
Dowell, Teresa 
Downen, Todd 
Downing, Jennifer 
Doyle, Laura 
Doyle, Peter 
Draetta, Joseph 
Drake, Doug 
Driesell, Carolyn 
Driesell, Chuck 
Driesell, Lefty 
Driscoll, Janet 
Drory, Beth 
Drummond, Jennifer 
Drummond, Kevin 
Dubicki, Beth 
Dubin, Andrea 
Dubois, Craig 
Duck, Kimberly 
Dudley, Katy 
Duff, Erin 
Duff, Thomas 
Duffield, Troy 
Duffy, Lisa 
Duhan, Hilary 
Duke, Anne 
Duke, Kelly 
Duley, Matthew 
Dunbar, Michele 
Dunbar, Richard 
Duncan, Ann 
Duncan, Dave 
Dunham, Chad 
Dunn, Clint 
Dunn, Damia 
Dunn, Randall 
DuRocher, Edward 
Duszak, Michael 
Duty, Christine 
Duvall, Jill 
Dykes, Jamie 
Dymond, Veronica 



257: 
257 
81,203,297,303 
203! 
327 
272 
203 
203, 304 
343 
203 
272 
61 
304 
212 
212 
120 E 

272, 339 
154 
134 

257, 339 
178 

301,328 
257 
291 
244 
305 

203,343 
203 
141 
337 
257 
272 
272 

273, 289 
203 
133 
337 

94 
257 
203 
343 
203 
203 
203 
203 
330 
244 
136 

203, 293 
327 
203 
293 
333 
203 
165 
165,292,293 

203, 314 
273 
324 

203, 301 
70, 258 
328' 
203 
244 
122 
244 
203 
330 
298 
322 
203 
322 
330 

203, 304 

273 

38 

93 

257 

132, 133 

301,324 
204,288,291,305 
244 
340 
273 
273 
141 
204 



37^ 



Index 



E E E E E 



Eagle, Tyler 


337 


Earle, Andrea 


257 


Earle, Juvonia 


294 


Earnhardt, Jeff 


305 


Eaton, Joan 


204, 328 


Echols, Douglas 


204 


Economou, Tom 


343 


Eder, Marilynne 


204, 306 


Edmonds, Africa 


204 


Edmonds, James 


204, 339 


Edmundson, Marcia 


244,315 


Edwards, Aimee 


204 


Edwards, Brant 


321 


Edwards, Bryan 


162,164,165,167 


Edwards, Kathryn 


273 


Edwards, Marcia 


244 


Edwards, Melanie 


245 


Egan, Heather 


273 


Eichler, Clifford 


257 


Eimer, Barry 


296 


Elam, David 


204 


Eldridge, Robin 


173 


Eley, William 


258, 259 


EUingsen, Christopher 


273 


Ellington, Logan 


304 


Elliot, Amy 


75, 122, 384 


Elliot, Dusty 


340 


ElUot, Zach 


291, 340 


Ellis, Laura 


273 


Ellis, Sheri 


95,312 


Ellyson, LeAnn 


327 


Elmore, Lori 


245 


Elmore, Susan 


204 


Elnahal, Shereen 


204 


Emore, Carla 


258, 259 


Engel, Lisa 


258, 259 


Engledow, Wells 


337 


English, Jennifer 


204, 294 


Engstrom, Karen 


322 


Ensley, Cynthia 


258, 259 


Eppard, Jesse 


133 


Epps, Clif 


133 


Erb, Stepahnie 


312 


Erb, Stephanie 


258, 259 


Erdman, Jennifer 


204, 294 


Erhart, Michael 


245 


Erhart, Mike 


343 


Erickson, Christian 


330 


Erickson, Katre 


339 


Ernst, Chad 


343 


Ernst, Christopher 


290, 343 


Errico, Lisa 


204, 328 


Errierson, Peggy 


204 


Ertel, Matthew 


204 


Espanol, Elbert 


304 


Estrella, MarvAnne 


204 


Eubanks, Camilla 


204 


Evans, Anne 


204 


Evans, Katherine 


204 


Evans, Keith 


204, 340 


Evans, Natalie 


82, 122 


Evans, Nathan 


204 


Evans, Thomas 


204 


Evans, Vanessa 


204, 308 


Everett, Rachel 


322 


Everitt, Holly 


273 


Everton, Michael 


48 


Evins, Scott 


258, 259 


Ewing, Laura 


273 


Extrom, Matt 


298 


Eyrich, Karin 


204, 326, 327 



FFFFF 



Facchiano, Gregory 
Fadely, Laura 
Fahey, John 
Faikish, Kevin 
Fair, Jon 
Fair, Ted 
Fairchild, Nathan 
Falls, Stacey 
Falwell, Tara 



340 
310 
343 
78 
182 
321 
136 
294 
205, 301 



Fannin, Misti 
Farabaugh, Mike 
Farano, Louis 
Fariss, Christie 
Farmer, Jacqeline 
Farmer, Jacqueline 
Farmer, Kathryn 
Farmer, Stephen 
Farnholt, Patrick 
Farnsworth, Tibbie 
Farrar, Lisa 
Farris, Travis 
Fastiggi, Chris 
Fatouros, Thomas 
Fawcett, Amanda 
Fedalen, Josh 
Feden, Will 
Fedullo, Anthony 
Feldman, Monica 
Felkdman, Monica 
Fenrich, John 
Ferguson, Anne 
Ferguson, Barbara 
Ferguson, Chip 
Ferguson, Claire 
Ferguson, Danielle 
Ferguson, Eleanor 
Feria, Gina 
Fernandez, Stephen 
Ferrel, Susan 
Ferrigno, Gina 
Fettig, Bill 
Feys, Cara 
Fields, Melinda 
Fiencke, Jonathan 
Fikremariam, Rachel 
Finch, Michael 
Finch, Monica 
Finney, Chanson 
Finney, Ly 
Firestone, Lori 
Firestone, Ray 
Firestone, Roy 
Firkins, Angela 
Firth, Susan 
Fischer, Meredith 
Fischer, Sarah 
Fischetti, Diana 
Fisher, Becca 
Fisher, Katrina 
Fitch, Chris 
Fitzgerald, Amy 
Fitzgerald, Sharon 
Fitzmaurice, Caitlyn 
Fix, John 
Flaherty, Thomas 
Flamm, Brian 
Flannery, Jen 
Flannery, Jon 
Flannery, Karen 
Flannery, Matt 
Flechner, Debra 
Flechner, Stacy 
Fleming, Altrina 
Fleming, David 
Fleming, Kavis 
Fleming, Susan 
Fleming, Terri 
Fleshman, Scott 
Fleshood, Eric 
Fleshood, Kristen 
Flester, Kenneth 
Flood, Heather 
Flora, Ginger 
Flora, Tiffany 
Floyd, Kelly 
Floyd, Kelly 
Foley, Alison 
Folks, Kristen 
Folston, Teri 
Fontenot, Connie 
Fonzi, Ginger 
Foote, Bill 
Forbes, Paul 
Ford, Dave 
Ford, Jennifer 
Ford, Susan 
Forehand, Jenny 



205 
65 
339 
273 
205 
294 

258, 259 
305 
232 
205 
205 
294 
117 
340 

258, 259 

294, 330 
334 
205 

205, 295 
337 
343 
205 
205 
304 
245 
245 

205, 321 

205 

124,125,205 

120 

205 

119,298 
205 
205 
273 

258, 259 
133 
327 
205 
339 

205, 288 
273 
288 
55, 298 
304 
339 
315 
301 
258, 259, 327 
273 
33 
205 
205 
181 
205 
333 
178 
181 
333 
274 
330 

245, 304 
304 
297 
133 
4,245 
327 
122, 258, 259 
205 
205 
274 
205 
245 
205 
258, 259, 327 
311 
205 
141 
245 
308 
206 
245 
333 
206 
340 

258, 259 

58 

327 



Foreman, Monyette 
Foreman, Pamela 
Foreman, Shawn 
Forester, Scott 
Forrar, Jayne 
Forrey, Stephen 
Forster, Scott 
Fortescue, Jeffrey 
Foskuhl, David 
Foster, Ashley 
Foster, Stephaney 
Foster, Todd 
Fox, Brian 
Fox, Chuck 
Fox, Tina 
Foxx, Dion 
Fraley, Tod 
Francis, Cynthia 
Francis, Elizabeth 
Francis, Julie 
Frank, Heidi 
Frank, Nick 
Franklin, Kevin 
Franko, Matt 
Frantz, Mae 
Eraser, Allison 
Fratkin, Amy 
Frazier, Scott 
Frazier, Steve 
Freda, Melissa 
Frederick, Diana 
Freed, Becky 
Freed, William 
Freeland, Sharon 
Freeman, Cameron 
Freeman, Cheryl 
Freeman, Dana 
Freeman, Gina 
Freeman, Jackie 
Freeman, Monyette 
Freeman, Tiajuana 
Freihage, Erika 
Frey, Christie 
Frey, Christina 
Frey, Sloan 
Fricker, Jason 
Friday, Kelly 
Friedl, Stacey 
Friend, Carolyn 
Fries, Katherine 
Frith, Sarah 
Frost, Lee 
Frutchey, Debra 
Fruth, Michelle 
Frye, Jenny 
Fudella, Bridgette 
Fugit, James 
Fuller, Blessed 
Fuller, Christopher 
Fuller, Kristin 
Fullerton, Elaine 
Fulmer, Brian 
Fulmer, Donna 
Funk, Stacie 
Fylstra, William 
Fyock, Brian 



Gabler, Matt 
Gabriele, Mark 
Gadams, Buddy 
Gaglioti, Enrico 
Gagnon, Carolyn 
Gaines, Danny 
Galang, Shaun 
Gale, William 
Gallagher, Megan 
Galvin, Erin 
Galvin, Katie 
Gannon, Kevin 
Gardner, Alex 
Gardner, Karen 
Gardner, Margaret 
Gardner, Theresa 
Garland, Judith 
Garpow, Wendy 





206 


Garpow, Wendy 


207 




206, 313 


Garretson, Robert 


245 




119 


Garrett, Brendan 


207 




117 


Garrett, Laura 


240 




206 


Garrison, Anne 


280, 305 




16,206 


Garst, Amy 


322 




97, 334 


Gartrell, Amy 


207, 304 




206 


Gathright, Jonathan 


207 




165 


Gatley, Sarah-Jane 


207,301,304 




258, 259 


Gaul, David 


207 




309 


Gauthier, Scott 


186 




304 


Gaver, Jennifer 


274 




258, 259, 334 


Gawlik, Yolanda 


259 




212, 337 


Gaylord, John 


133 




245, 301 


Gease, Trene 


322 




133 


Gecoma, Christine 


274 




63 


Geddes, Erin 


259 




206 


Geddie, John 


304 




206 


Gelfond, Karen 


245,291,298 




327 


Gelfond, Natalie 


134, 135 




259 


Gellis, Elissa 


322 




340 


Gellis, Elissa 


207 




324 


Gelven, Mary 


207 




178 


Gendron, Jennifer 


207 




301 


Gerard, Karen 


207 




322 


Gerber, Julie 


327 




259 


Gianniny, Chanses 


207 




133 


Gibbon, Marie 


274 




52 


Gibbons, Brad 


333 




120, 152, 153 


Gibrall, Mary 


207, 299 




274 


Gibson, Amy 


259 




294 


Gibson, Beth 


207 




206, 299 


Gibson, Christina 


259, 310 




181 


Gibson, Joseph 


207 




206 


Gies, Jeffrey 


207 




206 


Giesler, Christopher 


274 




206 


Gifford, Bonnie 


259 




206 


Gilbert, Scott 


274,315 




173 


Gililland, Nikie 


322 




308 


Gill, Barrey 


340 




313 


Gill, Linda 


274 


75 


206,291,327 


Gillespie, Jennifer 


207, 327 




291,303 


Gilliam, Kay 


301 




245 


Gilliam, Lori 


207 




182, 330 


Gilliatt, Jeffrey 


245, 288, 303 




339 


Gilmer, Kim 


313 




206,291,296 


Cinder, Chad 


117 




259 


Ginn, David 


313 




206, 321 


Giordano, Jared 


182 




259 


Gische, Randi 


245, 306 




245 


Glass, Brian 


274 




206, 339 


Glassbrook, David 


207 




274 


Glauner, Heather 


90, 267 




206 


Glazebrook, Ashley 


301 




274 


Glembocki, Catherine 


207 




153 


Click, Marcy 


328 




321 


Glickman, Douglas 


207, 293 




206 


Glisch, Jon 


258 




259 


Gloede, Lise 


274 




259 


Glover, Wendy 


274 




274 


Glynn, Heather 


339 




274 


Gobbi, Tiffany 


32,117,207,316 




206 


Gochenour, Jason 


207 




206, 339 


Godby, Leslie 


290 




206 


Godding, Mindy 


274 




278, 307 


Godley, Leslie 


208 


•^N 


> ^^\ 


Goebel, Tracy 


337 




■ 1 


Goetschius, Jenni 


337 


J 


1 VJ 


Goetz, Frank 


208 






Goewey, Stephen 


304 




147 


Goff, Sharon 


208 




178 


Goldberg, Kenda 


290 




339 


Goldberger, Trina 


339 




136 


Goldstein, Dan 


339 




259, 324 


Goldstein, Dave 


340 




333 


Goldstein, Susan 


324 




245 


Golinuaux, John 


79 




321 


Gollayan, Lori 


259 




296 


Goller, Robert 


245, 304 




207 


Gomez, Fernando 


208 




327 


Gonzales, Maritess 


208, 301, 304 




328 


Gonzales, Norm 


304 




182 


Gonzalez, Victor 


337 




67, 339 


Gooch, Dana 


304 




207 


Good, David 


208 




75 


Goode, Alicea 


259 




207 


Gooding, Lamont 


133 




294, 327 


Goodloe, Elizabeth 


270, 274 



Index 375 



GtXKiloe, Jim 
Goodman, David 
Goodman, Katie 
Goodman, Lesa 
Goodstein, Chuck 
Goodwin, Sean 
Goodwin, Tlieresa 
Goodwin, Ulysses 
Goorevitz, Tamara 
Gordick, Robert 
Gordon, Carrie 
Gordon, Chimisa 
Gordon, John 
Gordon, Mike 
Gordon, Todd 
Gorman, Jennifer 
Gosline, Alisa 
Goss, Donna 
Gothelf , Jeff 
Gottdiener, Bessie 
Gottleib, Michael 
Gottlieb, Michael 
Gould, Charles Jr. 
Gould, Heather 
Gowell, Sherrv' 
Gowen, Christopher 
Gower, Christopher 
Graber, Scott 
Grace, John 
Grace, Pat 
Gracyalnv, Jen 
Graeser, Chans 
Gragnani, Christine 
Graham, Cannie 
Grahn, Kim 
Grammer, Mary 
Granados, Maria 
Granados, Mimi 
Granger, Douglas 
Grant, Cynthia 
Grantham, Sandra 
Gravelle, Marie 
Graves, Kevin 
Gray, Angela 
Gray, Brian 
Gray, Catherine 
Gray, Sean 
Gray, TaUta 
Greczek, Beth 
Green, Latia 
Greene, Kathy 
Greene, Tom 
Greener, Craig 
Greenhalgh, William 
Greenleaf, Rebecca 
Greer, Rachel 
Greer, Susan 
Gregorio, Jennifer 
Gregorio, Lillian 
Gregory, Corrinne 
Gregory, Stacie 
Greis, Andrew 
Gresham, Dawn 
Grey, Laurie 
Griffin, Elizabeth 
Griffin, Stephanie 
Griffiths, Bonnie 
Griggs, Nathan 
Griles, Tim 
Grimsley, Allan 
Grimsley, Amanda 
Grinnell, Jennifer 
Gripper, Carly 
Grippo, Karen 
Grocki, Steve 
Grogan, Margaret 
Groome, Emily 
Grooms, Lauri 
Gross, Elizabeth 
Gross, Nancy 
Gross, Shannon 
Grossman, Jennifer 
Grove, Lisa 
Grubbs, Melissa 
Gryder, Melinda 
Guardacasta, Annie 
Guarino, John 
Guenther, Natalie 



333 
340 
310 
208 
333 
133 
208 
133 

259, 291 
208 
327 
313 
273 
182 
328 
208 

186,187,208,278,299 
260 
237 

208, 339 
333 
208 
208 
208 
310 
208 
245 

142, 143 
307 
343 
327 
208, 226, 324 
328 
328 
145 

208, 298 
208 
307 
260 
324 
208 
337 
208 

208, 324 
182 
208 

91,311 
274 
304 
301 
311 
118,119 
208 
208 
134 
245 
324 

209, 324 
91,245,312 

293 
209 
209 
274 

274, 306 
209 
337 
245 
49 
333 
245, 288, 333 
274 
187 
245 
327 
343 

209, 305 
337 

209, 288 
260 

260, 294 
337 

33, 209 
274 
274 
312 
337 
182, 343 
299 



Gugliemo, Meg 




158 


Harris, Catherme 


Guilfoyle, Joe 


78, 316 


Harris, Christina 


Guilliams, Melissa 




274 


Harris, Divi 


Guinto, Richard 




305 


Harris, Julie 


Guise, Rene 




322 


Harris, Karen 


Guise, Susan 




298 


Harris, Karen 


Guise, Tracey 




209 


Harris, Mandy 


Gulino, Ange 




327 


Harris, Sonya 


Gunter, Matt 




330 


Harris, Yolanda 


Gupta, Mona 




153 


Harrison, Deborah 


Gurile, Michelle 


173,209 


,294 


Harrison, Gina 


Gumey, Eizabeth 




158 


Hart, Mary 


Gusler, Lisa 




327 


Hartary, Christopher 


Gustafson, Rachel 


260 


,304 


Hartley, Carrie 


Gustin, Heather 


246, 298 


,316 


Hartman, Cynthia 


Gutter, Graham 




334 


Hartzog, Jason 


Gutterman, Adam 

HHH 


HH 


209 


Harvev, Jennifer 
Hash, John II 
Hass, Lisa 
Hatfield, Aaron 
Haudenshield, John 


Haack, Kirsten 




301 


Hauser, Julie 


Habay, Caryn 




157 


Hawk, Kathy 


Habay, Nicole 


112 


,322 


Hawkes, Yolanda 


Hackett, Jennifer 




246 


Hawkins, Amy 


Hackett, Windy 




327 


Hawkins, Deana 


Haddad, Randa 


246 


,327 


Hawkins, Geni 


Haddock, Jennifer 




246 


Hawkins, Greg 


Hague, H. 


209 


,297 


Hawkins, Kelly 


Hagy, Kimberly 




246 


Hawley, Erica 


Hagy, Leslie 




246 


Haws, Chris 


Hagy, Rene 




294 


Haws, Christopher 


Hahn, Kerri 




122 


Hawthorne, Scott 


Haile, Rebecca 


117,316 


,339 


Hayden, Katina 


Haines, Karen 


209 


,327 


Hayes, Elizabeth 


Hajj, Nicole 




209 


Hayes, Jason 


Haldane, Todd 




333 


Hayes, Mary 


Hale, Chase 




165 


Hays, Chris 


Hales, Heather 


260, 327 


Hays, Samatha 


Haley, John 




209 


Hayton, Michael 


Hall.'Christine 




260 


Hazelgrove, Kirk 


Hall, Courtney 




209 


Headley, Sarah 


Hall, Ian 




117 


Heaney, Liz 


HaH, J.C. 




133 


Heard, Jermifer 


Hall, Monique 




209 


Heath, Carrie 


Hall, Regan 




291 


Heath, Timmy 


Hall, Regina 


275 


,324 


Heatwole, Ray 


Hall, Robyn 




246 


Hechler, Glenn 


Halloway, David 




75 


Hee, Kristine 


Hallowell, Diane 




112 


Heffeman, Danyle 


Halm, Rosetta 




209 


Heffner, Mike 


Halsall, Stuart 




136 


Heinbaugh, Krissy 


Halterman, Deborah 




209 


Heiser, Kristen 


Hames, Whit 




62 


Heisler, Frank 


Hamilton, Amanda 




275 


Held, Karen 


Hamilton, Bob 


182 


,183 


Held, Paige 


Hamilton, Cheryl 


209 


,313 


Helfen, Dave 


Hammel, Sara 




301 


Heller, Dana 


Hammel, Sara 




209 


Henderson, Suzanne 


Hammond, Robin 




246 


Henley, Tonya 


Hammond-Tooke, Anne 




294 


Hennessey, Kate 


Hamp, Alicia 




275 


Henretta, Kathleen 


Hancher, Cynthia 




275 


Henry, Ginnie 


Hancock, Annehese 


209, 322 


Henry, Jay 


Handy, Cheryl 




324 


Henry, Virginia 


Hanger, Shelley 




297 


Henson, Josh 


Hannam, J.J. 




333 


Herbert, Lee 


Hannum, Stephanie 




209 


Herbert, Melissa 


Hanover, Kim 




327 


Herbert, Stephanie 


Hansen, Cathryn 




209 


Herceg, Ken 


Hansen, Jennifer 




275 


Herd, Corey 


Happel, Charlie 




343 


Herman, Matt 


Haralampus, Lori 




246 


Herndon, Rachelle 


Harding, Darcey 




275 


Herndon, Tina 


Harding, Trendee 




209 


Herr, Kent 


Hargett, Kristen 




209 


Herrick, Sarah 


Harlow, Jennifer 




260 


Heschler, Glen 


Harper, Bill 




133 


Hess, Cherri 


Harper, Kimberly 




275 


Hess, Christopher 


Harper, Landon 




147 


Hess, Mike 


Harria, Alan 




288 


Heyer, Deanne 


Harrington, David 




266 


Hiatt, Jennifer 


Harrington, Mary 




154 


Hiatt, Michele 


Harrington, Sean 


275 


,303 


Hibbert, Kate 


Harris, Alison 


17,48,154 


,304 


Hicks, Avis 


Harris, Alison 




210 


Hicks, Jeff 


Harris, Annette 




210 


Hicks, Joseph 


Harris, Brian 




339 


Hicks, Travis 



275, 339 
260 
340 

210, 305 
311 
260 
312 

210,297 
210 
210 
210 
210 
275 

260, 328 
275 
305 
294 
210 
275 
151 
133 
324 
181 
308 
337 
210 
210 
64 
119 
260, 291, 322 

235, 316 
210 
210 
260 
210 
275 

187, 260 
321 
324 
210 

210,340 
275 
120, 152, 153 
210 
339 
339 

116,117 
136 
210 

112,157 
314 
173 
291 
210 

243, 339 
339 
321 
210 
210 

246, 302 
339 
210 
324 
41 
260 
182 
210 
152 
120, 153, 160 
182 

260, 291 
147 
210 
275 
260 

210, 289 
343 

211,305 

211 

343 

211,293,327 

40 

40, 327 

260 

309 

340 

211 

182 



Higgins, Amy 
Higgins, Denise 
Higgins, John 
High, Tanya 
Higman, Joseph 
Hilbert, Laura 
Hiidebrand, Tricia 
Hill, Hope 
Hill, Janai 
Hill, Jennifer 
Hill, Roberta 
Hilliard, Carol 
Hillow, Alison 
Hinck, Kristine 
Hinely, Hannah 
Hines, Mari 
Hines, Sheryl 
Hinkel, David 
Hino, Chisa 
Hinz, Stephen 
Hipson, Tanya 
Hitchings, L. 
Hoadley, Rob 
Hodges, Matt 
Hodsdon, Hope 
Hoehlein, Heather 
Hoffler, Christi 
Hoffman, Erin 
Hoffman, Kristen 
Hogge, Thomas 
Hogston, Chad 
Hohert, Chandra 
Hoisington, Deana 
Hoke, Karen 
Holden, Bryan 
Holick, David 
Holland, Barbara 
Holland, Kerry 
Holland, Tonva 
Holland, Jim 
Holler, Beth 
Holliday, Dave 
Holloway, David II 
Holloway, David III 
Holmes, Robert 
Holmes, Yvette 
Holmquist, Kristen 
Holsinger, Larry 
Hoisington, Deana 
Holt, Bryan 
Holt, Kathryn 
Holt, Odessa 
Holthaus, Matt 
Homer, Jennifer 
Honaker, Karen 
Hong, John 
Honnold, Marcy 
Hood, Tara 
Hope, Karen 
Hopewell, Rob 
Hopkins, Heather 
Hopkins, Lee 
Hopkins, Miranda 
Hoppe, Dawn 
Horan, Jennifer 
Hordell, Adam 
Horisaka, Ken 
Horsch, Bob 
Horsley, Jennifer 
Horton, Alicia 
Horton, David 
Horton, Ronald 
Horton, Stacy 
Hossenlopp, Lele 
Houchens, Mary 
Houston, Terri 
Hovey, Amity 
Howard, Amy 
Howard, Chris 
Howard, Elizabeth 
Howard, Jennifer 
Howard, Jenny 
Howard, Katie 
Howard, M. 
Howard, Michael 
Howard, Michelle 
Howard, Niki 
Howdyshell, Rebecca 



328 
211 
275 

246, 337 
275 

211,288 
324 
211 
120 
260 
211 

156, 157 
291 
275 
211,293,327 
211 
211 
339 
246 
211 
246 
211 
119,151 
340 
211 

156, 157 
339 
322 
211 
305 

203, 330 
260 
304 
211,294,339 
178 
316 
328 
339 
312 
330 
246 

119,151 

294, 295 
211 
284 
275 
211 
285 
246 
275 
211 
337 
118,119,151,160 
260 

117,211 
260 
211 
334 

211,337 

343 

170,173,174 

52 

310 

211 

211,307 
275 
337 
178 
304 

278, 298 
260 
211 
340 
141 
260 
308 
24, 246 
212 
216 
212 
117,260,316,327 
246, 291, 301 
327 
212 
133 
294 
275 
261 



»1 



J, erf 

' ,:J,0« 

," dMe 

,' i!.Mil 

ti-.**' 
}.,.!,io,|eii 



376 



Index 



1JJ|16,8W 

liijte.Plei 

i,T» 

mM 

|uk,Slmi 
lull Pan 
jiikv.Ut 
Imle.Mil 

luiLAdiB 
tali. 

biTBki 

tai.W. 

bterjon 

lml9,Paii 

WTm 

liiiWD 

tel, lefts 

klet 

lM,Hal 

liilfc.Bi 

luldiinson, 

luldwon 

Imetl.Sea] 



t3di,Meg; 

Di,Rotet 
nguUiJau 
KaiIo,Q 
rani.Sliirip 
raniie^d,^ 
'Hh 
rat, Mai 
™ J lean 
viv.ta 



a'p,l««pl 
ibionslv,' 
aR lemji 
aim Br 

i«,Ka 

ad.«n,\'i 

'i-^ii.Sts 
"^IVi 



a.se.p 



Howell, Debra 
Howell, Elizabeth 
Hewlett, Shari 
Howze, Thomas 
Hovle, Cynthia 
Hubbard, Christopher 
i liibbard. Melody 
Hubbard, Mike 
Hublev, Jessica 
Hubley, Karen 
Hudgins, Brad 
Hudgins, John 
Hudgins, Scott 
Hudson, Brandi 
Hudson, Donna 
Huepper, Jeffrey 
Hueston, Jennifer 
Huff, Bob 
Huffman, Jeffrey 
Huffman, Patrick 
Huffman, Susan 
Hufnage, Sarah 
Hughes, Brian 
Hughes, Carron 
Hughes, Katherine 
iHughes, Michael 
Hughes, Pleasant 
Hughes, Sheila 
Hughes, Trad 
Huh, Stefan 
Hulett, Kurt 
Hulin, Shari 
Hull, Patra 
Hulsey, Laura 
Humke, Matt 
Hummel, David 
Hunt, Adam 
Hunt, E. 
Hunt, Karen 
Hunt, Tisha 
Hunt, W. 
Hunter, Jon 
Hunter, Paul 
Hurd, Tiombe 
Hurlburt, Darren 
Hurst, Jeffrey 
Hurst, Laura 
Hurt, Lee 
Huser, Hal 
Hutchins, Brian 
Hutchinson, Brian 
Hutchinson, Karl 
Huyett, Sean 
Hynds, Thomas Jr, 



Mill 



Ibach, Megan 
Ibiezugbe, Napoleon 
Im, Robert 
Ingulli, Jennifer 
Inzerillo, Christopher 
Irani, Shirin 
Irannejad, Neda 
Irrgang, Jennifer 
Irvine, Marcia 
Irving, jeanine 
Ivey, Christy 



JJJJJ 



Jaap, Joseph 
Jablonsky, Mary 
Jabs, Jennifer 
Jackson, Bryan 
Jackson, Cheryl 
Jackson, Erica 
Jackson, Floretta 
Jackson, Karen 
Jackson, Kevin 
Jackson, Niki 
Jackson, Scott 
Jackson, Steven 
Jackson, Wendi 
Jaffe, Eileen 
Jager, Pirn 



212 

261,312 
212 
212 
212 
212 
304 
117 

261,327 
327 
133 
212 
333 
212, 314, 339 
212 
246 
246 
330 

212, 305 
212 
212 
212 
275 
212 

261, 304 
304 

142, 143 
212 
333 

178, 293 
182 
212 
212 

212, 291 
79, 96, 316 
343 
340 
69,212,316 
322 
298 
246 
165 
212 
120 
293 
212 
261 
327 
305 
70 
122 
261 
333 
212 



275 
324 
89 
213 
340 
322 
298 
322 
213 
339 
246 



213, 333 
213 
213 
133 
291 
213 
173 

213, 295 
67 

213,313 
118,119,151 

133,213 

261, 337 
337 
343 



ager, Willem 
ahanian, Robin 
ain, Rosita 
akaitis, Michael 
akaitis, Paul 
akubowski, Kerry 
alio, Jenny 
amerson, Beth 
amieson, Meredith 
anca, Margaret 
anik, Kimberly 
ansen, Michael 
anz, Francine 

rbadan, Ignaz 
arnecke. Erica 
arvis, Rebecca 
aunrubenis. Amber 
aynes, Calay 
azaeri, Omid 
efferson. Randy 
effrey, Tom 
eft'ries. Amy 
eneby, Resha 
enkins, Andy 
enkins, Elliot 
enkins, Gary 
enkins, Jessica 
enkins, Lisa 
enkins, Michael 
enkins, Todd 
enkinson, Sarah 
enks, Michael 
erding. Grant 
ernigan, Tanya 
ernigan, Tonya 
essen, Kristine 
essen, Kristy 
eter, Kelvin 
ohn, Shabu 
bhnson, Aiease 
ohnson, Allan 
ohnson, Andrea 
ohnson, Billy 
ohnson. Bob 
bhnson, Britt 
ohnson, Courtney 
ohnson, Dayle 
ohnson, Ethan 
ohnson. Faith 
bhnson, James 
bhnson, Jennifer 
bhnson, Jill 
bhnson, Kara 
ohnson, Keith 
bhnson, Kelly 
ohnson, Kevin 
ohnson, Kristin 
ohnson. Matt 
ohnson, Meghan 
ohnson, Patrice 
ohnson, Robert 
ohnson, Scott 
ohnson, Steve 
ohnston. Bob 
ones, Anita 
ones, Anthony 
ones, Caryn 
ones, Charles 
ones, Charlie 
ones, Eric 
ones, Greg 
ones, Hassan 
ones. Heather 
ones, Jason 
ones. Jay 
ones, Jennifer 
ones, Jonathan 
ones, Karen 
ones, Katrice 
ones, Kevin 
ones, Norman 
ones, Renell 
ones, Robert 
ones, Sheri 
ones, Todd 
onker, Jennifer 
ordan, Brian 
ordan, Tony 
osel, Gavrielle 



213 
275 

338, 339 
337 
133 
213 
339 

213, 322 

148, 149 
276 
213 

129, 133 

213,327 
213 

310, 327 

213 

154,155,246 

144,145,213,261 

178 

15,333 

119,151 

291,324 

213,324 
182 

294, 330 
71 
314 
276 
333 
143 
304 
185 
314 
321 
213 
213 
149 
133 
213 

213, 321 
324 

302, 327 
133 
137 
337 
327 
276 
246 
213 

261,305 

261 

11,70,258,327 

213,312 
334 

213, 293 
339 

294, 297 
343 
324 

214, 321 
214 
301 
133 
136 

214,313 

313, 343 
324 

214, 290 
340 

119,298 
330 
339 

141,217 
257 
133 
261 
340 
214,289,337 

276, 313 
330 
214 
133 
261 
322 

133, 296 
276 
330 
133 

289, 339 , 



Jourgesen, Alain 
Joyce, Michelle 
Joynes, Nicki 
Judd, Amy 
Juenger, Lara 
Juliano, Jennifer 
Jun, Angle 
Jung, Christina 
Jung, Pam 
Jung, Pamela 
Just, Chris 
Justis, Angela 



321 

214,310 

214 

214 

112 

214 

236 

214, 337 

327 

276 

290, 333 

214, 322 



KKKKK 



Kagey, Jennifer 
Kagle, Brian 
Kahlow, Aaron 
Kahn, Peter 
Kahn, Sakib 
Kaiser, Rob 
Kallas, Jennifer 
Kaminski, Jessica 
Kaminski, Joe 
Kamm, Barbara 
Kane, Jeffrey 
Kaneer, Heather 
Kankkunen, Kaarlo 
Kaplowitz, Allison 
Karam, Bernard 
Karbassi, Amir 
Karlan, Brad 
Kasten, Kevin 
Kastler, Melinda 
Katabian, Marcus 
Katz, Deborah 
Katz, Lori 
Katz, Mark 
Kauffman, Jacqueline 
Kaufman, Jeff 
Kautz, Jill 
Kawakami, Greg 
Keach, Jennifer 
Keane, Peggy 
Kearney, Shanette 
Kearns, Chris 
Keatts, Michael 
Keegan, Tricia 
Keene, Heather 
Keene, Michelle 
Keeton, Sarah 
Keffer, Kimberly 
Keffer, Stephanie 
Keister, Matt 
Keith, Patrick 
Kellard, Laura 
Keller, Julie 
Keller, Mandy 
Keller, Melanie 
Kelley, Mike 
Kelley, Rich 
Kelley, Sean 
Kelly, Kip 
Kelly, Megan 
Kelly, Sheila 
Kelsey, Tamara 
Kemmer, Susan 
Kempton, Christopher 
Kenah, T.J. 
Kendrick, Cybil 
Kennedy, Allison 
Kennedy, Julie 
Kennedy, Kristin 
Kenney, Jerry 
Kenney, Marlene 
Kenny, John 
Kenyon, Katie 
Kenyon, Kim 
Kephart, Jennifer 
Kern, Rhonda 
Kern, Richard 
Kerr, David 
Kerr, David 
Kesler, Sean 
Kettlehut, Vikki 
Kidd, Deborah 
Kidder, Adam 



324 

133 

343 

214 

333 

314 

324 

305,314 

276 

214 

214, 296 

276 

136,137,138,276 

210,214 

214, 339 

214 

293 

293 

246 

214, 340 

214, 291 

214, 324 
330 
261 

116,117 

246, 310 
67, 276 

232 
181 
313 
151 
214,314 
294, 322 
214 
324 

247, 327 
261, 305 

214 
261 
339 
214 
276 
215 
339 
288 
330 
20 
340 
157 
215 
261, 339 
215 

215, 339 
340 
261 
337 

215, 326 
261 
333 
313 
339 
217 
328 
215 
276 
301 
293 
215 
333 
187 
305 
178 



215,291 



Kilcoyne, Mallory 
Kildee, Brian 
Kilinski, Andrew 
Killian, David 
Killman, AnneCarter 
Kilmon, Cindy 
Kilpatrick, John 
Kim, Jinhee 
Kim, Lisa 
Kim, Patty 
Kim, Phil 
Kim, Teri 

Kimmitz, Christopher 
Kimrey, Jason 
Kimsey, Karen 
Kimsey, Kristie 
King, Joe 
King, John 
King, Kevin 
King, Tonya 
King, Tracy 
King, Travis 
Kinkead, Val 
Kinney, Tricia 
Kirby, Ellen 
Kirchberg, Carrie 
Kirk, Thomas 
Kirkup, Katherine 
Kish, Paula 
Kissell, Debbie 
Kitt, Michelle 
Kittrell, Kevin 
Kittrell, Kimberly 
Kitzke, Corey 
Klapac, Brian 
Klebes, Gregory 
Klein, Adam 
Klewans, Paul 
Klingel, Chris 
Klingel, Eric 
Klopotek, Cindy 
Knapp, Erin 
Knapp, Heidi 
Knick, Emily 
Knight, John 
Knight, Kimberly 
Knipsel, Lisa 
Knispel, Lisa 
Knowles, Katherine 
Kobi, Grace 
Koch, Jeffrey 
Koch, Paul ' 
Koduru, Usha 
Koeckert, Heidi 
Koenig, Jill 
Koenig, Ursula 
Koerner, Dan 
Kogle, Michelle 
Kohut, Jennifer 
Kolar, Christian 
Koogler, Brian 
Koonce, George 
Koontz, Meaghan 
Kopp, Alaine 
Koren, Sean 
Kornik, Joe 
Kornik, Joseph 
Ko5akc>wski, Kevin 
Kosciolek, Steve 
Kossman, Matthew 
Kost, Natalie 
Kostrub, Donna 
Koumarianos, Kathv 
Kraay, Cina 
Kramer, Katharine 
Kramer, Katherine 
Kratochvil, Jennifer 
Kraus, John 
Krause, Michele 
Krebs, Thomas 
Kreiger, Delores 
Kreitz, Kimberly 
Kremer, Edward 
Krepp, Trov 
Krev, Jennifer 
Krichman, Elliot 
Krick, Bethany 
Kringel, Deanna 



Index 



261 
321 
215 
215 
327 
324 
330 
299 
215 
134, 135, 160 
343 
261 
215 
330 
215 

247, 305 
305 
215 
215 
324 
247 
185 
247 

157,215 

247, 305 
339 
215 
328 
215 
322 
276 
215 

276, 337 
215 
215 
215 
291 
328 
215 
330 
215 
322 

290, 328 
276 
285 

247, 327 
322 
290 
215 
289 
124,125,216 
117 
261 
247 
117 
327 
333 
277 

216, 324 
216 
182 
216 
216 
328 

216, 328 

223, 307 

216,314 
216 
340 
288 
216 
216 
216 

216, 324 

297 

261 

82 

133 

216, 294 
257 
322 
261 
216 
216 
60 
119 
339 
277 



377 



Krop, MaK 
Krut, Robert 
Kucinskis, Jennifer 
Kudrick, Andrew 
Kugelman, Rob 
Kuhl, Heather 
Kuk, Jennifer 
Kulas, Chuck 
Kunclrs, Kelly 
Kunkle, Anne 
Kuo, Suzette 
Kupka, Kimberly 
Kupkam, Kim 
Kurian, Manju 
Kurtz, Scott 
Kusek, Kimberly 
Kutner, Alina 
Kutsch, Heidi 
Kwon, David 



LLLLL 



Labik, Michelle 
Labuguen, Nancy 
LaComb, Cheryl 
Lacy, Maureen 
Lacy, Maureen 
Lafon, Michelle 
Lagow, Chris 
Lahnstein, Carrie 
Lai, Angela 
Lakes, Suzanne 
Lally, Christine 
Lam, Michael 
Lamb, Miriam 
Lambert, C. 
Lambert, Carl 
Lambert, Clover 
Lambert, Jeremy 
LaMotte, Susan 
Lamparella, Mark 
Lancaster, Amy 
Lancelotta, Nic 
Landes, Dawn 
Landes, Dawn 
Lane, Andrew 
Lane, Ayanna 
Lane, Brian 
Lane, David 
Lane, Katherine 
Lane, Stephanie 
Langheim, Krista 
Lanouette, Scott 
Lanouette, Scott 
Lanouette, Scottt 
Lapus, Daniel 
Large, Elizabeth 
Lamer, Suzana 
LaRocco, Lori 
LaRose, Douglas 
Larout, Coach 
LaRowe, Sharon 
Larowe, Sherrie 
Larsen, Erik 
Larson, Amy 
Larson, Anna 
Larson, Chris 
Larson, Mehsa 
Larson, Stephen 
Laske, Julie 
Laske, Julie 
Lasmanis, Heidi 
Lasseigne, Todd 
Latnik, Karen 
Lattey, Suzanne 
Lausten, Elizabeth 
Laux, Nicole 
Lavere, Jeannette 
Law, Candi 
Lawing, Chris 
Lawing, Christopher 
Lawler, Christine 
Lawrence, Robert 
Lawson, Michael 
Layfield, Scott 
Layher, Michael 
Layman, Chad 



3~7Q Index 



340 


Lavman, John 


223 


Layman, Meloney 


261,327 


Layman, Meloney 


216 


Lazarchic, Tricia 


334 


Lazarchic, Tricia 


261,296,327 


Lazarus, Trish 


157 


Le, Quoc 


216 


Le, Uyen 


247 


Lea, M. 


327 


Leary, Amy 


327 


Leary, Amy 


277 


Lebowitz, Matt 


187 


Leconte, Daniel 


216,324 


Lee, C. 


216 


Lee, Christina 


328 


Lee, David 


216,291,304 


Lee, Janet 


337 


Lee, Janet 


261 


Lee, Joo 




Lee, Myung 




Lee, Tina 




Lee, Tina-Sui 




Leedom, Michael 


216,327 


Leelam, Jacob 


247, 312 


Leet, Jennifer 


262 


Legeckis, Alina 


112,294 


Lehmacher, Kirstin 


216 


Lehman, Julie 


339 


Leighton, Valerie 


330 


Leikus, Alex 


277 


LeLacheur, Jennifer 


277 


LeMay, Terri 


216 


Lemise, Kyle 


339 


Lemish, Kyle 


216 


Lemish, Mr. 


277 


Lemond, Jennifer 


262 


Lenskold, Lori 


64, 69, 224 


Lenskold, Lori 


53, 310 


Lentz, Matt 


277 


Leopold, Michael 


145 


LeSage, Kim 


334 


Letsky, Christine 


262 


Levar, Gina 


330 


Levenson, Emily 


291 


Levenson, Emily 


217 


Leventhal, David 


277 


Levine, Lori 


308 


Levitt, Eric 


217 


Lewis, Adam 


217 


Lewis, AUyson 


217 


Lewis, Ashley 


324 


Lewis, Erica 


217 


Lewis, Keri 


339 


Lewis, Kevin 


217 


Lewis, Mary 


338 


Liedtke, Cynthia 


340 


Liggett, Allison 


217 


Lightner, Richard 


159 


Liles, Christopher 


262, 327 


Linberger, Meredith 


305 


Linberger, Merideth 


147 


Lineherger, Aaron 


277 


Link, Brett 


264 


Link, Danny 


339 


Linn, Joseph 


247 


Linn, Kristine 


294, 328 


Linn, Pepi 


330 


Lionberger, Charles 


217 


Liposky, Missy 


277 


Lipp, Marcy 


291 


Lippin, Bene 


217 


Lipscomb, LaChanda 


217 


Lisack, John 


277 


Lisnyk, Amy 


217 


Liston, Kyra 


216 


Little, Allystra 


277 


Little, Alystra 


217 


Little, Andrew 


310 


Little, Bridget 


328 


Little, Gina 


291 


Littrell, Bradi 


217 


Livengood, Charles 


217 


Livingston, Donna 


247 


Livolsi, Kara 


340 


Llewellyn, Tanya 


133 


Lloyd, David 


247 


Lloyd, Sam 


147 


Locher, Christina 



53 


Lock, Jim 


312 


Lockman, Aimee 


217 


Loder, Amy 


327 


Lofquist, Jennifer 


217 


Loftin, Lisa 


181 


Logan, Steve 


262 


Loker, Christopher 


217 


Lomax, Danielle 


262 


Lombardo, Dave 


307 


Lomicky, Wayne 


217 


Londeree, Tammy 


328 


Long, Denise 


33 


Long, Kevin 


277 


Long, Mike 


,173,174 


Longacre, Derek 


133 


Longo, Eric 


321 


Loomis, Mike 


217 


Looney, Brian 


247 


Lopes, Tory 


262 


Lorkiewicz, Rob 


304 


Lotfi, Marjorie 


217 


Lotts, Beth 


247 


Lou, Kwan 


200 


Loughry, Carolyn 


277 


Louk, Tracy 


217 


Lourie, Janice 


26 


Louth, Kevin 


277 


Lovelace, Christie 


262 


Lovelace, Jessica 


333 


Loveland, Taylor 


247, 310 


Lovelidge, Jennifer 


324 


Lovering, Sharon 


143 


Lowe, Brian 


142 


Lowman, Todd 


285 


Lowrie, Lisa 


126 


Lucas, Joe 


299 


Lucas, John 


217 


Lucy, Jeffrey 


330 


Lull, Cris 


247 


Lum, Michele 


262 


Lumpkin, Morris 


316 


Lundblad, Mark 


217 


Lundy, Katherine 


306 


Luong, Xuan 


262 


Lupo, Alisa 


182 


Lupton, Christopher 


177 


Lusk, Elizabeth 


217 


Luttrell, AUyson 


278 


Lutz, Paul 


262 


Luviano, Denice 


278 


Lydic, Karlene 


298 


Lyles, Susan 


337 


Lynard, Rebekah 


217 


Lynch, Brandon 


218 


Lynch, Jackie 


278 


Lynch, Karen 


218 


Lynch, Mary 


133 


Lyon, Nathan 


262 


Lyons, Gary 


327 


K X K M 


262 


W M 


278, 337 


Vl Yl 


218 




182 


Mabrv, Monica 


122 


Macalindong, Mirraf 


247 


MacArthur, Heather 


343 


Mack, Heather 


218 


Mackert, Tammy 


186, 187 


Mackinnon, Stephen 


181 


Madden, Kaystyle 


322 


Madden, Kevin 


309 


Maddox, Corey 


146, 147 


Maddox, Sandra 


218 


Maddrea, Jean 


134 


Maddy, Shari 


327 


Magin, Colleen 


187 


Mago, Vijay 


278 


Maguire, Nora 


57,218 


Mahdalik, Alana 


145 


Maher, Brian 


262 


Mahle, Ellen 


247,333 


Mahone, Nettie 


327 


Mahoney, B.J. 


218,337 


Mai, Loi 


262 


Maier, Amy 


291 


Maimone, Lauren 


299 


Main, Anthony 


218 


Maindr, Tonya 



334 
294, 324 
218 
304 
218 
133 
296 
278 
141 

218,333 
247 

218,298 
147 
133 
328 
298 
182 
343 
278 
337 
218 
218 
310 

262,312 
305 
218 
218 
247, 289, 309 
278 
278 

291,324 

218,311 
247 
315 
247 
117 
133 
288 
182 
218 
63 
262 

278,313 
278 
112 
247 
218 

218,324 

262 

181 

112,161,218 

218,301 
262 

232, 233 
120 
218 
294 
59, 122, 247 
133 



328 

218,339 

218,327 

122 

219,299 

262 

120 

334 

337 

301 

219,291,295,296 

219 

316, 327 

343 

112,113 

219 

330 

339 

262 

133- 

219 

247 

328 

297 

248 



Majer, David 
Makris, Francie 
Malacane, Lynn 
Malekzadah, Steve 
Malik, Suleman 
Mallory, Hill 
Malls, Trina 
Maloney, John 
Malson, Chandra 
Maltese, Chris 
Mandable, Elizabeth 
Mandis, Will 
Maney, Alison 
Mangao, Kathryn 
Mangum, Melissa 
Mann, Beth 
Manning, Jessica 
Manning, Thomas 
Manning, Tracie 
Manoukian, Mikael 
Manson, Vanessa 
Manuel, Grace 
Manzo, Lisa 
Marcinkiewicz, Melanie 
Marcinko, Jennifer 
Marco, Kathleen 
Marcus, Ken 
Margaret, Scott 
Marinaccio, LeeAnne 
Marino, Gerald 
Markel, Kathleen 
Markisello, Mike 
Marknith, Steve 
Markow, Christian 
Marlett, Suzie 
Marra, Trish 
Marriott, Anne 
Marshall, Lisa 
Marshall, Mike 
Marshall, Paul 
Marshall, Shaun 
Martello, Sandra 
Martin, Amy 
Martin, Brandon 
Martin, Dana 
Martin, Jennifer 
Martin, LaTrese 
Martin, Mona 
Martin, Rodman 
Martin, Stephen 
Martin, Susan 
Martin, Taunya 
Martinez, Grisella 
Martinez, Jennifer 
Maryscuk, Lori 
Maside, David 
Maslayak, Marjorie 
Maslovs, Nikole 
Mason, Elizabeth 
Mason, Tia 
Mason, Victoria 
Massa, Roland 
Mathewson, Mark 
Matlock, Bill 
Matos, Anthony 
Matous, Nikki 
Matthews, David 
Matthews, Joe 
Matthews, Leonard 
Matthews, Leslee 
Mattingly, Catherine 
Mattingly, Lisa 
Mavor, Mary Catherine 
Mawyer, Virginia 
Maxwell, Christopher 
Maxwell, Michael 
May, Linh 
May, Shannon 
May, Thomas 
Mayall, Maggie 
Mayfield, Tiffany 
Maynard, Reo 
Mayo, Michele 
Mayo, Nancy 
Mayo, Travis 
Mays, Catherine 
Mazey, Tina 
McAdoo, Van 



136,: 



21931 

21 
25,21 

29 
140,141,21 HcDmnAi 

34 toMli.f 

26 1*mIA>' 

30 HiDomel'f 

33 icM,'' 
219,33 l*5li,t 

33 ((Btamy. 

33 IcEnleeJi 

26 

21 
119,15 

21 

13 
180,181, 24 



teillvjK 
ilcFiJdeni 
Jlcfil-K* 

KcFfflmj!' 

24 Wfattv 

32 Mmi 

219,290,32 »[Ci»,F 

263,27 UcChmS 

21' diCovBii, 

219,31: MiCradyl 

27 UA,l 



154, 15 
4 

33! 
27! 
30 
33« 



Mitn»,a 
MiHBjh,|( 



321 Mtlnftt 
15,14' Mcfett 
33,21! Us.'xs 
McKaizie, 



248, 32' 
24! 

26; 

13( XUm. 



31 
32f 

24: 

215 
29f 
33C 

21' 



219,296 
22C 
22C 

279,305 
246 
22C 
34C 
304 
313 
279 



248 
220 



Mcli«i,D 

V.'aitai, 
Milikon, 



33S Hdlilion, 
27! Mrtlfc, 



'lata; 
St\'til,C 

>'% 



22(|.Vhc^ 



248 \:,,, 
220 



siaB.I 



-:-i: 



McAfee, Katherine 
- McAveney, Megan 
•• McBride, Doran 
-' ' McCann, Dan 
-■ McCanny, Steve 
' McCarthy, Anne 
> McCarthy, Doug 
■ McCarty, Gavin 
■■ ' McCaughey, Tamara 
^f McClellan, Cherie 
McClelland, Patrick 
McCombs, Alexis 
. McConnell, Eric 
McConnell, Lara 
McConnell, Tricia 
McCord, Lisa 
J^i McCormack, Elizabeth 

McCormick, Jerry 
-' i McCormick, Molly 
McCoy, Nicole 
McCoy, Richard 
I McCracken, Jennifer 
McCrakin, Philip 
2' McCray, Brian 

McCullough, Erika 
^! McDaniel, James 
•"i! McDaniel, Tara 

McDermott, Erin 
^i McDermott, Nora 
^ McDonald, Patrick 
i I McDonald, William 
' McDonnell, Erin 
McDowell, Nicholas 
Mc El fresh, Ehren 
McElhinney, Mike 
McEntee, Julie 
McEvilly, Tracy 
McFadden, Kate 
1 McFall, Kelly 
McFarland, Kerry 
McFarling, Jennifer 
''■2^1 1 McGarvey, Lisa 

McGillicutty, Skippy 
I McGiney, Scott 
McGinnis, Paul 
! McGlynn, Brendan 
McGovern, Maureen 
i McGrady, Dina 
i McGrath, Kathryn 
McGrath, Kevin 
McGraw, Dana 
McGuffin, Channing 
McGuffin, Chris 
McGuiney, Scott 
McGuinness, John 
McHugh, John 
Mclntyre, Corey 
McKay, Chandra 
' McKee, Sarah 
McKenzie, Sean 
McKinney, Marcus 
McLaughhn, Karen 
McLaurin, Tamara 
McLean, Matthew 
McLeod, David 
McLeod, Heather 
McLeod, Keary 
McLeod, Marsha 
McLinton, Darren 
McMahon, Anne 
McMahon, Julie 
McMillan, Robynne 
McMinn, Shelly 
McMurtray, Robert 
McNaron, Tracie 
McNeill, Catherine 
McQueen, Jennifer 
McQuillan, Patrick 
McReynolds, Kara 
McSorley, Patrick 
McTernan, Joseph 
McWhirter, Arran 
McWilliams, Heidi 
Meacham, Beth 
Meade, Jennifer 
Meador, Joy 
Meadows, Laura ' 
Meekins, Brian 



^li; 



^ ■ 



220 


Meeuwissen, Heather 


263,310 


Moore, Desirea 


248 


Mehnert, Amy 


248,311 


Moore, Frederick II 


322 


Meiser, Kathy 


248 


Moore, Janet 


117 


Melroy, Lisa 


302 


Moore, Kelly 


340 


Melton, Lauren 


322 


Moore, Lee 


220,293, 294 


Melvin, Jody 


298 


Moore, Liz 


142, 143 


Melzer, Michael 


263 


Moore, Lori 


151 


Menard, Micheline 


221 


Moore, Mathhew 


279 


Menefee, Tamaika 


296 


Moore, Michele 


220 


Mengel, Steve 


298 


Moore, Natalie 


337 


Menk, Katherine 


221 


Moore, William 


288,308 


Menold, Jessica 


327 


Moorefield, Sharon 


220 


Ment, Laura 


221 


Moorman, Sheila 


220, 296 


Mercer, Todd 


185,290,294 


Morabito, Brian 


263 


Meredith, Andrea 


248,302 


Morahan, Timothy 


220 


Meredith, Andy 


302 


Moran, Craig 


263 


Meredith, David 


296, 301 


Moran, Kelly 


263, 297 


Merther, Steve 


334 


Moran, Renee 


324 


Mervyn, Swervyn 


267,314 


Moran, Ruth 


313 


Messing, Christine 


221 


Morano, Trip 


220 


Metzger, Anne 


141 


Moreau, Drew 


337 


Metzger, Jennifer 


263 


Moreland, Hallie 


339 


Metzger, Sandie 


337 


Morell, Tonia 


220,330 


Metzler, Diane 


248 


Moreno, Karla 


220,321 


Meyer, Kyle 


221,321 


Morford, Anna 


220,307 


Meyri, Kenneth 


263 


Morgan, Christy 


220 


MichaeL Jason 


50 


Morgan, Karen 


53,279 


MichaL Nicole 


248 


Morgan, Sibyl 


220,301 


Michels, Heather 


248 


Morgan, Spencer 


220 


Migliore, Katrina 


221 


Morgan, Victoria 


220 


Miles, Rhad 


133 


Morgan, Wendy 


181 


Miles, Wendy 


248 


Morlino, Susan 


220 


Miller, Amanda 


339 


Morobito, Brian 


340 


Miller, Donna-Marie 


221 


Morris, Brad 


133 


Miller, Eric 


221 


Morris, Lisa 


293, 327 


Miller, Justin 


248, 299 


Morris, Michael 


324 


Miller, Kimberly 


263,322 


Morris, Robert 


314 


Miller, Lisa 


59,263 


Morris, Shelby 


315 


Miller, Matthew 


337 


Morrison, Andrea 


248, 337 


Miller, Pamela 


221 


Morrow, Christopher 


220 


Miller, Rachel 


310 


Morse, Carol 


311 


Miller, Shauna 


308 


Morse, Chris 


339 


Miller, Shawn 


279 


Mortimer, Khristina 


161 


Miller, Tanya 


221,304 


Mosca, Jenny 


220 


Miller, Tiffany 


270,279 


Moscoso, Sandra 


279 


Miller, Todd 


221 


Moseley, Lesley 


220 


Miller, Wendi 


60,154, 155,221 


Mostiler, Ann 


221 


Mills, Dave 


122 


Motley, Nicole 


279 


Minderlein, Michele 


249, 327 


Moukas, Stacie 


263 


Minogue, Suzanne 


328 


Mountcastle, Timothy 


279 


Mintz, Rachel 


221,299 


Mowbray, Mary 


164,165 


Miranda, Steve 


314 


Moye, James 


248 


Mirmelstein, Jody 


221 


Moye, Paul 


133 


Misiano, Joanne 


280 


Moyer, Kimberly 


79,340 


Mistele, Bill 


296 


Mueller, Scott 


221,298 


Mitchell, Greg 


222,293, 299 


Muhammad, Kalias 


55 


Mitchell, Jason 


122 


Muldoon, Colleen 


158,248 


Mitchell, John 


222 


Mulholland, Frank 


221 


Mitchell, K. 


249 


Mullen, Heather 


182, 183 


Mitchell, Larry 


117 


Muller, Janice 


133 


Mitchell, Mark 


263 


Mullin, Denise 


279 


Mitchell, Mike 


117 


Mullins, Kerri 


279,313 


Mitchell, Renae 


302, 305 


Mumford, Christy 


248 


Mitchell, William 


222 


Mummau, Rob 


128, 133 


Mitschele, Casey 


222 


Mumper, Allison 


328 


Mizeras, Laura 


324 


Munafo, Lisa 


221,326 


Moayery, Shaudy 


296, 327 


Munro, Tanya 


322 


Modiri, Helen 


222 


Munzner, Ann 


165 


Moeller, Jennifer 


263 


Murphy, Amy 


279 


Moffett, Anne-Fielding 


222 


Murphy, Chris 


221 


Mohr, Sherry 


156, 157 


Murphy, Colleen 


337 


Moleno, Jacquelin 


222,294 


Murphy, Debbie 


263,294 


Mongold, Allen 


222 


Murphy, Kevin 


330 


Moniz, Jennifer 


337 


Murphy, Sharie 


221 


Monoukian, Mikael 


299 


Murphy, Thomas 


263 


Monrad, Julie 


249, 301 


Murray, Kelley 


221,310 


Monsour, Andrew 


249, 334 


Mursten, Scott 


221,296 


Montgomery, Amy 


263,30 


Musacchio, Nina 


248 


Montgomery, Barry 


333 


Muscar, James 


136, 137 


Montgomery, Chandra 


313 


Muse, Kimberly 


221 


Montgomery, Ebonee 


249 


Mussinan, Jessica 


279 


Montgomery, Ralph 


222 


Myers, Amy 


145 


Moody, Malik 


133 


Myers, Carole 


322 


Mooney, David 


263 


Myers, Donnie 


263 


Mooney, Sarah 


304 


Myers, Jennifer 


248 


Moore, Allison 


328 


Myers, Jennifer 


337 


Moore, Brian 


222 


Myers, Michael 


221 


Moore, Calista 


280 


Myers, Victor 



334 
222 
222 
222 
328 
324 
263 
304 
313 

82, 339 
311 
249 
173 

114,117 

222,339 
328 
112 
327 

112,294 
340 
280 
222,294, 301 
222 
249 

280,339 
157 
280 
280 

222,339 
222 
324 
280 
334 
133 
280 

277,340 
321 
280 
173 

222,303 
280 
182 
222 
339 

263,324 
222 
222 
263 
263 
333 
222 

270,280 

119,151,298 

222 

340 

262, 280 

222,337 
249 
249 
223 
322 
249 
42,223, 314 
115,117,126 
223, 294 
312 
223 
223 
124 
330 
322 
322 

223,339 
187 
223 
339 
299 
294 

223,340 
322 
249 
249 
263 
330 
290 
280 
249 
313 



Myrick, David 



263 



NNNNN 



Naidu, K. Kamini 


223 


Naleppa, Rachel 


20,327 


Nardone, Joe 


328, 329 


Narusis, Brian 


328 


Nash, Suanne 


223 


Nason, Leslie 


157 


Navitskis, Leonard 


264 


Neff, Laura 


223 


Nehring, Kevin 


114,117 


Nelson, Aleks 


326, 327 


Nelson, Eric 


249 


Nelson, James 


321 


Nelson, Rebecca 


327 


Nelson, Richard 


223 


Nelson, Scott 


333 


Nelson, Timothy 


223 


Nesbitt, Laura 


249, 301 


Nesselrodt, Polly 


280 


Netzer, Ryan 


280,315 


Neufeld, Eric 


339 


Neuland, Saga 


223 


New, Amanda 


280 


Newbanks, Laura 


249 


Newbold, Soon 


280 


Newcomb, Eric 


249 


Newill, Kristen 


141,223 


Newman, Jennifer 


223 


Newsome, Mark 


62 


Newsome, Stephanie 


157 


Neyer, Scott 


184, 185 


Nguyen, Amy 


223 


Nguyen, Chi 


134 


Nguyen, Nelly 


223,327 


Nguyen, Prissie 


328 


Nguyen, Steve 


299 


Nguyen, Thong 


223 


Nichols, Angela 


280 


Nichols, Ralph 


311 


Nicholson, Diana 


337 


Nickles, Jenny 


337 


Nicoletto, James 


293 


Nies, Diane 


223,294 


Nipps, Susan 


158,223 


Nixon, Stacy 


223 


Nobel, Lisa 


280 


Noboa, Aric 


223 


Noel, Timothy 


223,305 


Noon, David 


223 


Noon, Scott 


321 


Norman, Emily 


264 


Norman, Jannette 


224 


Norris, Carrie 


339 


Norris, Ginjer 


327 


Norton, James 


224,337 


Norwood, Melissa 


280 


Nunemaker, Jay 


46 


Nutschele, Casey 


337 


Nutter, Randy 


200 


Nyman, Shondra 


224 



ooooo 



O'Brien, Matt 


337 


O'Carroll, Joe 


136 


O'Connell, Chris 


333 


O'Connell, Kerri 


141 


O'Connell, Marni 


327 


O'Conner, Ann 


224 


O'Connor, Kerry 


264 


O'Connor, Meg 


328 


O'Connor, Shannon 


224 


O'Daniell, Amy 


224 


O'Daniell, Emily 


280 


O'Dell, Kelley 


280 


O'Dette, Jonathan 


264 


O'Donnell, Jennifer 


224327 


O'Drudy, Caoilfhionn 


328 


O'Hare, Todd 


330 


O'Keefe, Tom 


333 


O'Malley, Bob 


337 


O'Mara, Michael 


224 


O'Meara, Erin 


322 



Index 3T^ 



' Neal, Shaur 
O'N'fil. Hcalher 
O'Neill, Brady 
O'S'illivan. Karen 
O'Sullivan. Kristin 
Oaklander, Alycia 
Obeck, Amy 
Obcrst, Dr.Bethany 
Obias, Vincent 
Oelrich, Regina 
Ogli\'ie, Mike 
Oh, Sung 
Oldham, Heather 
Olech, Deana 
Olcnick. Mary 
Olesch, Emily 
Oliver, Jeffrey 
Oliver, Shelley 
Oliver, Timothy 
Olse, Jeremy 
Olson, Joe 
Onuska, Mike 
Opdyke, Steven 
Oravec, Scott 
Ordakovvski, Amy 
Orendorff, Kris 
Organic, Caryn 
Orringer. Kristy 
Osborne. Ellen 
Oswald, Karen 
Ouellette, Kathrvn 
Owen, Jennifer 



280 

314, 324 

143 

337 

324 

327 

337 

285 

224 

262, 33') 

124, 126,249,304 

224 

324 

264 

249 

81,303 

249,305 

224,304 

224 

136 

316 

184, 185 

224 

224 

328 

133 

327 

224,291,327 

327 

224 

249 

324, 327 



PPPPP 



Pack, Christopher 
Pafford, Sandra 
Page. Jonathan 
Page. Lori 
Pall, Jenessa 
Painter, Michael 
Pakidis, Paulene 
Palladinetti, Laura 
Palmer, Jeannie 
Palmer, Matthew 
Palmer. Michael 
Palmquist, Tracey 
Palocsay, Susan 
Pappanastos, Greg 
Parcell. Linettc 
Pardue, Anya 
Parekh, Ketan 
Parisi, Bob 
Park, Hae-Jung 
Parker, Cecilia 
Parker, Jennifer 
Parker, Robin 
Parker, Shante 

Parks, Heather 

Parr, Donna 

Parrish, Jennifer 

Parrish, Shane 

Parrott, Chris 

Parsons, Emily-Marie 

Parsons, Jason 

Parsons, Michael 

Pascual, Mona 

Pasicznyk, Paula 

Pasquantino, Denise 

Passerini, Joseph 

Passmore, Tina 

Pastemack, Aaron 

Patharkar, Osric 

Patrick, Donna 

Patrick, Kimberly 

Patrick, Robert 

Patterson, Br\an 

Patton, Mark 

Paul, Adam 

PauUno. Melissa 

Paxton, Ida 

Paxton, Suzanne 

Payne, Beth 

Payne, Cindy 

Payne, Donnetta 

Payne, Elizabeth 

Payne, Kerry 

Payne, Lisa 



380 Index 



337 
312 
324 
224,310 
244 
224 
224,301,328 
224 
264,311 
224 
224 
224 
296 
122, 343 
224 
337 
296 
330 
264 
224 
83 
225 
308 
244 
225,294, 302 
225 
249 
132,133 
327 
249 
249 
225,339 
225 
327 
280 
225,301 
225 
280 
225 
225 
225,333 
280,313 
178 
328 
225 
264 
304 
337 
225,291, 327 
281 
225 
264 
225 



Pazdera, Clint 
Peake, Emily 
Peddicord, Blake 
Pedigo, Claire 
Peebeles. lake 
Peebles. Richard 
Pcgher. lamic 
Peko, Wendy 
Pell, Laura 
Pence, Kerry 
Pendleton, Cynthia 
Pendleton, Dawn 
Penn, Laurice 
Pcnner, Courtney 
Penney, Lori 
Penning, Marnie 
Pennington. Brad 
Pepin. Daniel 
Perault. Perry 
Perdue, Anthony 
Perkins, Earl 
Perkins, Jill 
Perkins, Shelia 
Perret. Anthony 
Perrie, Janet 
Perrine, Eleanor 
Perry, Karen 
Persons, Timothy 
Pet, Dennis 
Peterson. April 
Peterson, Brent 
Peterson, Darrell 
Peterson, Jenna 
Peterson, Jennifer 
Peterson, Kathryn 
Peterson. Marcia 
Peterson, Martha 
Peterson. Robert 
Peterson, Richie 
Peterson, Susie 
Petrille. Lisa 
Pettit, George 
Pettit, Sarah 
Petty, Nicole 
Petze, Alexandra 
Pfautz, Michael 
Phalen, Colleen 
Phelps, Carmen 
Phelps, Donald 
Philippi, Stacy 
Phillips, Amy 
Phillips, Bobby 
Phillips, Brandy 
Phillips, Cosette 
Phillips, Jennifer 
Phillips. Kristen 
Phillips, Rachel 
Phillips. Ryan 
Phillips, Teresa 
Phoebus. Brian 
Phung, Hueminh 
Pickering, Felicia 
Pickering, Michael 
Pickett, Rebecca 
Pickles, Michael 
Pieper, Erich 
Pierce, Caryn 
Pierce, Kimberly 
Pikul, Lynette 
Pilch, Jennifer 
Pillion, Jon 
Pillsbury, Mark 
Pineda, Jon 
Pino, Angela 
Piorkowski, Katie 
Pittard, Betsey 
Pittman, Tina 
Pitts, Rosalyn 
Pizzurro, Susie 
Pizzurro, Suzie 
Plocek, Jennifer 
Policicchio, Kristen 
Policicchio, Michael 
Poliquin, Melissa 
Polopnick, Karen 
Ponn, Ward 
Popham, Stephanie 
Porieth, Mark 
Porter, Jeremy 
Porter, Kerry 



311 
249, 304 
250,315 
264 
343 
225 
264 
264 
251) 
291 
225,290 
225 
225 
225 
281 
95 
337 
304 
225 
343 
80 
264 
225 
133 
281,322 
225 
225,305 
225 
303, 304 
264 
250, 304 
313 
337 
226 
226 
264 
226 
226 
226 
322 
328 
226 
250 
226 
226 
226,339 
322 
226 
133,226 
226,298 
226 
330 
58 
328 
265,327 
265,324 
298 
270 
226,137 
146, 147 
265 
281 
226 
265 
265,291 
226 
134 
225 
250 
265,327 
136 
226 
30, 204 
210 
148, 149 
322 
226,313,321 
321 
141 
158 
265 
339 
339 
226,307 
280 
298 
33,226, 301 
70 
281 
281 



Porter, Suzy 
Post, Kristen 
Potanka, Cindy 
Potter, Jordan 
Pouchet, Dara 
Powell, Andrea 
Powell, Caryn 
Powell, C'hristopher 
Powell, Danielle 
Powell, Mike 
Power, Christv 
Powers, Carolyn 
Powers, Jenn 
Pozniak, Mark 
Pozzolini, Gian 
Pratt, Sarah 
Preacher, Brent 
Prebish, Theresa 
Prem, Mike 
Prendergast, Mark 
Presnick, Stacy 

Preston, Christina 

Preston, Doug 

Preusser, Matthew 

Price, Allison 

Price, Cindy 

Price, Pete 

Prichett. Christina 

Prickett. Molly 

Prince, Debbi 

Pritchett, Christina 

Pritchett, Jennifer 

Proost, Carrie 

Propst, Michelle 

Prosel, Karen 

Prucha, Jennifer 

Prudin, Lynn 

Prunty, Benjamin 

Puckett. Andrew 

Puckett, Kathryn 

Puckett, Toni 

Pugh, Beth 

Pukerson. Jennifer 

Puleo, Gina 

Puller, Andrew 

Pursell, Christopher 



328 
281 
265 
333 
265,337 
226 
226,324 
343 
172,173 
178 
145 
226,296 
324 
226 
178 
250 
330 
120, 153, 160, 297 
281 
226 
295, 296 
124,125 
296 
227 
227 
120, 153 
330 
227 
227,301 
154,155 
313 
227,327 
140, 141 
265 
327 
227 
295,296 
311 
124,227 
227 
227,324 
227,301 
227 
327 
227 
227 



00000 



Quattlebaum. David 
Quick, Brian 
Quick, Doug 
Quick, Janice 
Quinlan, Neil 
Quinn. David 
Quinn, Heather 
Quinn, Laura 



133 
304 
333 
211,250 
321 
165 
328 
265 



RRRRR 



Radcliffe, Kevin 


293 


Radick, Bridges 


337 


Radoski, Derek 


133 


Rae, Jeffery 


227 


Rafii, Dar 


340 


Ragsdale, Donna 


250,291,305,314 


Rahming, Marcia 


227 


Raiford, Wendy 


227 


Railey, Ste\-en 


265 


Raine, Rebecca 


327 


Rakowski, Samantha 


227 


Rametta, Thomas 


340 


Ramey, Michael 


227 


Ramos, Anna 


265 


Ramos, Manlvn 


227,304 


Ramsay, Karen 


328 


Ramsey, Coleen 


227 


Ramsey, David 


227 


Ramsey, Kristen 


281 


Ramsey, Scott 


265 


Rand, Adam 


340 


Randolph, Wilson 


227,324 


Ranere, Renee 


157 


Raplee, Tamie 


227 


Rascoe, H.S. 


265 


Rathke. Mark 


227 


Ratliff, Aimee 


322 



Ratliff, Kara 
Ranch. Kirsta 
Rawiey, Mona 
Rawlins, Brad 
Ray, Lee 
Rayfield, Robert 
Rayfield, Stephanie 
Raymond, Steven 
Reader, Patricia 
Readv, Jennifer 
Rebich, Christina 
Record, Ian 
Redburn, Wang 
Redmond, Laura 
Redpath, Annamarie 
Reeb, Kevin 
Reeb, Michael 
Reed, Diane 
Reed, Jennifer 
Reed, Leslie 
Reed, Lydia 
Reed, Mason 
Reeder, Russ 
Reedy, Jennifer 
Reeni, Deborah 
Reese, Sandy 
Reffner, Corey 
Regetz, Suzann 
Reichardt, Tracy 
Reichers, Pam 
Reid, Amy 
Reid, Blake 
Reid, Cathy 
Reid, Donna 
Reid, Erica 
Reid, Laurie 
Reillv, Stacey 
Reinhold, Tori 
Relan, Dina 
Remy, Andrea 
Renauld, Amy 
Reynolds, K. Scott 
Reynolds, Richard 
Restivo, Steven 
Rettig, Erin 
Reule, Julie 
Reynolds, Angle 
Reynolds, Gary 
Reynolds, Cynthia 
Reynolds, Dena 
Reynolds, James II 
Reynolds, Jason 
Reynolds, Sarah 
Reynolds, Scott 
Rhinehart, Rhonda 
Rhode, Melanie 
Rhodes, Vincent 
Rhodv, Jason 
Rhudy, Jonathan 
Rhynerson, Liz 
Ricci, Serena 
Ricciardi, Matt 
Riccobono, Andrew 
Rice, Tracey 
Rich, Stephanie 
Richards, Chris 
Richardson, Christopher 
Richardson, Cristina 
Richardson, Diane 
Richardson, Dione 
Richerson, Deborah 
Richmond, Daegal 
Riddel, Leslie 
Riddick, Alice 
Riddle, Wayne 
Ries, Michelle 
Riesett, Scott 
Riley, Amy 
Rilev, Shane 
Rinehart, Tammy 
Ringdahl, Sara 
Risclli, Michele 
Ritchie, Amy 
Ritchie, Steven 
Rittcr, Clayton 
Ritter, Patricia 
Rivers, Katie 
Rivers, Thomas 
Roach, Danielle 
Roach, Elizabeth 



I,: I* 
It (M 



^if-.rbOIli 



171,173,1/ 

228,258, 25 

22 

3C 

298, 31 

22 

228,33 

228,34 

28 

22 

250,301,31 

22 

34 

22 

22 

33 

33 

22 t(«ii-«i' 

266,291,32 *"-*' 

22 ^i^^ ^ 
33i |)tiwn,f 

134,135,22; *»"■'' 

251 jHnson.^ 

331 ^x^} 

ly )biii'on,^ 

26i Win*'' 

28 (tiM«,f 

32 i)tiB)aT 

221 i)ik',E'" 

228,30- oiil* 

141,22! K""'* 

228,29' *'''^' 

301,31; kH^' 

32; ft^'tJ™ 

26( lo;i'>.W" 

29( lo-;i^.Lon 

26( to'^* 

281 if;«l* 

22f ObU* 

22f «*** 

22f olliftCiei 

321 oIk.Wif 

26( oltn.Mj 

14] (iM,Ale' 

192 Miw.Sha 

250,33/ mjx.fa 

22f ooilJ.loiii 

281 om |em' 

22! ItvM Ijso 

133 m\M 

22i ln~r.Ilfa 

192 iB-.Di.Un 

22s tenKr»E 

22f Mta.S 

229,31^ Kidv.Cin 

30J mM 

266 m.lmk 

339 Binsim 

229,293,294 BsAlifc 

133 m\kkt 

229 (ismiii 

301 olj.biiila 

229 lUGnjon 

330 DKUvki 

229 oabod.Chi 

229 o.ff,,(«(, 

229 :ohr, 
313 
229 

229,343 
339 

229,301 



w 

»«t, loiiis 

0«t\li|t 

"ifiJemil 



229 (fcijpJdd 



229 
229,321 



'VUirey 



266,312 oaiDif:-. 
229 WW 



229,294 
337 
229 
281 
281 
163,165,166 
120 
266 
229,324 
324 
327 



>Ibj 

'htm 

««%Ent 
'>*»!.Cla,| 



' Roach, Michele 
-■' Roach, William 
J Roalf, Colefta 

Rob, Grace 
- Robblee, Clay 
Roberts, Bradford 
Roberts. Philip 
Roberts, Roberta 
Robertson, Eugene 
Robertson, Matt 
i Pobeson, Jeannie 
3 pobie, Catherine 
Robilotta, Brian 
Robinette, lulie 
Robinson, Amy 
Robinson, Andrea 
Robinson, Angela 
Robinson, Brian 
Robinson, Daniel 
Robinson, Dwight 
Robinson, Elizabeth 
Robinson, Hunter 
Robinson, Kareem 
Robinson, Katherine 
Robinson, Maria 
Robinson, Mark 
Robinson, Martika 
Robinson, Nicole 
Robinson, Pattm 
Robinson, Tosha 
Roche, Erin 
Rodal, lohn 
J Rodnev, Shannon 
■-. Roeber, Danielle 
Roehrig, Kimberlv 
Roets, Karen 
Rogers, John 
Rogers, Lori 
Rogers, Mike 
Rogol, Babette 
;> Roish, Melinda 
Roish, Melissa 
Rollins, Gregory 
Roils, Jodie 
Rollston, Matthew 
Roman, ,'\le\ander 
Romine, Sharon 
Romjue, Kristin 
Ronald, Kimberly 
Ronev, Jerry 
;> Roonev, Jason 
Rooney, Paul 
:> Roose, Tiffany 

Rose, Dr. Linwood 
;> Rosenberg, Eric 
3 Rosenblatt, Bonnie 
Rosickv, Carrie 
Rosner, Matt 
Ross, Jonathan 
Ross, Kristen 
Ross, Matthew 
Ross, Michael 
Rossmann, Brian 
Rota, Jennifer 
Roth, Gregory 
Rouck, William 
Rouland, Christine 
Rox'ers, Scott 
Rowe, Beyerly 
Rowe, jeryl 
Rowe, Karen 
Rowe, Louis 
Rowe, Matt 
Rowen, Jennifer 
Rowland, Richard 
Roy, Corey 
Ro/nian, Mike 
Rozum, Kristin 
Ruark, Michelle 
Rubano, Alex 
Rubin, Alisa 
Ruble, Christopher 
Rucker, Samuel 
Rudin, Kerri 
Rufo, Justin 
Ruggiero, Jen 
Rule, Karen 
Runnells, Cynthis 
Running, Eric 
Rushing, Charles 



229 

229,293 

266 

82 

337 

229 

250 

266 

315 

330 

339 

55,229 

266,328 

229 

181 

298 

250,313 

229 

204 

133 

293, 328 

305 

164,165,167,196 

112 

229^13, 321 

324 

313 

250 

229,299, 322 

230,313 

78, 267 

230 

266 

310 

230,328 

266,304 

117, 192,230,316 

322 

340 

266 

281 

230,328 

340 

266 

230 

230 

328 

230 

250,307 

118,119 

133 

340 

311 

285 

333 

250, 293, 306 

230 

330 

314 

281 

250 

230 

330 

230,290 

178,230 

230 

230 

296 

230 

230 

267 

165 

147 

240,293 

178,281 

133 

340 

230 

230,337 

33, 23! 

240 

230 

324 

337 

330 

157 

250 

337 

340 

267 



Rusthoyen, Jennifer 
Ruzicka, Rich 
Ryan, Dan 
Ryan, Kristen 
Rylands, Krisha 



ssss 



Sabin, Brett 
Sabold, AJ. 
Sacco, Jennifer 
Sadoff, Leslie 
Saks, Aaron 
Salamy, Timothv 
Salinky, Matt 
Salins, Lori 
Sampson, Ivan 
Sampson, Steven 
Samuel, James 
Samuels, DeHavilland 
Sandhofer, John 
Sandhu, Rasdeep 
Sands, Rob\'n 
San ford. Jay 
Sanne, Matt 
Santos, Troyhann 
Sargent, Christy 
Sarner, Michael 
Satchell, Duncan 
Satre, Allison 
Saunders, Couri 
Savage, Christie 
Savich, Beverly 
Sawyer, Leesa 
Scanlon, Kevin 
Scarsella, Carlv 
Scattergood, Carrie 
Schaefer, Bridget 
Schaeter, Rob 
Schaeffer, Jennifer 
Schaffner, Paul 
Scharenbrock, Kimberly 
Scharpf, Rob 
Schatmever, Simon 
Schatteles, Teresa 
Schebe, Debbie 
Schechter, Elyse 
Scheel, Dan 
Schein, Stephen 
Scherer, Rip 
Scheuble, Kristen 
Scheuerle, Anne 
Schiele, Erika 
Schilken, Karen 
Schilling, Christine 
Schilpp, Craig 
Schlemmer, Kim 
Schlesinger, Jon 
Schloss, Lauren 
Schmidt, Anja 
Schmitt, Cynthia 
Schmitt, Nicolette 
Schmitz, Patti 
Schneider, Kristina 
Schneider, Mark 
Schoemann, Alison 
Schoenfeld, Ryan 
Schoka, Elaine 
Scholten, Brookie 
Schoolev, Robin 
Schreib, Sarah 
Schreiber, Brande 
Schuh, Janel 
Schulstad, Karen 
Schulte, Suzanne 
Schultz, Melissa 
Schultze, Suzanne 
Schum, Jeffrey 
Schumacher, Erin 
Schuster, Jennifer 
Schutta, Elizabeth 
Schutta, Mary 
Schutz, Chris 
Schuyler, Wendy 
Schwab, Kara 
Schwab, Steve 
Schwabel, Matthew 
Schwandt, Chantel 



230 


Schwartz, Craig 


333 


Schwartz, Jason 


184, 185 


Schwarz, Jeremy 


294 


Schwatka, Jennifer 


230 


Schweisguth, Allison 


^s 


Schweisthal, Danielle 


^ 


Sciallis, Gabe 


J 


Sclar, Robyn 




Scott, Becky 


78, 307 


Scott, Brian 


327 


Scott, Cindy 


230 


Scott, Dr. Robert 


267 


Sampson, Ralph 


20 


Scott, James 


299 


Scott, jenni 


333 


Scott, Kelly 


267 


Scott, Mike 


36, 137, 138 


Scott, Rebecca 


339 


Scott, Sharon 


127,147,230 


Scott, Sheena 


267 


Sco\'ille, Karyn 


230 


Scranton, Stephen 


267 


Scudder, William 


230 


Scully, Cheryl 


330 


Scwabel, Matt 


330 


Seal, Gregory 


231 


Searls, Heather 


231 


Secrest, Scott 


250,291 


Secrist, Brent 


136 


See, Ben 


231,301 


Seegars, Chad 


267,324 


Seeley, John 


328 


Seely, Joshua 


250 


Segermark, Karen 


267, 304 


Seidclman, Maria 


151 


Seider, Greg 


337 


Seidnitzer, Susan 


231,301 


Selario, Tara 


267 


Selden, Anna 


64 


Self, Chris 


231 


Selignian, Erica 


146 


Sellin, Erik 


327 


Senatore, Brian 


290,333 


Setlow, Darren 


74 


Sevton, Helen 


231,312 


Shackelford, Keyin 


71 


Shackelford, Kristi 


231 


Shaffer, Jennifer 


333 


Shaffer, Matt 


231 


Shaker, Marcus 


133 


Shaker, Matt 


231 


Shakesby, Jennifer 


231 


Shanahan, Patti 


231 


Shaner, Alison 


281 


Shapiro, Marsi 


181 


Sharp, Susan 


267 


Sharpe, Richard 


120 


Sharper, Monica 


151 


Sharrocks, Kristin 


231 


Shaub, Walter Jr. 


231 


Shaw, Amanda 


267,306 


Shea, Dan 


231, 299 


Shea, Julie 


322 


Sheehan, Catherine 


231 


Sheikh, Khvirsha 


231,297 


Shelby, Joseph 


281 


Shell,Heather 


267 


Shelly, Gail 


19,231 


Shelor, Wiley 


314 


Shelton, Wayne 


231 


Sheperd, Laura 


173 


Shepherd, Tavy 


328 


Sheppard, Angela 


231,293 


Sheppard, Viveca 


141,231 


Sherman, Eric 


290, 328 


Sherman, Laura 


327 


Sherman, Neil 


231 


Sherman, Whitney 


295 


Sherwood, Keith 


250 


Shields, Ronnie 


250 


Shifflett, Amber 


231 


Shiflett, Dana 


281,327 


Shippie, Heather 


178 


Shoemaker, Julia 


231,322 


Shoka, Elaine 


311 


Shore, Kim 


96 


Showalter, Trad 


41,250 ^ 


Shriner, Hunter 


141 


f Shrum, Sandra 




Shuford, Rebecca 



231 


Shuman, Rick 


232 


333 


Shurr, Dana 


281 


298 


Shyne, Maurisa 


251,291 


34 


Sieberkrob, Amy 


134,268 


250, 310 


Siegfried, Joe 


133 


27 


Siemon, Wendy 


224 


340 


Siewers, Michael 


290, 291, 295, 338, 339 


324 


Signorelli, James 


281 


327 


Sikora, Loren 


327 


251 


Sikora, Loren 


232 


48,117,231,316 


Simmons, Jenny 


181 


285 


Simmons, Keyin 


251 


165,168,169 


Simmons, Tiffany 


282 


288 


Simon, Dondi 


343 


267 


Simoniz, Jill 


233 


232 


Simpson, Cheree 


233 


330 


Simpson, Christopher 


233,298 


232 


Simpson, Julie 


322 


232,311 


Simpson, Katherine 


233 


334 


Simpson, Michelle 


233 


232,337 


Sims, Jennifer 


301,327 


232 


Sims, KeUy 


282 


177732 


Sims, Kenny 


37, 128, 133 


322 


Sims, Victoria 


251,294 


314 


Sincarage, Jennifer 


282 


232 


Singer, Jaye 


301 


232 


Singer, Robert 


47,233,337 


304 


Singleton, Angela 


233 


133 


Sisk, Kevin 


97 


201 


Sisler, William 


268 


178 


Sitteard, Nadine 


321 


185 


Sizemore, Cynthia 


337 


251 


Skalinski, Jeff 


293 


267 


Skasko, Melissa 


154, 251 


251 


Slagle, Denise 


233 


330 


Slatee, James 


233 


267 


Slater, Brady 


294 


232 


Slaughter, Kara 


233 


232, 301 


Sleighter, Shane 


233 


291 


Sle\'in, Frank 


330 


324 


Slevin, Jenny 


339 


268,315 


Sligh, Steve 


343 


268,296 


Slonaker, Chris 


117,126,334 


95 


Slonaker, Kathryn 


268,337 


328 


Slot, Anna-Marie 


233,296 


268 


Smart, Robert 


132, 133 


240,316 


Smedley, Scott 


233,330 


232293, 


Smith, Allison 


233,322 


41 


Smith, Andrea 


233 


337 


Smith, Becky 


233 


337 


Smith, Brian 


233 


337 


Smith, Cameron 


328 


322 


Smith, Carol 


233 


232 


Smith, Cassidy 


337 


232 


Smith, Charles 


334 


251 


Smith, Chrissie 


298 


251 


Smith, Christina 


304 


232,304 


Smith, Christine 


233 


232 


Smith, Christy 


304 


232 


Smith, Corey 


301 


322 


Smith, Darian 


149 


330 


Smith, Dawn 


308 


181 


Smith, Diron 


251 


100,232, 337 


Smith, Doug 


305 


268 


Smith, Elizabeth 


251 


232 


Smith, Emily 


251, 327 


324 


Smith, Geoff 


330, 331 


170,173,174 


Smith, Gerald 


133 


232,322 


Smith, Heather 


233 


268 


Smith, Jennifer 


233,294 


232 


Smith, Joe 


85 


322 


Smith, Jon 


76 


268 


Smith, Laurie 


233,299 


232,293 


Smith, Leslie 


233 


333 


Smith. Marcy 


233 


232 


Smith, Marlin 


43 


291 


Smith, Marshall 


151 


281 


Smith, Matt 


133 


232 


Smith, Melisa 


268,291 


298 


Smith, Mike 


136, 182 


281 


Smith, Morgan 


196 


322 


Smith, Pete 


182 


322 


Smith, Shannon 


234 


251 


Smith, Steve 


268 


304 


Smith, Suzanne 


298 


328 


Smith, Trisha 


337 


299 


Smith, Vincent 


234 


268,337 


Smith., Morgan 


134 


301 


Smithley, Katherine 


305 


232,294,337 


Smoker, Danelle 


268 



Index jO[ 



Smola, Krislen 


327 


Smullen, Bill 


343 


SmuUen, William 


234 


Snyder, Joanna 


234,322 


Snyder, Kirk 


321 


Sobieray, John 


268 


Solomon, Matt 


343 


Soncini, Gabby 


93 


Song, James 


304 


Song, Jeong 


234 


Sormichsen, Jennifer 


234 


Soon, Pek 


288, 326, 327 


Sorrell, Mary 


234 


Southall, Pat 


86 


Southard, David 


334 


Souza, Mario 


224,234 


Sowers, Christian 


340 


Spangler, Derek 


133,234 


Spangler, Sarah 


234 


Spannaus, Andrew 


234 


Sparadno, Frank 


298 


Speca, Kirsten 


268 


Speights, Juli 


120,152,153,161 


Speiss, Thomas 


234,293 


Spelbring, Chris 


330 


Spence, Sheri 


282 


Spencer, Amy 


339 


Spencer, Marcia 


234 


Spencer, Michael 


234,299, 324 


Spenik, Christina 


328 


Spensieri, Daniel 


234 


Sperberg, Theresa 


282 


Sphar, Michael 


251 


Spitzer, Jeramy 


268 


Spivey, Stacy 


234,299 


Spradlin, Scott 


234 


Springer, Sean 


234 


Sprissler, Ethan 


268 


Squaires, Sherry 


157 


Srskic, Tammy 


322 


St.Germain, Catherine 


234 


Stafford, Brandy 


141 


Stafford, Lori 


322 


Staggers, Maria 


234 


Stamper, John 


251,330 


Stancil, Sherry 


327 


Stanek, Frankie 


182,340 


Stanford, Paul 


250 


Stanley, Beth 


322 


Stansbur>', Matt 


178 


Stanton, Dan 


290 


Stantos, Troyhann 


112 


Starkey, Christy 


328 


Starkey, Jennifer 


234 


Starr, Karin 


224,234, 327 


Staska, Julie 


337 


Stefan, Melissa 


181 


Stefan, Michelle 


181 


Stefanko, Kelly 


251 


Steger, Craig 


340 


Stein, John 


133 


Steinle, Richard 


234 


Steistom, Paul 


70 


Stensby-Hurst, Nina 


26 


Stephens, Jill 


234 


Stephens, Wendy 


293 


Sterbenz, Sonya 


268 


SterUng, Jason 


333 


Stem, Ellen 


234 


Sternberg, Jennifer 


154,268,339 


Stevens, Alicia 


251 


Stevens, Carlton 


235 


Stevens, Cliff 


330 


Stevens, Justine 


322 


Stevens, Kristen 


268 


Stevens, Melissa 


235,327 


Stewart, Dave 


133 


Stewart, Jodi 


310 


Stewart, Kevin 


340 


Stewart, Pam 


157 


Stewart, Tracy 


235 


Stewart, Yolanda 


291, 321 


Stiff, Bertram 


251 


Stiles, Robert 


299 


SKIlwell, Mike 


282 


Stimpson, Jennifer 


268,327 


Stock, Dave 


330 


Stock, Jody 


337 


Stoker, Tara 


327 


Stolte, Deanne 


337 



Stolzfus, Gwen 
Stone, Amy 
Stone, Jennifer 
Stone, Lesley 
Stone, Melanie 
Stone, Melissa 
Stone, Randy 
Storch, Joseph 
Storck, Meredith 
Stouffer, Rachel 
Stough, Michelle 
Stover, Katie 
Strahley, Richard 
Strane, Melvin 
Strange, Stuart 
Strasser, Andrew 
Stratton, Kim 
Straub, Adrienne 
Straub, Christopher 
Strauss, Eric 
Strayton, Daniel 
Streckfuss, Kurt 
Strehlow, Brian 
Streiff, Bridgett 
Streit, Jennifer 
Strother, Jocelyn 
Strottman, Lori 
Stuart, Kimberley 
Stucki, Koren 
Studivant, Veleka 
Studwell, Patti 
Stup, Christopher 
Sturges, Megan 
Sturr, Timothy 
Styerbenz, Sonya 
Su, Alice 
Sugar, Anne 
Suguitan, Leru 
Suit, Robert 
Suko, Reid 
Sulg, Krista 
Sullivan, Annemarie 
Sullivan, Chris 
Sullivan, Kelly 
Sullivan, Leigh 
Summers, Sherry 
Sumnick, Michala 
Sun, Jenny 
Sun, Marvin 
Sunderland, Beth 
Suril, Christopher 
Surovell, Scott 
Susil, Chris 
Sutherland, Ramon 
Sutter, Nicole 
Sutton, Rob 
Swancott, Carol 
Swanson, Dedreama 
Swartout, Kristen 
Swartwood, Carol 
Swartz, Jennifer 
Swartz, Kent 
Swecker, Lisa 
Sweeney, Doug 
Swennes, Kay 
Swenson, Stacy 
Swenton, Alison 
Swenton, Alison 
Swope, James 
Swords, Kyle 
Sydnor, Andy 
Sysko, Rebecca 
Szeto, Edwin 
Szlachianshyn, Lisa 



157 
261 

66, 235 
327 

282,305 

282,305 
340 
321 
282 
251 
327 
322 
268 

235,324 

235 

16,235 

301 

282 

119,151,235 

295, 333 
235 
235 
235 

235,324 
268 
235 

141,268 
235 
235 
235,291,308 
307 
235 
268 
296 
328 
298 
235 
122 
235 
182 
112 
235 
133 
327 

282,328 
173 
235 
269 
235 
337 
251 
339 
296 
324 

235,322 
333 
251 
235 
282 
235 
282 
236 
236 
282 
282 

236,327 
294, 298, 322 
236 
334 
136 
340 
282 

236,296 

269,327 



TTTTT 



Tahboub, Samer 
Talbert, Kimberly 
Talbot, Andrea 
Talbot, Sheena 
Tallent, Melissa 
Talley, Vernon 
Tapp, Kevin 
Target, Marci 
Tarkington, Laurie Anne 
Taroy, Vincent 
Tatum, Tanya 



236 
236 
236,288 
236 
181 
236 
236 
328 
236 
236 
313 



Tavenner, Julie 
Taylor, Alveeta 
Taylor, Amy 120, 

Taylor, Brooke 
Taylor, Bryan 
Taylor, Camellia 
Taylor, James 
Taylor, Jeff 
Taylor, Jennifer 
Taylor, Leigh 
Taylor, Leslie 
Taylor, Lionel 
Taylor, Melinda 
Taylor, Molly 
Taylor, Rochelle 
Tempchin, Alane 
Temple, Tonya 
Tennant, Hillary 
Terry, Staci 
Thai, Christina 
Theisen, Keith 
Theriot, Tyler 
Thierbach, Carolyn 
Thiltgen, Therese 
Thomas, Daron 
Thomas, David 
Thomas, Jay 
Thomas, Jim 
Thomas, John 
Thomas, Rikki 
Thomas, Susan 
Thomasson, Patricia 
Thompkins, James 
Thompson, Ben 
Thompson, Jeff 
Thompson, Jenna 
Thompson, Leslie 
Thompson, Naceema 
Thompson, Stephanie 
Thompson, Suzanne 
Thompson, Toya 
Thome, Barbara 
Thome, Caralisa 
Thome, Robert 
Thorne, Shannon 
Thomhill, Arnold 
Thrift, Deborah 
Thurman, Chris 
Thurston, Jill 
Thurston, Mark 
Tice, Amy 
Tickle, Russ 
Tierney, Heather 
Tilghman, Kerri 
Tillery, Megan 
Tilman, Bill 
Tine, Paul 
Tinsley, Tara 
Tipton, Mary Ann 
Tisinger, Carmen 
Toben, Jen 
Tock, Julia 
Todd, Jeff 
Toewe, Susan 
Toffenetti, Elaine 
Tomasello, Donna 
Tomlin, Kelly 
Tongue, James 
Toomer, Robert 
Torman, Adam 
Torry, Che 
Toth, Charles 
Towe, Susan 
Towers, Adrienne 
Townes, D'Artagnan 
Townsend, Sasha 
Towry, Kim 
Toy, Renee 
Tragakis, Stephanie 
Trasatti, Gabe 
Travers, Kate 
Travitz, Victoria 
Traylor, Chelsea 
Trent, Cheryl 
Trent, Nancy 
Tribble, Christopher 
Trible, Mary Kay 
Triolet, Chad 
Troiano, William 
Troilo, Jason 



236 

251,313 

152, 153, 236,294, 301 

322 

236 

251,309 

251 

178, 179 

236,327 
269 
236 
236 

236,310 
322 
236 
251 
269 
236 
236 

282,328 
321 
236 
282 
337 
313 

236,293 

119,151 
46 
133 
282 
237 
269 
340 
330 

119,151 
324 
339 
309 

252, 253 

237,327 
237 

252, 253 
122, 123, 237 
343 
309 
295 
237 
133 
269 

119,237 

157 

298 

237,288, 305 

252, 253 
282 
343 
333 

237,334 

237 

237 

11,70,258 

237,289, 293, 339 

136, 343 
269 
305 
237 
237,291,295,327 
282 

252, 253 
340 
122 
133 
298 
324 
133 
337 
322 
282 

244, 288 

296 

237,316,327 

237 

237,299 
269' 
237 
237 

295,298 

178,321 
237 

117,126 



Tropca, Mark 
Trott, Edgar 
Trout, Douglas 
Trout, Edward 
Trumpy, Valory 
Tsuchitani, Ben 
Tuberty, Patricia 
Tucillo, Jill 
Tucker, Kevin 
Tucker, Scott 
Tuckman, Lois 
Tufts, Kimberly 
Turnbow, Heather 
Turner, Archie 
Turpin, Michele 
Tutt, Kishia 
Tyler, David 
Tyler, Wanda 
Tynes, Tracey 
Tyree, Cynthia 



33. 
211 
23; 
23: 
23! 
269331 
28; 
23: 
33' 

33: 

27. 

141,23; 

252,25; 
3(V 

252, 25: 
30- 
17i 
28: 
33- 
23: 



uuuuu 



Uglialoro, Joseph 
Underwood, Robn 
Upson, Leslie 
Uram, Jennifer 



23! 
26* 
231 
32J 



vvvvv 



Vahedian, Torey 
Van Dam, Steve 
Vance, Renae 
VanCleef, Gwendolyn 
VanHom, Kimberly 
VanHyning, Jon 
Vann, Kathleen 
Varerza, Aluaro 
Varhaugvik, Svein 
Vassar, Shannon 
Vaughan, Gary 
Vaughan, Ginny 
Vaughan, Jay 
Vaughan, Joseph 
Vaughan, Rick 
Velanzen, Jessica 
Venafro, Mike 
Verede, Ria 
Verschilling, Scott 
Versen, Jill 
Vestal, Rebecca 
Vezina, Sheryl 
Via, Kristi 
Vicchio, Dennis 
Vick, Kenneth 
Viers, Kevin 
Vierschilling, Scott 
Villaflor, Marjorie 
Villarreal, David 
Viselli, Chris 
Vogel, Richard 
Vogelstein, Beth 
Vohs, Juliette 
Volley, Michael 
VoUmer, Meri 
Von Bechmann, Derek 
Vona, HoUie 
Vought, Andrew 
Vu, Trang 



33. 

1. 

3i: 

269,301 
28: 
28; 
231 
33- 

252,25; 
231 
30' 
321 
33. 
23] 
33; 

5; 

11 
33- 



181 

69, 33' 

23! 

291 

252, 25: 

238,291 

231 

34: 

18. 

23i 

136,138,13< 

34( 

30: 

33: 

32; 

290,33; 

18- 

231 



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238,33: 

252, 25: 

28: 



wwwww 



Waddel, Stacey 
Waddell, Alex 
Waddy, Charles 
Wade, Frank 
Wade, Jamie 
Wade, Tina 
Wadsworth, Jon 
Wagner, Andrea 
Wagnes, Mike 
Wagoner, Stephanie 
Waite, Mike 
Walker, Amy 
Walker, Charlene 
Walker, Cindy 



23! 
29( 
32. 
26,23! 
18: 
29( 
18: 

252, 25: 
32- 
231 
33< 
23! 

238,31 
18' 



382 Index 



Wtjenn 

fejQ,LiS3 

I'tiifi.Doui 



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fa.Cliiii 
Vei-.Eiic 
Tjty 
feW,0 
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fc 



alker, Davida 
alker, Scott 

Walker, Susan 

Wall, Mary 

Wallace, Caroline 

Wallace, Christopher 

Wallace, Kristine 

Walsh, Christina 

Walsh, Erin 

Walsh, Jon 

Walsh, Katie 

Walsh, Kimberly 
? Walsh, Philip 

Walsh, Tim 

Walsh, Valerie 

Walters, Dawn 

Walton, Todd 

Walty, Alyson 

Walz, John 

Wampler, Sarah 

Wan, Amy 

Wan, William 

Wanik, Alexia 

Ward, Anthony 

Ward, Brian 

^ard, Nate 
15^ Ward, Stephanie 

Wardzala, Karen 

Ware, Joanne 

Waring, C. Lawson 

Warlick, John 

Warner, Amy 

Warner, Dr. Mark 

A'arner, Matt 

Warren, Angela 

K'arren, Ashley 

Washington, Tyrone 

Waterman, J.D. 

Waters, Amy 

tVatkins, Jennifer 

Watkins, Stephanie 

IVatson, William 

Watts, Brian 

Watts, Carmelita 
,, Watts, J.H. 
1: Watts, Sheri 

IVatts, Susan 

Wawrzyniak, K.P. 

Wayland, Elizabeth 

(Vayne, Deborah 

Neaver, Christopher 

Weaver, Owen 

A'eaver, Sonya 

(Vebb, Brian 

Webb, Charley 

Webb, Jason 

A'eber, Dana 
". Wedberg, Amanda 
,,, Weede, Jennifer 
,!^ Wehrli, Lisa 

Weiler, Douglas 

Weinberg, Sara 

Weinberg, Seth 

^Veins, Chris 

^Veis, Eric 
,.. Weis, Trey 

A'eisbard, Olivia 
,^ Weiss, Deborah 
"„ Weiss, Katrine 

Weiss, Mary 

Weiss, Torrey 
' Weiss., Greg 
i I Weitzenhofer, Kim 
V Welck, Troy 
' Wellens, Dana 

Weller, Douglas 

Wells, Bill 

Wells, D.R. 

Wells, Ivy 

Wells, Jov 

Wells, Robin 

Wells, Scott 

Wells, Travis 

Wells, William 

Welsch, Amy 

Welsh, Joseph 

Welsh, Lisa 

Welty, Heidi 
'■•'l- Wenthold, Robert 



120, 121 
282 

261,310 
288 
322 
238 
238 
269 
122,123,304 
117 
339 

252, 253 
238 
333 
252, 253, 304 
238 
238 
238 
334 
238,295, 327 
315 
272 
312 
313 
133 
330 
339 
315 
120, 153, 313 

238,333 
333 
327 
285 
314 
238 
239,290, 296, 330 
133 
330 
324 
322 
322 

239,330 
296 
239 
304 
48,239, 304 
239 
136 
258, 327 
239 
282 
299 
239 
252, 253 
330 
182 
322 
239 
239 

239,296 
337 
60 
340 
282 
321 

127,133 
282 
239 
239,291, 337 
282 
324 
70 

269,294 
333 

239,327 
269 
291, 333 
339 
187 
187 

239,294 
81 
165 
239 
269 
239 
282 
339 
239 



Wentworth, Lellyett 
Wenzel, Janet 
Werner, Susan 
West, Carl 
West, Karen 
West, Tara 
Westley, Elizabeth 
Westrich, Richard 
Westwood, Mike 
Wethman, Katie 
Whalen, Rich 
Wheelbarger, Renee 
Wheeler, Kimberly 
Wheeler, Kristy 
Wheeler, Lisa 
Whelan, Elizabeth 
Whelan, Laura 
White, Bradley 
White, Candy 
White, Erika 
White, Frances 
White, Jeffery 
White, Melinda 
White, Richard 
White, Sean 
White, Simone 
White, Winifred 
Whitehead, Kris 
Whiteman, Greg 
Whitesell, Terry 
Whitlock, Ashley 
Whitlow, Chris 
Whitney, Shanell 
Whitt, Cynthia 
Whitten, David 
Widder, Katrina 
Widrick, Caryn 
Wieand, Matt 
Wiedeman, Tara 
Wilcox, Dr. Lyle 
Wilcox, Kip 
Wilcox, Steve 
Wilder, Donald 
Wildgrube, Karen-Lynne 
Wiles, Michael 
Wilk, Jason 
Wilk, Jessica 
Wilkins, Mindy 
Wilkinson, AnnaLisa 
Wilkinson, Chad 
Willams, Eriq 
Willard, Kristin 
Willey, Kris 
Williams, Aaron 
Williams, Allison 
Williams, Christine 
Williams, Christopher 
Williams, Cindy 
Williams, Eriq 
Williams, Gail 
Williams, Hunter 
Williams, Jason 
Williams, Jennifer 
Williams, Julius 
Williams, Karla 
Williams, Kimberly 
Williams, Michelle 
Williams, Pam 
Williams, Rebecca 
Williams, Stephen 
Williams, Timothy 
Williamson, Ashley 
Williamson, Lori 
Williamson, Sandee 
Williamson, Scott 
Williamson, Susan 
Willis, Karen 
Wilson, Blair 
Wilson, David 
Wilson, James 
Wilson, Kathy 
Wilson, Leigh 
Wilson, Libby 
Wilson, Marcus 
Wilson, Rhonda 
Wilson, Shawnda 
Wilson, Suzanne 
Wilson, Veronica 



282,339 

252, 253 
269 
269 
239 
339 
253 
239 
178 

90,253,311 
333 
282 
327 
282 
328 
11 
112 
239 
269,291,301,324 
239,321 
239 
239 
253 
239 
147 
32,239 
269 
333 
117 
117 
328 
253 

253, 321 
240 
240 
269 

240,312 
182 
282 
284 
321 
289 
240 
240 
333 
295 
282 
322 
240, 295 
136 
240 
328 
324 

269,273 

304 

240 

117,253,324 

301 

128,133 
311 
330 
316 

269,327 

132, 133 

327 

120,121,210,240 

122,240,304 

328 

337 

240,340 
240 
141 
253 
322 
277 
240 
269 
322 
339 
89,299 
328 
324 
282 
240 
253, 288, 301 
240,299, 321 
240 
240 



Wilt, Emily 
Wimer, Jerry 
Winder, Michelle 
Windham, Cheryl 
Windley, Monica 
Winer, Rachel 
Winett, Emily 
Wingert, Rochelle 
Winn, Lisa 
Winter, Alison 
Winter, Eve 
Winter, Margaret 
Wire, Mami 
Wise, Christina 
Wise, Nicole 
Withrow, Catherine 
Withrow, Eric 
Witmer, Elliot 
Witt, Melissa 
Wittman, Drew 
Wolf, Lynne 
Wollever, Mike 
Wolton, Todd 
Womack, Brian 
Womack, Todd 
Wong, Alice 
Wong, David 
Wong, Kenneth 
Wong, Tracy 
Wong, Wynne 
Woo, Kevin 
Wood, Allison 
Wood, Becky 
Wood, Christopher 
Wood, James 
Wood, Tara 
Woodard, Theresa 
Wooddell, Julie 
Woodin, Sandra 
Wooding, Melvin 
Woods, Jen 
Woods, Leigh 
Woods, Meg 
Woods, Tarsha 
Woodson, Andrea 
Woodson, Donna 
Woodson, Granville 
Woody, Kevin 
Woolever, Mike 
Worontzoff, Christine 
Worringham, Diane 
Wortham, Hunter 
Wright, Amy 
Wright, Corbitt 
Wright, Craig 
Wright, Damon 
Wright, Lisa 
Wright, Robert 
Wright, Wendy 
Wu, Emily 
Wu, Karen 
Wulf, Kristine 
Wulfe, Arin 
Wunder, Karen 
Wunder, Liane 
Wyatt, Ed 
Wyche, Andrea 
Wycoff, Jay 
Wynn, Jenny 



328 
340 

282,327 
296 

253, 301 
269 
187 
253 
313 
269,289, 327 
304 
240 
270 
339 

240,301 
240,299,324 

282,288 
330 
327 
147 
324 
159 
55 
240 
25 
282 
330 
270 

253, 301 
282 

240,298 
324 
301 

385, 390 
330 

289, 337 
282 
240,295, 296 
253 
313 
337 
294 
187 
253 
171,173,175 
240 
136 
117 
133 

253, 327 
241 

122, 123 
282 

178, 294 
133 

241,339 
282 
282 
324 
241 
282 

282,327 
324 

241,324 
282 
333 
313 
343 
253 



Young, Randee 
Youngblood, Graham 
Yuska, Mark 



82 



133 



zzzzz 



YYYYY 



Yager, Kimberly 
Yago, Nancy 
Yamell, Barbara 
Yates, Joseph 
Yeager, Scott 
Yeatts, Garnett 
Yerks, Piper 
Yingling, Jodi 
Yoch, Marchelle 
Yoho, Sheri 
Yonek, Lori 
York, Dianne 
Young, Celeste 
Young, Charles 
Young, Felicia 
« Young, Mathhew 



254 

156,157 
254 

241,301 
241 
241 
241 
241 
187 

254, 304 
241 

157, 158 
270 
241 
241 
339 



Zalubowski, Maleah 


322 


Zamer, Scott 


241 


Zamini, Don 


304 


Zarchin, Brian 


100 


Zarotny, Bill 


296 


Zempolich, Kristin 


254 


Zickel, Matthew 


26,241 


Zimmerman, Christopher 


241 


Zimmerman, Gretchen 


112,241 


Zimmerman, John 


280 


Zimmerman, Keith 


182 


Zimmerman, Ryan 


282 


Zipf, Missy 


180, 181 


Zippe, John 


340 


Zippier, Kevin 


334 


Zitelli, Erin 


241 


Zizzi, Sam 


255, 291 


Zoeckler, Tracy 


241 


Zook, Christine 


241 


Zvolenski, Mathhew 


328 



Index 383 




c. 



oiiege 

leyf sfudervfs 
vy^ifK a 




A LITTLE CHEER. Cheerleder Amy Elliot watches the band 
perform at the Homecoming football game with her young friend 
With the numerous activities at football games, there was 
something for everyone to enjoy. 

TIME OUT. Christopher Wood enjoys an unuaually warm 
January day as he reads on the Quad. Students often escaped thei 
dorm rooms and headed outdoors on pleasant days. 



LIFELONG 




As the year came to a close, the changes 
that made an impact on our Hves were appar- 
ent, and their repercussions would obviously 
be long lasting. The January Innauguration of 
Bill Clinton marked the arrival of the first 
Democrat in the White House after the 12 years 
of Repubulican administration under Ronald 
Reagan and George Bush. Just as the election 
affected us throughout this school year, we 
prepared ourselves for a future filled with new 
ideas and changing times. 

The impact made on the university as a 
whole was also evident. As students purchased 
their books for spring and summer classes, they 
observed a growing section in the bookstore 
devoted to the new College of Integrated Sci- 
ence and Technology. Students prepared for 
the great impact the new college developing 
across Interstate 81 was sure to have on the 
future of Madison and the reputation of the 
university across the state and country. 



Hid 



I M PACT 



Closing Divider 3o5 



WoRld of Impact 



Just as the the changes 
around campus made an impact 
on JMU students, the ever 
changing world also had a 
lasting effect on our lives. 
Events occurring across the 
nation and overseas all had 
some tvpe of impact that 
reached Harrisonburg, Virginia. 

For most of 1992, the 
presidential election was the top 
story in the media. At the 
Democratic Convention, Arkan- 
sas Governor Bill Clinton was 
selected to represent his party 
and faced incumbent President 
George Bush, and Independent 
candidate H. Ross Perot 
dropped out of the race in the 
summer and reentered it on 
October!. The candidates 
participated in live debates and 
focused their campaigns on 
issues such as the deficit, the 
sinking economy and environ- 
mental awareness. Clinton and 
running mate Al Gore were 
inaugurated on January 20, 
1993, amid a week long celebra- 
tion which focused on the 
Democratic platform for change 
and celebration of the average 
American. 

George Bush left the 
White House battling old rival 
Saddam Hussein, Persian Gulf 
War aggressor. Hussein and his 



army broke the United Nations 
peace treaty by violating a 
neutral nti-fly zone. This 
problem, along with a national 
economy crisis were some of the 
first concerns to face Bill Clinton 
in his presidency. 

The 1992 Olympics in 
Spain gave sports fans some- 
thing to cheer about, with 
basketball fans especially 
excited over the "Dream Team" 
performances of NBA stars in 
competition. The all-star squad 
won the gold medal after 
winning by large margins in 
each contest. Those games were 
the last for basketball legends 
Larry Bird and Earvin "Magic" 
Johnson, who retired officially 
from the NBA. In October, the 
Blue Jays became the first 
Canadian team ever to win the 
World Series. In football action 
the playoffs produced a young 
and talented Dallas Cowboy 
team which faced the Buffalo 
Bills, who were making their 
third consecutive Superbowl 
appearance. 

Two official national 
emergency situations domi- 
nated the press and captivated 
Americans in the past year. Los 
Angeles was the center of 
dissention and unrest when the 
Simi Valley jury returned a 




386 Closing 



courtesy of RijM Photo Siii'pli/ 

Civil war spread across Yugoslavia, a 
nation of six republics and two 
provinces that had been plagued for 
centuries by historic ethnic, religious 
and economic differences. Nationalist, 
anti-communist parties won elections in 
1991 in all republics except Serbia, the 
largest, and Montenegro, the smallest. 
Croatia and Slovenia declared their 
independence and rivalries remained 
strongest between Serbs and Croats. 



verdict of not guilty in the 
Rodney King trial. South 
Central was under seige as 
enraged residentstorched and 
looted their own neighborhood 
in a violent reaction to the 
controversial decision. Hurri- 
cane Andrew swept across 
southern Florida causing 
millions of dollars in damage as 
it bankrupted both homeowners 
and their insurance companies. 
Homestead, Florida was left 
with more wreckage than the 
homeless victims were capable 
of repairing. Nationwide, 
volunteer crews sent food and 
supplies to the ravaged town, in 
a display of American generos- 
ity and unity. 

The year in retrospect 
was one of pride, conflict and 
anticipation. Americans were 
eager for change and hoped that 
a democratic government could 
improve national affairs. 

Ross Perot became a billionaire when 
the computer company he founded 
began selling stock. He left the 
presidential race in July and then 
reentered as an Indepedent candidate in 
October, Perot chose James Stockdale as 
his running mate and the two partici- 
pated in the debates for their respective 
positions. Perot fimded his campaign 
with his millions and had many 
volunteers to assist in the promotion of 
the Independent camiidate. 




>iji 

"^4 




coiiilc^\/ ot /^*''A1 !'lin!o s 



The Rodney King trial sparked a string 
of riots, fires and looting incidents. The 
people of South Central L. A. took 
action to convey nationwide frustration 
with the unexpected verdict. 



The wives of the Democratic candidates, 
Hillary Clinton and Tipper Gore, were 
very active in the campaign. Women 
across America anticipated public 
promotion of equal rights for all. 

The Olympics were a success for the 
United States with a total of 108 medals. 
Everyone was delighted with the 
success of the Dream Team, compro- 
mised mainly of superstar NBA 
professionals for the first time. Carl 
lewis won two gold medals in the long 
jump and the 400 meter relay. 




Hurricane Andrew was an unexpected 
slap in the faces of southern Floridians. 
Suddenly homeless and without the 
facilities to repair the extensive damage, 
the people of Homestead turned to the 
nation for help. From all over the 
country, Americans began forming 
rescue missions and help operations to 
organize and ship volunteers and 
supphes to the southern tip of Florida. 



This year marked the end of George 
Bush's reign as President. Americans 
seemed disillusioned bv the economic 
slump and the government's role as 
international police force. People 
wanted a change, and Bush was ousted 
from the White House. 



Closing 3Qy 



PUPPY SITTING. A voluntecT "dog 
catcher" p,iints JMU letters on the face of 
one of the junior Dukes during the 
Homecoming game. The Puppv l\nmd 
ga\'e children a chance to enjoy the 
game with their friends. 



WHITE SEATS. Those students relying 
on bikes for transportation found their 
seats covered with snow after the 
December snowstorm. The snow 
caused difficulties for those rec]uired to 
travel. 





* ^ 



^ 





SNOW CAPPED. The sculpture of 
James Madison, outside Carrier Library, 
retains remnants of a December 
snowfall. The snowstorm covered the 
campus providing breathtaking scenery 
for the JMU community. 

RELAXING. Students take advantage of 
the warm weather by hanging out at 
Newman Lake. This was a favorite spot 
of lakeside residents for picnics and just 
taking it easy. 






1 '^^ 




3QQ Closing 




EdiiOR's Note 














This book is a culmina- 
tion of the hard work and ex- 
treme dedication of many people, 
particularly the '92-'93 Bhiestone 
staff. While "yearbooking" has 
always been a demanding task, 
we decided to increase the pres- 
sure a little more by leaving all of 
our previous knowledge behind 
and moving into the age of desk- 
top publishing. For the first three 
deadlines there was not a good 
word said about the Macs, except 
of course that computers are good, 
not bad! However, we overcame 
the difficulties and even began to 
feel comfortable sharing with each 
other! Through all the computer 
jokes and constant questions, 
though, almost every member of 
the staff learned more than they 
had thought possible when we 
started. 

Few people realize the 
dedication necessary to make ths 
yearbook possible. If we had, it 
probably wouldn't exist! Only 
those associated with it, directly 
or indirectly, understood the late 
nights, long weeks and unending 
all-nighters necessary to make this 
book happen. For this reason, I 
want to thank everyone that gave 
up their lives, or part thereof. To 
the photographers; For all the 
hours you slaved both shooting 
and developing, thank you— it 
would never have been possible 
without you. Dave: I know the 
role of editor is one of the tough- 
est, but you managed it well and 
did a great job. I'm sorry it took its 
toll, but I completely understand. 
Colleen: My saving grace and 



awesome pledge! You came 
through every time we needed 
you, I hope you know how much 
I appreciate it. And please know 
that I respect and admire every- 
thing you do - you'll go far. 

For the "production 
staff" staff, I would first like to 
thank the behind the scenes 
people, especially copywriters 
and volunteers. You are a core 
part of the staff, but never get the 
recognition you deserve. I hope 
this is only the beginning. For 
those whom I've gotten to know 
so well, through endless hours in 
the windowless vault, we did it! 

Kristy and Christine, 
you pulled through. I had my 
doubts at times, but thankfully, 
you proved me wrong. Kristy, I 
enjoyed our talks about the men 
in our lives, hopefully it'll work 
out for the both of us! Carrie and 
Cindy - 1 knew when we started 
that you two would get along, 
but I had no idea how well. You 
both added a great deal of fun to 
working in the office, as well as 
more hard work than 1 could have 
ever asked for. Thank you. 

Shannon, you're a char- 
acter. A very sarcastic one at 
that. Thank goodness you were 
willing to learn the computer, 
otherwise sports would have 
been continually neolithic. John, 
you and I have been at this for a 
long time. Thanks for sticking 
with it one more year, you are 
the best sports editor - ever! And 
for the Thursday night parties, 
you're the only guy that could 
hang with us chics! Except of 



<UI».<.'..'^.^ 




course, for Van — the solution to 
our snack attacks! Your willing- 
ness to do everything you could 
to get us money, and late night 
food runs saved us all. It was cool! 
And finally, to Heather. You al- 
ways came through just when 1 
needed you most. You've done a 
great job picking things up where 
I've left off, and I'm sure it'll be 
the same in the future. Thank you 
all. 

I would also like to thank 
Pete Griffin for letting us do what 
we needed to do and always tell- 
ing me what a great job we were 
doing. To Linda for putting up 
with all the mistakes we made - 
hopefully next year will go better. 
And to Jerry, I know you won- 
dered what was going on and if it 
would ever get finished, but 
thanks for never letting it show. 
We had it under control. Really! 

As for my personal sav- 
iors, I can't tell you how apprecia- 
tive I am that you all put up with 
me. Jen&Michele: My family! 
Thanks for all the supportive 
phone calls and keeping me up- 
dated on your lives! Cindy — 
you're the best, I could never have 
asked for a more devoted friend. 
It was great to have you as our 
honorary staff member — to crash 
on our couch. Thanks babe! And 
to Rob: I never would have made 
it without you. Thank you for my 
sanity, your help in getting this 
done, and for your love. It's fi- 
nally over. 

Kate Travers 

'92-'93 Editor-in-Chief 



REMINISCING. Members of the Retired 
Teachers Association of JMU get 
together to enjoy a Thanksgiving 
breakfast. The annual event gave the 
teachers an opportunity to look back on 
their days at JMU. 



Closing 389 



BluESTONE 


SlAff 


Editor-in-Chief 


-Kate Travers 


Managing Editor 


Heather Gustin 


Business Manager 


-Van Clayton 


Photography Editors 


-David Hohck 




-Colleen Magin 


Asst. Photography Editor -Lisa Manzo 


Features Editor 


Carrie Desmond 


Asst. Features Editor 


Cindy Scott 


Sports Editor 


John Rogers 


Asst. Sports Editor 


Shannon Bailey 


Sports Writer 


Joe Olson 


Classes Editor 


Kristi Shackelford 


Organizations Editor 


Christine Letsky 


Photographers 




Vince Centofanti 


Matt Humke 


MeHssa Fineo 


Vasha Hunt 


Joe Guilfoyle 


Craig Newman 


Christopher Haws 


Jason Williams 


Staff 




Kevin Bucher 


Tiffany Gobbi 


Beth Anne Howie 


Anna Selden 


Rebecca Haile 


Rob Singer 


Volunteers 




Jon-nell Berry 


Kate Ouellette 


Elizabeth Cartright 


Laura Weiland 


Dan Goldstein 


Melanie Stone 


Deana Holsington 


Brian Tetro 


Jennifer Howard 


Jen Williams 


Dena Reynolds 


Laura Weber 


Joe Russo 


Cheryl Windham 


Randi Gische 


Jennifer Grossman 


Jennifer Rissler 


Kristen Auclair 


Nancy Bograd 


Daryl Pigat 


Special Thanks 




Jerry Weaver 


JMU Sports Information 


Varden Studios 


Nancy Gray 


Dr. Richard Whitman 


Student Activities 


Pete Griffin 


Linda Nolf 


Bob Eyster 


Gitchell's Studio 


Glen's Fair Price 


UPB 


Office of Publications 


Special Collections 


RM Photo Service, Inc. 


WXJM staff 


Wal-Mart Photo Dep't. 


Ground Glass 


Jody Welsh 


Wanda Homel 


Tom Barr & Susan Joseph 


Diana Hamilton 


William Bailey 





390 Closing 




*> -m 





REBOUND. Matt Carpenter is fortunate 
enough to catch a T-shirt thrown into 
the sea of fans at the Auburn game. His 
excitement was typical of those students 
cheering the basketball team on. 



TRUE FANS. Members of the Puppy 
Pound anxiously await for the Duke 
Dog to arrive. The Duke Dog made 
frequent visits to the young fans during 
JMU football games. 




Curpcnter 



Volume 85 of the 
James Madison University 
Bluestoiie was printed by 
Josten's Printing and 
Publishing Division in State 
College, Pennsylvania using 
offset lithography. Linda 
Nolf served as our plant 
consultant and Pete Griffin 
was our local representa- 
tive. 

The cover was royal 
blue no. 533 on mission 
grain. The writing was flat 
screened in red no. 331, 
bevel debossed in silver foil 
no. 381, with a blind em- 
bossed panel. 

Palatino was used 
for all body copy, captions, 
bylines, photo credits and 
folios. Headline and sub- 
headlines styles include: 

Each section editor 
designed their respective 
sections. Cover, endsheets 
and Divider pages were 
designed by the Editor-in- 
Chief and Managing Editor. 
Artwork for the cover die 
was done by Bob Eyster of 
jostens. State College. 

Portraits and 
organization photos were 
taken by Varden Studios of 



ColophoiN 



Rochester, New York. Joel 
Siegel served as our Varden 
representative. Athletic team 
photos were provided by the 
office of Sports Information and 
Bliiestone photographers. Color 
photos were processed and 
printed by Varden Studios and 
Gitchell's Studio. All black and 
white photos were reproduced 
using a 133 line screen and all 
color photos were reproduced 
using a 150 line screen. 

The book was designed 
using Josten's Yeartech soft- 
ware in conjunction with Aldus 
PageMaker 4.2. We used four 
Macintosh EC's with 75MB. 

The 1993 edition of the 
Bluestone was produced by a 
non-profit, contracted and 
independent organization. 

Opinions expressed are 
not necessarily those of the 
administration, faculty, or the 
staff of the university. The 
editors accept responsibility for 
the content of the book. 

The offices of the 
Bluestone are located in rooms 
215 and 217 in Anthony Seeger 
Hall. The telephone number is 
(703)568-6541. 

Authorization to 
reproduce portions of this book 



and any further information 
may be obtained by writing to 
Bluestone, P.O. Box 3522, James 
Madison University, 
Harrisonburg, Virginia. 




Humki 

WALKIN THE TRACKS. This student 
makes her way home via the railroad 
tracks that ran through campus. The 
scenery around the tracks made walks 
to class a little more enjoyable. 



RAINY DAY. Carey Blair and her 
parents watch her boyfriend play sciccer 
despite the wet weather. Even inclement 
weather could not sway true fans from 
their favorite sports. 



Closing 39^ 




p 



After months full of forceful changes, the 
year came to an end with yet one more change, this 
one in the JIVIU Commencement Exercise. Instead 
of the traditional ceremony in which all May 
graduates received their diplomas in Bridgeforth 
Stadium, it was decided that students would hear 
speakers in the stadium, and then disperse with 
family and friends to the separate colleges for 
graduation. The changes were made to help the 
process go much more quickly, and was yet 
another sign of the changing times at JMU. 

The differences in the world forced us to be 
prepared for their effects on our future. The 
changes affected us all and, as JMU students, we 
tried to turn the changing times to our benefit. We 
became increasingly adept at being prepared for 
the impact of continual change, so that as they 
created more memories, they also gained the 
practical experience needed for life in the 1990's. 



392 Closing 






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